Audi’s new solar-roofed car expected by the end of 2017

August 24, 2017 by  
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The idea of a solar-powered car has been floating around for years, with many little-known companies promising to bring the concept to life. But now it may finally happen. Audi recently announced that it’s working on a solar-powered vehicle prototype that they expect to complete by the end of 2017. Audi has teamed up with Alta Devices, a division of the Chinese solar-cell specialist, Hanergy, to develop thin-film solar cells that can be integrated into a panoramic glass roof. The solar cells would then power the vehicle’s electrical systems, like the air-conditioning system or seat heaters, which would improve the range of an electric vehicle . The idea of solar-powered accessories isn’t entirely new: both Toyota and Nissan have also used the technology. Related: Sono Motors unveils the $18,000 SION solar-powered car The bigger news is that the two companies hope to improve the technology, so that the solar energy could directly charge an electric car’s battery. Audi hasn’t given a timetable for that capability, but the new solar cells have an efficiency of more than 25 percent. Audi also says the solar cells, which will be produced in California by Alta Devices , perform well in low light and high temperature conditions. “The range of electric cars plays a decisive role for our customers. Together with Hanergy, we plan to install innovative solar technology in our electric cars that will extend their range and is also sustainable,” stated Audi Board of Management Member for Procurement Dr. Bernd Martens. + Audi Images @Audi

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Audi’s new solar-roofed car expected by the end of 2017

These cyborg bacteria are better at photosynthesis than plants

August 24, 2017 by  
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Could cyborg bacteria generate clean power in the future? Researchers at UC Berkeley covered bacteria with small semiconductors that function like solar panels in order to see how much of the sun’s energy they could capture. The cyborg bacteria have a solar efficiency of 80% – which is four times greater than commercial solar panels and six times greater than the chlorophyll plants use in photosynthesis . Researchers in Peidong Yang’s laboratory gave the nonphotosynthetic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica cadmium, and the bacteria’s natural defense allowed it to produce cadmium sulfide crystals which accrued on the outside of their bodies and essentially acted as mini solar panels. The bacteria normally can produce acetic acid – which can be used for fuel, plastics, or pharmaceuticals – with carbon dioxide (CO2). But using their tiny solar panels, they were able to create acetic acid more efficiently with CO2, light, and water. Related: Cambridge scientists use light and plants to make cheap, clean hydrogen Kelsey Sakimoto of Harvard University , a past member of Yang’s group, told the BBC, “It’s shamefully simple, we’ve harnessed a natural ability of these bacteria that had never been looked at through this lens…You grow them in their liquid broth and you just add small aliquots of cadmium solution and you wait a couple of days and out pops these photosynthetic organisms. It’s all very simple, mix-in-a-pot chemistry .” Artificial photosynthesis techniques can be expensive, but big vats of liquid, in which the bacteria can be kept in sunlight, are really all that’s needed for this new process, so it could work well even in rural areas or developing countries . The self-replicating, self-regenerating bacteria offer a zero-waste technology, according to UC Berkeley. Sakimoto and Yang presented the research at the recent meeting of the American Chemical Society in Washington, D.C. Via the BBC , The Verge , and the University of California, Berkeley Images via planetMitch aunger on Unsplash and Kelsey K. Sakimoto

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These cyborg bacteria are better at photosynthesis than plants

Alta Devices Unveils the World’s Lightest, Most Efficient Solar Power Chargers

January 4, 2013 by  
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Alta Devices are known for their innovative solar power solutions – and they’ve broken new ground once again with their new line of photovoltaics , which are touted as the lightest and most efficient charging mats on the market. Developed for military use, the mats are slightly larger than a piece of paper and weigh in at only 4-ounces – so they can provide plenty of energy for a soldier in the field without the bulk of older technology. Read the rest of Alta Devices Unveils the World’s Lightest, Most Efficient Solar Power Chargers Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Alta Devices , Alta Devices Solar Power Mat , Alta Devices technology , Lightest Solar Power Mat , military solar power , portable energy , portable solar power , renewable energy , world’s lightest solar mat , world’s most efficient solar mat

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Alta Devices Unveils the World’s Lightest, Most Efficient Solar Power Chargers

House Passes First Stage of Hurricane Sandy Relief Package

January 4, 2013 by  
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After a tumultuous week of finger-pointing and blame-gaming, the House of Representatives voted on and passed the first stage of the Hurricane Sandy relief package today. The legislation will allow for $9.7 billion to cover insurance claims for homes that were damaged in the superstorm. READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: congress , environmental destruction , John Boehner , New Jersey Sandy relief , nyc hurricane sandy , NYC Sandy relief package , Part Stage of Sandy Relief Package Passes in the House , Representative Michael Grimm , Representative Peter King , Sandy aid bill , sandy relief

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House Passes First Stage of Hurricane Sandy Relief Package

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