Hundreds of Amazon employees risk jobs to protest company’s climate policies

January 28, 2020 by  
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Hundreds of Amazon employees have joined in solidarity, forming the advocacy group Amazon Employees for Climate Justice (AECJ) to protest the company’s climate policies. AECJ seeks to push Amazon into adopting more eco-conscious practices, but Amazon has threatened the protesters with termination for violating its communications policy. Undeterred, AECJ’s campaign continues to pressure the e-commerce behemoth into rethinking its environmental impact. Last autumn, Amazon became The Climate Pledge ’s first signatory, vowing to meet the Paris Agreement 10 years early. Amazon announced, “The Climate Pledge calls on signatories to be net-zero carbon across their businesses by 2040 — a decade ahead of the Paris Accord’s goal of 2050.” Amazon promised to decarbonize, develop low-carbon products and services, invest $100 million toward reforestation and shift toward 80% renewable energy by 2024 and 100% renewable energy by 2030. Related: Over 6,000 employees demand Amazon take climate change seriously In response, AECJ — which bills itself on Twitter as “a group of Amazon employees who believe it’s our responsibility to ensure our business models don’t contribute to the climate crisis” — has called on the tech giant to accelerate its sustainability practices. AECJ wants Amazon to achieve carbon neutrality by 2030 and steer away from contracts with fossil fuel companies. To guarantee accountability with its Climate Pledge, Amazon also unveiled a sustainability website . There, Amazon publicly pledged to “promote safe and inclusive workplaces in our operations and throughout our supply chain.” That measure became a point of contention with AECJ, whose members criticize Amazon for not taking sufficient action. For instance, Wired reported that Amazon workers lambasted Amazon’s supply chain for being “built at the expense of warehouse workers who work at a pace that causes higher-than-industry-average industry rates. It’s not humane to have people scared to go to the bathroom.” Perhaps the stickiest of point of all is Amazon’s policy that restricts employees from speaking negatively in public about the company without prior approval. An Amazon spokesperson explained, “While all employees are welcome to engage constructively with any of the many teams inside Amazon that work on sustainability and other topics, we do enforce our external communications policy and will not allow employees to publicly disparage or misrepresent the company or the hard work of their colleagues who are developing solutions to these hard problems.” Despite the policy, AECJ has decided to publicly criticize Amazon for its climate policies, tweeting, “Hundreds of us decided to stand up to our employer, Amazon. We are scared. But we decided we couldn’t live with ourselves if we let a policy silence us in the face of an issue of such moral gravity like the climate crisis … Workers everywhere must have the right to question their own employer’s contributions and responsibilities in the climate crisis.” + Amazon Employees for Climate Justice + Amazon Via Vox and Wired Image via Shutterstock

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Hundreds of Amazon employees risk jobs to protest company’s climate policies

Church Stone Shelter welcomes hikers in Finland

January 28, 2020 by  
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In the celebrated nature reserve of Kintulammi, Finland, architect Malin Moisio of Tampere-based architecture studio Arkkitehtitoimisto TILASTO has created the Kirkkokiven laavu — the Church Stone Shelter — as a free and welcome respite to hikers. Built mainly from wood and recycled materials, the minimalist and contemporary shelter was inspired by a large natural boulder located close by. The project’s name takes inspiration from the history of the boulder, which once served as a primitive church for local horse shepherds in the 18th century. Developed as part of a network of free shelters in the Kintulammi nature reserve, the Church Stone Shelter primarily serves as a place for rest and meal preparation rather than overnight stays. To improve accessibility, the hiking shelter can also be reached by a wheelchair-accessible path that leads from a nearby parking area. Related: Glowing, celestial-inspired shelter communes with nature in Denmark Constructed from a vertically placed 5-by-5-inch timber frame, the gable-roofed shelter, with its rectangular floor plan, evokes the image of a house with a hearth at its heart. This familiar form, combined with the predominant use of warm-toned timber, gives the shelter its welcoming and cozy quality, while its tall, vaulted ceiling recalls the sacral spaces of a church. Both gable ends are completely open to the outdoors to emphasize a fluid connection with nature; small windows of varying sizes provide carefully framed views of the forest. The use of timber, which is treated with a natural blend of tar and linseed oil, also helps blend the building into its wooded surroundings. The wooden walls were placed atop a plinth made of recycled paving stones. The steeply pitched roof is felted. “The building was developed in cooperation with the city-owned Ekokumppanit Oy and the Parish of Tampere who contributed to the building materials,” the architect said. “All the construction was done on site without electricity, mainly with hand tools. Within a short period of time, the Church Stone Shelter has become an iconic symbol of the Kintulampi Hiking and Nature Reserve.” + Arkkitehtitoimisto TILASTO Photography by Malin Moisio and Julia Kivela? via Arkkitehtitoimisto TILASTO

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Church Stone Shelter welcomes hikers in Finland

Episode 36: Brexit, VW and 21st century environmentalism

July 1, 2016 by  
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This week’s podcast: Times are changing politically across the business landscape and in what’s expected of advocacy groups like the Audubon Society.

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Episode 36: Brexit, VW and 21st century environmentalism

Apple Supplier Pegatron Accused of Employing Minors and Imposing Overtime

July 29, 2013 by  
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US-based non-profit China Labor Watch has just issued a report which finds that three factories making Apple products impose excessive overtime on their workers and employ minors. The advocacy group said on Monday that the plants, run by the Pegatron Group violated Apple’s own standards for workers’ rights. According to the report, 70,000 employees at the three Pegatron sites work an average of 69 hours a week, “many of whom” are minors, while some other workers are interns from vocational schools. Read the rest of Apple Supplier Pegatron Accused of Employing Minors and Imposing Overtime Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: advocacy groups , Apple facilities , Apple factory China , apple human rights , apple products , apple workers , child labor , China Labor Watch , human rights , labor exploitation , labor rights violation , labor standards China , Pegatron        

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Apple Supplier Pegatron Accused of Employing Minors and Imposing Overtime

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