Treehouse hotel in Bali offers maximum views with a minimal footprint

February 4, 2020 by  
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Bali-based architect Alexis Dornier has become known for his tropical architecture that creates a seamless connection between the human-made and nature. His latest project, the incredible Lift Treetop Boutique Hotel just outside of Ubud, Bali, continues the architect’s signature building technique of elevating eco-friendly structures off the ground to further reduce environmental impact. Located in Penestanan, a village just outside the popular tourist town of Ubud, the Lift Treetop Boutique Hotel is comprised of three soaring treehouses , each one distinct from the next. Embedded into a lush tropical forest, the treehouses offer guests the perfect spot to reconnect with nature while enjoying incredible views from high up in the canopy. Related: Prefab homes on stilts include solar panels, water collection systems and organic gardens Although all of the thatched-roof accommodations come with king-sized beds with en suite bathrooms and outdoor spaces, the treehouses are all different from one another. The Ernest Hemingway House was built using traditional methods of the Javanese people. The lowest of the three units on offer, this treehouse offers guests a serene, one-story lodging filled with rattan and reclaimed wood furniture. The George Orwell House has two stories. The top floor of this serene treehouse has a bedroom with an extended outdoor balcony and a rooftop deck for a bit of stargazing or bird watching. Next up is the largest of the three treehouses — the luxurious Stanley Kubrik House. Here, guests will enjoy a world of understated luxury, with an interior that offers unobstructed views from any angle. This treehouse offers a large en suite bedroom as well as an outdoor area with plenty of seating, including a hammock . Guests of the hotel will not only be able to immerse themselves in their own little paradise up in the trees, but they can also enjoy the hotel’s luxurious common areas. The treehouses are gathered around a central area with an abundance of lounge spaces, including a small sauna and a swimming pool. There is also an elevated yoga deck for getting bendy before hitting up the snack bar. + Alexis Dornier + Lift Bali Via ArchDaily Images via Alexis Dornier

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Treehouse hotel in Bali offers maximum views with a minimal footprint

myfoods smart greenhouses can grow nearly 900 pounds of produce a year

February 4, 2020 by  
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At CES 2020, French startup myfood presented a smart greenhouse that it says can grow up to 400 kilograms (880 pounds) of organic fruits and vegetables a year with only a few hours of work a week. Combining permaculture principles with smart technology to monitor plant health, the myfood smart greenhouses aim to change people’s relationships with food as a means of reducing the global carbon footprint . The startup has distributed nearly 200 smart greenhouses in 14 countries around the world and hopes to target the North American market next. Based in the French commune of Molsheim, myfood was born as a reaction against the agro-food industry’s intensive use of pesticides and fertilizers that have contributed to the loss of biodiversity and negatively affected human health. To reconnect people with nature, myfood developed a series of compact smart greenhouses to give communities around the world the opportunity to cultivate a healthy and diverse diet with fresh produce year-round from the comfort of their homes. Related: 3-hectare desert farm in Jordan can grow 286,600 pounds of veggies each year myfood currently has three types of smart greenhouses. For urban dwellers, the startup developed the 3.5-square-meter City smart greenhouse that can produce up to 100 kilograms of fruit and vegetables and can fit atop a rooftop, terrace , large balcony or small garden. Single urban dwellers with a very small living footprint can consider the 0.65-square-meter Aerospring Vertical Garden, which can grow up to 40 kilograms of fruit and vegetables a year in a small pot. The largest option, which is best suited for a single-family home with a yard, is the 22-square-meter Family smart greenhouse that can grow up to 400 kilograms of fruit and vegetables a year and is ideal for four people. All myfood structures are designed for easy and quick installation and are equipped with LED lighting and other energy-efficient systems that can be monitored remotely from a smartphone. Buyers also have the option to customize their smart greenhouses to best suit their needs, from off-grid applications to winterizing. “ Climate change requires a profound change in our consumption habits to limit our carbon dioxide emissions,” said Mickaël Gandecki, myfood co-founder. “To easily cultivate in a sustainable and efficient way, we employ both a synergy between fish and plants, as well as an approach inspired by nature and based on cutting-edge agronomic research. The connected and intelligent features enrich the experience by collecting parameters useful for managing the greenhouse. A dedicated social network supports users from the launch of the project, to the first harvests and beyond.” + myfood Images via myfood

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myfoods smart greenhouses can grow nearly 900 pounds of produce a year

Prefab homes on stilts include solar panels, water collection systems and organic gardens

November 29, 2019 by  
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Bali-based architect Alexis Dornier has unveiled a beautiful, eco-friendly concept for a series of prefabricated homes that are elevated off the landscape by stilts. The Stilt Studios come in a variety of sizes, from one-story to multi-level, all raised above the ground to reduce the structures’ impact. Additionally, the prefab design , which can be easily disassembled and moved to new locations, includes a number of sustainable features, such as solar power and integrated rainwater collection systems. According to the architect, inspiration for the Stilt Studios came from a problematic housing issue common in Bali . “The reality here is that we often find leasehold plots with a limited amount of years,” explained the German architect, who currently resides in Bali. “This situation calls for us to tread lightly through prefab ‘PropTech’ structures that could be packed up and re-erected someplace else.” Related: Beautiful cedar home stands high on stilts to accommodate heavy snowfall in Japan Accordingly, the concept calls for prefab building system, which would allow the units to be installed by families who are in need of extra space. The homes could also be used as rental units for extra income. The structures would come in a number of sizes as well, depending on the owners’ needs. The homes would be made out of steel frameworks initially, but Dornier hopes to build additional models out of CLT paneling . Other sustainable features to the design are plentiful, with solar arrays on the roof to generate energy, large roof overhangs to reduce solar heat gain on the interior and a built-in rainwater harvesting system to reuse water. Wide, open doorways and large windows would also promote natural air ventilation. The concept envisions families growing their own organic food underneath the buildings. + Alexis Dornier Via Dezeen Images via Alexis Dornier

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Prefab homes on stilts include solar panels, water collection systems and organic gardens

Reclaimed materials star in this surf villa with ocean views in Bali

November 5, 2019 by  
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The blissful charms of the Uluwatu Surf Villas have been elevated with a recent expansion that includes new villas designed by German architect Alexis Dornier in collaboration with Tim Russo. One of the additions is Puri Bukit, an ocean-facing, four-bedroom villa with sweeping views of the Indian Ocean in Bali. Built with reclaimed timber and locally sourced materials, the building blends traditional Balinese architecture with contemporary design. Located atop cliffs overlooking the ocean in southwest Bali , the Uluwatu Surf Villas were created as a luxury surfer’s paradise with premium villas, bungalows and loft accommodations. The 50-room retreat includes a mix of private and for-rent accommodations, the latter of which are categorized as Cliff Front villas, Ocean Front villas and Jungle View villas that range from one to four bedrooms in size. Related: This contemporary light-filled home feels like an extension of Bali’s tropics Dornier’s recently completed Ocean View 3 (Puri Bukit) villa measures 295 square meters and includes four master bedrooms with en suite bathrooms, making it one of the larger spaces on the property. Punctuated with a skylight, the tropical, modern villa is flooded with natural light and emphasizes indoor-outdoor living with large sliding glass doors that open up to views of the Indian Ocean. Guests can also enjoy access to a private, 40-square-meter saltwater pool. The open-plan living area includes a dining table that seats eight as well as custom-built sofas and a custom art piece by surf artist Andy Davis. As with the other properties, the villa was built with 100-year-old reclaimed teak from Java, reclaimed ironwood from Kalimantan, andesite, terrazzo and local limestone. “The center of the roof is crowned with a generous skylight that illuminates the expansive, centrally located living room,” reads the project statement. “While the main living area flows toward the outdoor pool side terrace and garden, the central core of the house corresponds to the prevailing linear axis running from the ascending entrance stairway, through the main living hall and all the way toward the sea.” + Alexis Dornier Photography by kiearch via Alexis Dornier

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Reclaimed materials star in this surf villa with ocean views in Bali

This contemporary light-filled home feels like an extension of Balis tropics

June 29, 2018 by  
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German architect Alexis Dornier of his eponymous Bali-based architecture practice recently completed a stunning modern home in an Indonesian tropical paradise. The private home — named House A — comprises four stories laid out over 8,072 square feet. Like the firm’s previous works, House A embraces indoor-outdoor living with full-height glazing and an open layout where views of lush greenery can be enjoyed at every turn. Built primarily of stone and dark timber, House A appears to be a natural extension of its evergreen surroundings in Mas, a village renowned for its hand-carved wood sculpture south of Ubud, Bali . This emphasis on the outdoors is carried through the color palette, from the neutral off-white textiles to the moss-green upholstery. Large potted plants are also bring the outdoors into the home. Metallic accents, clean lines and high-end fixtures from the likes of Grohe and Toto give the house its contemporary edge, while clear glass rooftops allow light to filter deep into the home. “The linear four-story arrangement counteracts the steep slope of the site by becoming a bridge house,” the firm said in a project statement. “The central theme of the ensemble is combining two architectural expressions: the idea of a romantic ruin, strongly connected to the ground and a light, fading, transparent structure holding a series of roofs; two images working with and against each other. The master deck is crowning the structure, continuing through a double-height exterior living space. The silhouette is a sequence of five roofs of different lengths. Linear skylights and linear gaps between the roofs complete a play of bar code like light play, changing as the sun is making its way from east to west.” Related: An ever-evolving, growing home in Indonesia adapts to its owners’ needs The guest bedrooms are located on the lower levels of the house, while the main living spaces like the kitchen and double-height dining room are placed on the third floor. The en suite master bedroom can be found on the top floor. + Alexis Dornier Images via Alexis Dornier

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This contemporary light-filled home feels like an extension of Balis tropics

Sculptural open-air pavilion blends into a rocky Norwegian landscape

June 29, 2018 by  
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When Oslo-based design studio MORFEUS arkitekter first laid eyes on Bukkekjerka, a rock formation framed by the rugged mountains on the east and the open sea to the west, its natural beauty stunned them. So, when they were tasked with designing an open-air pavilion on the site along the Norwegian Scenic Route Andøya, they understandably wanted to take a sensitive approach so as not to detract from the landscape. The resulting design is a contemporary structure built from folded concrete to mimic the surrounding jagged mountain peaks. Spanning an area of 2,800 square feet, the Bukkekjerka rest station comprises a series of structures spread out across the landscape. The parking and service facilities are placed in the north, while a freestanding bench in the mountains is oriented for views of the midnight sun. Picnic areas and a footbridge trace a path toward the lighthouses to the east. Consecrated land and unique geological formations can be found in the south, which MORFEUS arkitekter has designed for use as an annual open-air church for weddings and other gatherings. “Our hope is that these elements are unveiled and experienced gradually, encouraging further exploration and experience of the inherent qualities of the place,” explains Caroline Støvring and Cecilie Wille of MORFEUS arkitekter. “The built elements are adapted to the existing terrain, not the other way around. We have wanted to proceed carefully, but also with a boldness that echoes the surrounding landscape. We have desired the project to appear more like landscape and sculptural elements, less like a building.” Related: Off-grid Fossil Discovery Exhibit camouflages into the Texan desert The majority of the structures are open-air; however, even the service building with toilets manages to embrace the landscape with one-way mirrored glass cladding. The glass allows visitors inside the building to enjoy views over the sea and the mountain peaks in the north, while the mirrored side helps blend the building into the landscape. The building is also constructed from polished, acid-resistant steel with a mirror-like shine. + MORFEUS arkitekter Images ©MORFEUS Støvring Wille

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Sculptural open-air pavilion blends into a rocky Norwegian landscape

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