1973 Airstream is an ‘easy-breezy’ off-grid home with a fold-out deck

May 12, 2020 by  
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Design-build firm Innovative Spaces worked with a client to bring her tiny-home-on-wheels dream to fruition by renovating a 1973 Airstream Tradewind into the Alice Airstream — a gorgeous, modern home complete with off-grid capabilities and a deck. When tasked by an adventurous client to create a new home on wheels for herself and her dog and cat, the Innovative Spaces team went to work searching for the perfect abode. Not only did the home have to be mobile, but it had to be off-grid ready as well. When the designers found a 1973 Airstream Tradewind, they knew they had the perfect trailer to get started. Related: Artist revamps dingy interior of a 1962 Airstream with vibrant florals Innovative Spaces owner Nate Stover explained that although the Airstream trailer was in fairly poor shape, they knew they had found a diamond in the rough. “The condition of these vintage trailers rarely matters for our projects, as we replace just about everything on the interior and often also do quite a bit of customization on the exterior” Stover said. “It was your typical 1970s trailer — pretty funky inside after years of sitting around.” Alas, the classic trailer was about to receive a very modern-day makeover at the hands of the creative design team. Although the exterior was in good shape, only requiring a cleanup and new coat of a Sprinter Blue Grey paint, the interior needed to be completely gutted. The first step was to lift the shell off of the chassis to ensure that the home had a solid foundation. To do so, they had to rebuild a new chassis out of aluminum, which was chosen specifically to give the trailer a durable shell. Next up, a new subfloor system comprised of gray and black water tanks, wiring and plumbing and fiberboard was installed, followed by spray foam insulation. The final and most exciting step was implementing the new interior design . The client had requested an open-concept space that included a decent cook’s kitchen and a spa-like bathroom. From there, Innovative Spaces added deep shades of blue to complement the white walls and natural tones throughout the interior. Most of the furnishings within the 165-square-foot home were designed to provide optimal comfort and functionality. The enviable kitchen includes modern appliances as well as a small dining nook at the entrance. The sofa doubles as a bed while an opaque, flower-printed privacy wall leads to the luxurious bathroom. Of course, the design also makes plenty of space for the cat and dog with custom, built-in pet beds. Although the trailer’s interior is definitely compact, the savvy layout and fresh design scheme makes the space extremely livable. When it’s warm enough to enjoy the great outdoors, the Airstream has an awesome added amenity — a drop-down deck with enough room for seating plus protective netting to keep bugs at bay. + Innovative Spaces Via Dwell Images via Innovative Spaces

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1973 Airstream is an ‘easy-breezy’ off-grid home with a fold-out deck

3XN unveils LEED Platinum-seeking Forskaren innovation center in Stockholm

May 12, 2020 by  
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Danish architecture firm 3XN has won a design competition for Forskaren, a new mixed-use innovation center for health and life science companies in Stockholm. Designed to achieve LEED Platinum certification, the rounded 24,000-square-meter building will draw power from renewable sources. Forskaren will also promote sustainable principles among its tenants with the inclusion of light-filled collaborative spaces and restaurants with eco-friendly fare. Forskaren was designed as part of Hagastaden, a 96-hectare district that is one of the city’s largest and most important urban development projects. The new building will be located between the Karolinska University Hospital and the old Stockholm city hospital to cement the district’s reputation as a world-class destination for research in health, life science and treatment. Hagastaden, which is slated for completion in 2025, also encompasses new housing, a subway station and green spaces. Related: Sculptural, energy-saving office boasts the “smartest building advances in Germany” Forskaren reflects the ambitions of the new district with an open and inviting design built largely of natural materials both inside and out. The building will comprise office space for both established companies and startups as well as restaurants, cafes and an exhibition area showcasing cutting-edge life science research. The light-filled building will be centered on an airy atrium with a distinctive spiral staircase. Along with its surrounding square, Forskaren’s amenities will be publicly accessible as part of a plan to make the building a natural gathering point in Hagastaden. To meet LEED Platinum standards, Forskaren will be equipped with rooftop solar panels and geothermal heat pumps. Graywater collected from rainwater harvesting systems will be used for irrigation and watering plants. Expansive glazing, timber solar shades and a series of other energy-efficient building systems will help keep energy use to a minimum. Forskaren is slated for completion in 2024. + 3XN Images via 3XN

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Best practices for outdoor exercise during COVID-19

May 12, 2020 by  
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Now that states are starting to ease their lockdowns, outdoorsy and active people are eager to hit the trails or pick up their tennis rackets and golf clubs. But what do you need to know before getting active amidst COVID-19 ? Here are tips to stay safe while enjoying the great outdoors during a pandemic. Picking the safest activities The virus is still out there. So as you venture out of your home, remember to keep your guard up. The safest activities are those that let you maintain physical distance and congregate with as few people as possible — it’s still safest to stick with members of your own household. Related: COVID-19 and its effects on the environment If you must recreate with the population beyond your quarantine-mates, singles tennis is going to be safer than doubles, because there’s only one person on each side of the net and only one other person touching your tennis balls. You can probably golf safely, but a post-golf hang out in the clubhouse is a bad idea. For now, you’re better off avoiding sports that require close contact and lots of hands on the same equipment, such as soccer, basketball and volleyball. Hiking At first thought, hiking seems like the perfect pandemic activity. What could be more socially distanced than trekking through the wilderness? Well, nothing. Except that, depending where you live, half of your neighbors probably had the same idea. Plus, hiking trails are narrow. So what happens when one hiker wants to pass another? Choose your hiking trails carefully. Depending on where you live, trailheads might be blocked and parking lots could be closed. Try to check your local ordinances before you head out. This can be tricky, since websites may not be up to date and conditions can change rapidly. In Oregon, official guidelines currently say, “Be prepared for last minute changes to ensure the safety and health of others.” In other words, rangers may close trailheads or parking lots at any minute if folks fail to behave responsibly. Pick the less popular trails, go early and abort the mission if there are too many cars parked near the trailhead. Have a face mask handy so you can cover up and protect fellow hikers if you need to pass them. Avoid narrow trails on cliff edges, where there’s nowhere to step aside. If your dog wants to come along, plan to hike on a wide trail or in a remote area. If the trails are too crowded, and/or you can’t resist those puppy-dog eyes, consider looking for quiet country roads and going for a ramble rather than a hike. Running Since the gyms closed, the number of outdoor runners seems to have multiplied. It can be tricky to navigate your path as you stay 6 feet away from other humans. This might mean zig-zagging from one side of the street to the other, coming to a dead stop when a group of kids go by on trikes and being highly alert to avoid cars and bikes. You’ll need your wits about you. Either skip the headphones or only wear one. With regular routes suddenly too crowded for physical distancing, it’s also important to be vigilant when navigating less familiar terrain. Distance runners might need to plan their routes more carefully. Being 4 miles from home on city streets and suddenly realizing all the public restrooms are closed — well, that’s not a fun predicament. This isn’t a great time for public drinking fountains, either. So carry a reusable water bottle or plan your route so that you can stop by your house for a mid-run comfort break. Water sports As spring turns into summer , water lovers’ thoughts turn to their local beaches, rivers and lakes. Many water sports are a good option during COVID-19, but this isn’t a good time to take up anything extreme. You really don’t want to have to seek medical attention or be hospitalized right now. Instead, try activities like kayaking or paddle boarding on calm waters. But because even the calmest water can be dangerous, go with your household or a buddy. You can stay in close proximity with the people you live with, but if you meet up with a friend, you do need to continue to practice social distancing. Some outfitters are opening up now for contactless rentals and physically distanced group outings with well-sanitized kayaks. This is a good option if you don’t own the gear. Swimming and surfing can also be done while adhering to physical distancing guidelines. Adhere to local ordinances and, again, go with your household or a friend. Other outdoor exercise tips and etiquette As you venture outdoors, keep your safety and that of others in mind by following local ordinances and official guidelines. If you live in a place where face masks are optional, bring one along in case conditions turn out to be more crowded than expected. Stick a small bottle of hand sanitizer in your pocket in case you have to touch something. If you’re exerting yourself, watch where you are huffing and puffing. People going on a socially distant walk with family or housemates should go single-file if others are trying to pass. If other people fail to observe proper pandemic etiquette, stay calm. Move away from people breathing in your space. Also, remember why you’re going outdoors: fresh air, exercise and the uplifting effects of nature . This is a time to prioritize physical health and sanity, not athletic achievement or personal best race times. So get outside, be safe and try to be kind to yourself and others. Images via Teresa Bergen / Inhabitat

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Best practices for outdoor exercise during COVID-19

1971 Airstream gets glossy modern makeover, off-grid power

March 9, 2020 by  
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Although we’ve covered some gorgeous  Airstream renovations  over the years, there’s always one project that really blows our design-loving minds. This beautiful retrofit of a 1971 Airstream by Idaho-based  Traverse Design + Build is simply incredible. Once covered with a rusted out exterior and filled with a dingy avocado-green interior, the 27-foot trailer is now a gleaming contemporary home-on-wheels that can run completely off-grid . Though the team behind Traverse Design + Build had quite a few  Airstream conversions under their belts, when they saw an old 1971 Airstream Overland International for sale, they knew it would be a massive undertaking. The entire aluminum hull was almost entirely oxidized, and the outdated interior (comprised of avocado-green appliances, rotten flooring and yellow walls) was screaming to be put out of its misery. Related: A 1989 Airstream is converted into a modern home on wheels for a family of 6 In addition to the  Airstream’s rundown exterior and interior, all of the trailer’s electrical systems, which had been “modified” over the years, were completely shot. “There were electrical modifications that were done to it which were extremely dangerous,” said Jodi Rathbun, owner and founder of Traverse Design + Build. “We were surprised it never caught on fire, and that no one had been electrocuted.” To begin the arduous  renovation process , the team went to work on the exterior. According to Rathburn, just polishing the exterior to bring out its signature silver shine took more than 160 hours. Once the exterior was set and the hull’s trim repaired, it was time to tackle the interior space. The first step was to gut the interior almost entirely. The dilapidated, nearly 50-year-old trailer had little inside to reuse, but the team managed to retain some of the original elements  whenever possible. For example, they were able to reconfigure some of the existing storage cabinetry and some of the electrical and plumbing systems were able to be repaired. Other than that, the trailer’s interior living space was completely overhauled. To brighten up the space, a fresh coat of all-white paint was used on the walls and ceiling, and engineered maple floors were installed to give a little bit of warmth to the  interior design . The kitchen was built out with white IKEA cabinetry that contrasts nicely with the Tiffany-blue upper cabinetry, which was kept in place as a nod to the trailer’s long history. Throughout the space, the team managed to use ethical, sustainable, and fair-trade items to decorate. Not only did the designers manage to breathe new life into the 1971 Airstream, but they also enabled the trailer to run off-grid. A 510-watt  solar system generates enough power to run off-grid for extended periods. Additionally, there is an on-demand water heater, and LED lighting was installed throughout. The bathroom even features a Nature’s Head composting toilet, again enabling the trailer to be self-sustaining. “We built this so that it could be used off-grid, and away from power and water hookups for extended periods,” said Rathbun. + Traverse Design + Build Via Dwell Images via Traverse Design + Build

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Clean Lakes Alliance provides Madison with year-round lake fun

March 9, 2020 by  
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On a chilly February day in Madison, Wisconsin, more than 8,000 people venture onto frozen Lake Mendota. Kids toast marshmallows and warm their hands over fires; people try curling, they skate, they slide, they fall on their butts — they have a great time. Kites brighten up the frozen landscape. Skydivers jump from planes and land on the lake’s glossy surface. This is the annual Frozen Assets Festival, a citywide party and a fundraiser for Clean Lakes Alliance. “The neat thing about Madison is that we have these five lakes,” said James Tye, founder and executive director of Clean Lakes Alliance . “And all spring, all summer, all fall, people are fishing and they’re kayaking and they’re doing all these wonderful things on the lakes. But in the winter, they’re frozen. And our lakes, to our community , are our biggest assets. So doing a play on words, they are truly our frozen assets in the winter.” When Mendota, the biggest lake, is frozen, it can turn into the city’s largest park with just a little imagination. Related: 5 sustainable activities to make the most of a winter wonderland A chain of lakes The 62-mile long Yahara River connects Madison’s five lakes. Mendota is the first and largest lake in the Yahara chain. The others are Monona, Waubesa, Kegonsa and Wingra. Before western explorers came to Wisconsin, the Ho-Chunk Nation inhabited southern Wisconsin, including present-day Madison. Later, white settlers developed Madison, eventually moving the state capital here. The lakes have always been an important part of the area’s history. “We’re a coastal city in landlocked middle America,” said Adam Sodersten, marketing and communications director of Clean Lakes Alliance. “Without the lakes, we’re Lincoln, Nebraska. We’re a capital in a Midwestern city. But because we have these large urban gems, it really makes Madison stand out.” For most Madison residents these days, the lakes mean recreation. The five lakes have a combined total of 24 miles of publicly owned shoreline, said Sodersten. “So they’re not inaccessible. They’re not just built up by people who can afford to live on the lakes. There’s public spaces, there’s the university, there are state parks, county parks. They’re truly the people’s lakes.” The lakes also serve as an important recruiting tool for large businesses headquartered in Madison. To attract the best talent — especially millennials focused on work/life balance — companies have to demonstrate a high quality of life. “So the businesses here have really recognized that when people fly into Madison, if they’re flying into Dane County, they can’t fly over green and unusable lakes,” Sodersten said. Dangers to Madison’s lakes James Tye founded Clean Lakes Alliance in 2010 to protect the lakes he loves. “I’m actually a townie,” he said. “I’m actually from Madison, and was fortunate that my dad taught me how to swim and fish, canoe and kayak, waterski and sail on the Madison lakes . So at a very young age, I got that water connection.” Despite the residents’ love of lakes, they didn’t know how to best take care of them. Part of the trouble was century-old infrastructure that was built long before today’s current best practices for lake management. Storm sewers channel water straight into the lakes. One of the lakes’ biggest enemies? Leaves. Especially leaves in streets. “So when a leaf is in the street, the storm water runs through it like a teabag,” Sodersten explained. That phosphorus-rich storm water flows into the lake, fueling cyanobacteria bloom. Commonly known as blue-green algae , cyanobacteria can be toxic enough to require officials to close beaches. Because changing the infrastructure would be extremely difficult and costly, Clean Lakes Alliance focuses on what people can do to protect the lakes. Clean Lakes Alliance works with other cities and municipalities around the watershed to coordinate leaf management efforts. Instead of raking leaves into the streets, Clean Lakes Alliance suggests individuals pile leaves on their own grass or onto the narrow strip of grass between the sidewalk and the street. If homeowners keep storm water on their property by building a rain garden or collecting it in rain barrels, the lakes would appreciate it. But in addition to Madison’s urban area, the watershed also serves a very large rural area. “We’re the dairy state,” Tye said, emphasizing the productivity of Dane County’s cows . Clean Lakes Alliance partners with farmers to impart ways to reduce erosion and runoff and to improve manure management. One simple example is installing harvestable buffer strips at least 30 feet wide between fields and the nearest stream or shore ditch. Clean Lakes Alliance also helped purchase a manure injector machine that local farmers can rent. Instead of spreading manure on a frozen field for winter — bad for runoff — the machine shoots the manure 6 inches into the ground, putting the nutrients right at the roots of plants where farmers need them. Lake cleanup and monitoring Clean Lakes Alliance volunteers have the opportunity to take on many tasks. Volunteer jobs include office work, picking up trash, raking beaches, getting leaves off the streets in fall, water monitoring, partnering with local parks to remove invasive species and stamping storm water drains to warn people that the water goes directly to the lake. “More companies are having their employees do teambuilding exercises by doing volunteer days,” Tye said. “Like from Lands’ End alone, they’ll bring out 100 to 160 people on a volunteer day. They’re working at a park called Pheasant Branch Conservancy. And they’re doing the major work to restore the creek that goes right into Lake Mendota.” The lake monitoring program is especially useful to locals planning a day of kayaking or swimming in the lakes. Clean Lakes Alliance partners with the city and county health departments and the University of Wisconsin to gauge lake clarity. From Memorial Day weekend through mid-November, 70 citizen monitors trained by Clean Lakes Alliance check the water quality at local beaches and post their findings to Lakeforecast.org . “It tells people what the clarity of the lake is, what beaches are open, what beaches are closed,” Tye said. The citizen monitors provide the fine-tuned data so folks can plan their recreational activities. “The beach might be open and there might be one foot of clarity. But maybe a beach on the other side of the lake has three feet of clarity.” Clean Lakes Alliance hopes that its campaign to educate greater Madison will normalize everyday actions people can take to protect the lakes. “It’s sort of like recycling,” Tye said. “In Madison in the ‘70s, we started tying up newspapers and putting them out in the street. Now you’ve got two trashcans built into your kitchen that you open up a door and there’s recycling and non-recycling.” He hopes that people will think about the lakes when building parking lots, designing their own backyards and making decisions like adding rain barrels for water reuse. “One of those probably doesn’t make a difference,” Tye said. “But when you get 50,000 houses or 100,000 homes, you really start making an impact.” + Clean Lakes Alliance Images via Teresa Bergen / Inhabitat and Clean Lakes Alliance

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Clean Lakes Alliance provides Madison with year-round lake fun

Intergravity launches sustainable clothing that reduces the need to do laundry

March 9, 2020 by  
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An exciting trend is hitting the fashion market, and it’s not about the coolest design or newest fad — it’s about corporate responsibility and sustainable practices. There are companies who believe fashion can be eco-friendly, ethical and affordable, and this Kickstarter campaign for sustainable, anti-bacterial clothing by Intergravity is the perfect example of this mindset. The company started out as a design and production house aimed at helping start-up designers build their collections. Along the way, it discovered a desire to make a clothing line that was long-lasting and eco-friendly, so the team evaluated every step in the operation and made every improvement they could think of. Related: Designer Dana Cohen creates unique, recycled fabric garments Intergravity begins its process by making its own fabric in-house. This way, it can control waste and production resources, such as water and electricity. All clothing is made from organic cotton, recycled polyester, Lenzing Ecovera and Tencel. Any leftover fabric will be donated to make cuff gloves for people who are at high-risk of being exposed to bacteria (e.g. street cleaners and janitors). All garments are produced by a small, family-run factory with a staff comprised of 80% women. Workers receive 15-20% of each garment’s price and are guaranteed a fair wage. To ensure the clothing meets the highest standards for eco-friendly practices, it is OEKO Tex 100 Standard, Bluesign and Global Organic Textile Standard certified. Intergravity’s focus is not only on conservation during production but also during the life of the garment. With this in mind, it coats products with Polygiene, an anti-bacterial and odor-control treatment. With the knowledge that cutting back on washing and drying clothing consumes less resources, Intergravity clothing can be worn longer between washings, saving time, money, water and electricity over the life of the garment. Each design factors in a wide size range to suit a variety of body types and includes an adjustable fit in shirts. Quality stitching, copious pockets and functional design round out the reasons to hold on to each garment for the long-haul rather than subscribing to fast fashion . To further its goal of protecting the Earth, Intergravity has joined 1% For the Planet as a way of giving back. At the time of writing, the campaign is nearly fully funded. If it achieves its goal, Intergravity is scheduling shipments for June 2020. + Intergravity Images via Intergravity

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New Airstream trailer is built to tackle off-roading for 40K

August 1, 2018 by  
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Want to tackle rough roads in style? Airstream , the makers of the iconic “silver bullet” trailers, has just unveiled the new Basecamp X Package, a compact camper specifically designed for rugged roads. The all-terrain Basecamp X Package comes with a convertible and multifunctional rear space that delivers style and the comforts of home to any adventure off the beaten path. Clad in shiny aluminum panels, the Basecamp X Package is the more rugged cousin of Basecamp , a tiny trailer launched two years ago. The newly unveiled trailer offers all the standard Basecamp features—such as versatile storage solutions throughout and a solar pre-wire kit for renewable power hookups—as well as brand-new features. These include a three-inch lift kit for added ground clearance, Goodyear Wrangler all-terrain tires, a stainless steel front stone guard, a solar front window protection, and a black shadow wheel design. “Our Basecamp X encourages you to go on bigger adventures,” said Airstream CEO and President Bob Wheeler in a press release. “You can tackle rough roads and cold-weather driving with confidence. “The higher departure angle along with the aerodynamic design opens up a new world to explore.” Related: Airstream’s new Basecamp is a tiny house you can tow practically anywhere The compact unit has a base weight of just 2,635 pounds—with a maximum trailer capacity (GVWR) of 3,500 pounds—and can be easily adapted for eating, sleeping, lounging or storage. Large rear cargo hatches make loading and unloading easy. The Basecamp X Package is towable with a variety of small and mid-sized SUVs and Crossovers. The pricing for the Basecamp X Package units starts at $39,600. + Airstream

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Go glamping in this retro Airstream camp surrounded by redwood forests

May 3, 2018 by  
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Traveling the country in an renovated Airstream is a dream for many, but those looking for just a little weekend Airstream glamping will find all they need at this beautiful retreat. Located by the Russian River in the heart of Sonoma’s Wine Country, AutoCamp is a picturesque getaway that offers custom-made Airstream accommodations with luxurious amenities, all surrounded by majestic redwood forests. The Airstream resort offers a number of custom-made Airstreams that were designed by Dan Weber Architecture in collaboration with Airstream USA. While the vintage charm of the Airstreams is clearly visible, the campers were created to provide guests with the ultimate glamping experience. The designers outfitted each suite with plush, modern interiors and amenities that rival any top-quality boutique hotel. Related: This dreamy boutique hotel in California is made up of 11 refurbished Airstreams Inside, guests can enjoy a comfy queen-sized bed with high-quality linens. The iconic campers also come with small kitchens with basic cooking utensils, wine glasses and silverware. The spa-like bathrooms have a large walk-in showers and custom vanity sinks. Each camper features a large sofa bed to accommodate additional overnight guests. To best enjoy the surrounding nature, each Airstream comes with a small deck and fire pit. Guests can rent bicycles from the site to explore the beautiful redwood forests or head to nearby Guerneville. The campsite also has a beautiful clubhouse, where campers can visit the reception desk, canteen and cool lounge areas with hanging rattan chairs. + AutoCamp + Anacapa Architecture Via Dwell

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Go glamping in this retro Airstream camp surrounded by redwood forests

Magical new classroom reconnects children with nature in the UK

May 3, 2018 by  
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Dramatic swooping roofs top this new timber-clad building designed by Studio Weave for Belvue School, a secondary school for children aged between 11 and 19 with moderate to severe learning difficulties. Appropriately dubbed The Wooden Classroom, the building was created to help reconnect students with nature and opens up to the adjacent woodland recently acquired by the school to serve as an educational nature reserve. Constructed from a low budget originally allocated for a cargotecture school expansion, the 1,600-square-foot The Wooden Classroom comprises a “cozy lounge” informal teaching space and a “sociable kitchen” student-run school cafe next to the woods. “We identified that the boundary between the playground and woods marks the border between familiar school territory and the magical, mysterious world of trees,” said Studio Weave. “This very important threshold, symbolising the entrance to another world, like the gate to the secret garden, or the cupboard to Narnia became a focal point and we consequently designed the woodland classrooms to act as a gatehouse between one world and another.” Related: Free off-grid shelter pops up for urban explorers in Bordeaux The wood-lined interior is flooded with natural light with curved ceilings and clerestory windows . The Wooden Classroom is entirely naturally ventilated. Large window walls frame views of the outdoors and bring nature in. Studio Weave also worked with a forest management specialist for their sensitive approach to the landscape. + Studio Weave Images via Studio Weave

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Interstellar cabins ring Snhettas otherworldly planetarium in Norway

May 3, 2018 by  
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An out-of-this-world design upgrade is coming to Solobservatoriet, the world’s largest solar observatory north of the Alps in Harestua, Norway . Snøhetta just unveiled their designs for the site’s new planetarium and visitor center as well as seven “interstellar cabins” arranged like orbiting planets around the planetarium’s golden dome. The astronomical facility is located 28 miles of Oslo at an elevated site 1,900 feet above sea level. The star of Snøhetta’s new designs is undoubtedly the Planetarium , a half-sunken structure designed as the first thing visitors see when they arrive to the facility via the forest footpaths. At the heart of the Planetarium is the 100-seat “celestial theater” housed in a golden orb engraved with constellations that appears to emerge from the earth and is visible from outside. Skylights as well as a sloping and accessible green roof planted with grass, wild heather, blueberry, and lingonberry bushes wrap around the golden dome. In addition to the theater, the Planetarium’s lower level includes a reception, cafe, exhibition area, and a ramp that leads up to an exhibition mezzanine and outdoor green roof. Outside, seven “interstellar cabins ” are arranged around the Planetarium like unique orbiting planets. Six of the planets alternate between 27 and 33 feet in diameter and accommodate up to 10 to 32 people respectively, while the smallest planet, Zolo, measures nearly 20 feet in diameter and houses just two guests. The new visitor’s center will be placed near the original solar observatory. Related: Snøhetta unveils plans for world’s first “energy-positive” hotel in the Arctic Circle “The new Planetarium and cabins represent an ambitious expansion of the current and modest facilities, turning the entire site into a publicly accessible and international knowledge hub while also providing expanded support spaces for activities such as teambuilding, lectures and seminars,” wrote the architects. + Snøhetta Images via Snøhetta

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