Amsterdam is transforming a prison into a green energy-generating neighborhood

September 13, 2017 by  
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A brighter, solar-powered future is coming to Bijlmerbajes, a former prison complex in Amsterdam . The Dutch government tapped OMA to design a masterplan of the 7.5-hectare site, as well as a significant portion of the 135,000-square-meter mixed-use development. Designed in collaboration with FABRICations architects and LOLA Landscape , the new masterplan will transform the prison complex’s iconic six towers into Bajes Kwartier, an energy-neutral development powered by renewable energy and built largely from recycled materials. Built in the 1970s near the Amsterdam Amstel railways station, the Bijlmerbajes prison complex is a well-known urban landmark that permanently closed in June 2016. The former prison’s six linked towers and administrative building are located in the geographic center of Amsterdam’s new urban development, making it ripe for rebirth as a vibrant civic and cultural space. The new 7.5-hectare Bajes Kwartier development will conceptually preserve Bijlmerbajes’ “island character” and reuse building materials. Prefab elements from the existing walls will be recycled as cladding for the new residential buildings, while prison bars will be recycled into balustrades, and cell doors reused as edge panels for pedestrian bridges. Bajes Kwartier will become a mostly car-free environment and focus on elevating the pedestrian and cyclist experience. The masterplan includes approximately 1,350 residential units that include rentals and luxury condominiums, with 30 percent set aside for affordable housing. All but one of the prison towers will be demolished and the remaining building will be transformed into a “green tower” with a vertical park and urban farming . The centrally located administrative building will be turned into an arts and design center. The mixed-use development will also comprise a restaurant, health center, school, parks, water features, and underground parking lot. Related: OMA gets green light for their first major public building in the UK All the new buildings will be energy-neutral thanks to superior insulation and energy saving design, as well as hookups to solar power, wind power, and biomass power . Nearly 100 percent of the existing building material will be reused or recycled. The project is scheduled to begin in early 2018. + OMA Via ArchDaily

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Amsterdam is transforming a prison into a green energy-generating neighborhood

Awesome new animation envisions Earth in 250 million years

September 13, 2017 by  
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Earth in 250 million years won’t be the planet we know and love today. Plate tectonics theory reveals how plates comprising Earth’s outer shell glide atop the mantle , causing continents to drift apart or come together. Business Insider put together an animation , using projections from Northwestern University adjunct professor Christopher Scotese , to envision Earth millions of years in the future. And it looks like a very different place. In fact, a whole new supercontinent could form. Scotese runs the PALEOMAP Project , which includes a YouTube channel with over 50 computer animations that show “the plate tectonic evolution of the continents and ocean basins during the last billion years.” Business Insider drew on Scotese’s projections to create a video of what Earth could look like in 250 million years. Related: How climate change could alter the environment in 100 years You can watch as some continents join together and others move away from each other, as land masses start to look like they might form a supercontinent. The final image is of a globe with an ocean filling most of one side, and land masses pushed together across the other side as the continents begin to merge. In the description of one of his videos, titled “ 240 million years ago to 250 million years in the future ,” Scotese suggested another Pangea will form 250 million years into the future. He calls it Pangea Proxima. He said in the description of another video, “ Future Plate Motions & Pangea Proxima – Scotese Animation ,” he changed the name of the supercontinent from Pangea Ultima to Pangea Proxima to reflect “the fact that plate tectonics will continue for several more billion years and that other future Pangeas are very likely.” You can see Business Insider’s animated map here . Many more animations of our changing planet can be found on Scotese’s YouTube page . In addition to how plate tectonics might change the globe, Scotese has explored how climate change might alter Earth. Via Business Insider Images via screenshot

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Awesome new animation envisions Earth in 250 million years

Atelier Space turn a 1925 nursery into a daylit solar-powered residence in the Netherlands

May 26, 2017 by  
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Smart adaptive reuse can do wonders with old, abandoned and disused buildings. Dutch firm Atelier Space breathed new life into this 1925 nursery in Leiden, the Netherlands by converting it into a beautiful, daylit residence with amenities, technology and polish worthy of a modern urban home. The architects preserved much of the original 1925 nursery, turned the former gym into an airy, open-plan living, dining, and kitchen area. They also divided a large classroom into three separate bedrooms. Related: Patalab Architects transform dank mechanics garage into light-filled London home The entire residence features 13-foot-high ceilings with restored skylights and windows that bring natural light into the interior. A guesthouse occupies the floor above the living room, and the toilet, technical area, and storage room are all placed on one side. The converted schoolhouse also includes sustainable design features such as rooftop solar panels , improved building insulation, and centrally controlled lighting, climate, shading and security systems that allow occupants to control every aspect the interior environment. To top it all off, a heat pump heats and cools the house. + Atelier Space Via Curbed Photos by Brigitte Kroone

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Atelier Space turn a 1925 nursery into a daylit solar-powered residence in the Netherlands

Decrepit freight depot reborn as industrial-chic food lovers paradise in Malm

April 25, 2017 by  
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Swedish architects Wingårdh dramatically transformed a roofless freight depot into an industrial-chic market hall in Malmö, Sweden. The adaptive reuse and expansion project combines old bricks with Corten steel for a modern look that still pays homage to the 19th century building’s industrial roots. Located on Gibraltargatan, the 1,500-square-meter Malmö Market Hall caters to 20 stalls and cafes that celebrate the city’s melting-pot culture with its diversity of food. Clients Nina Totté Karyd and Martin Karyd commissioned Wingårdh in their quest to create a “food lover’s paradise” inside an abandoned goods warehouse . The clients and architects sought to preserve the building’s historic character while imbuing modern details. “As a visitor you should be transported back in time, yet experience a modern day market, slaughterhouse and dairy,” wrote the clients. Related: MVRDV’s Gorgeous Tunnel-Shaped Market Hall Opens its Doors in Rotterdam In addition to renovating the existing structure, Wingårdh added an extension clad in weathered steel . The new addition mirrors the warehouse’s gabled form and the use of Corten steel mimics the rust-colored hues of the brick facade. A large strip of glass separates the extension from the old brick structure. Adjoining courtyards were built to host farmers markets and alfresco dining. + Wingårdh Via Dezeen Images via Wingårdh

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Decrepit freight depot reborn as industrial-chic food lovers paradise in Malm

Green walls and textured surfaces breathe new life into an abandoned row of shop offices

February 6, 2017 by  
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Singaporean firm L Architects transformed a row of abandoned half-built shop offices into a visually striking developer’s head office and gallery in Johor, Malaysia. The architects preserved the gable roofs and metal-framed structures, relying on material textures and patterns to give new life to the old buildings. The modern adaptive reuse project harmoniously combines a mix of hard concrete, metal decking lines, patterned brickwork, glass, and porous green walls. Located near the Johor Straits across from Singapore, the Series of Barns comprises eight three-story structures built on the grid facing the water. To blend the renovated buildings into the rural landscape, L Architects used natural materials to create a textured tapestry-like facade that’s both eye-catching and well matched with the surroundings. Currently half of the gabled structures are occupied. The unused four structures are kept as spares for future use with their front facades covered in green creepers grown on tensioned wires. The lobby and reception is housed in the gabled structure that protrudes slightly from the rest of the buildings and was built with a large glass curtain wall . The remaining three structures feature brick facades. Related: HHF Architects’ renovated a group of crumbling buildings to help revitalize an entire neighborhood L Architects write: “In this project, we wanted to experiment with various ways how we can use a seemingly modular material like brick to create a texturized façade. An attempt to break the monolithic flat surfaces of the barns. When the sun’s strength is mitigated it creates interesting shadows formed by the playful arrangement of the protruded bricks.” The eight gabled structures are elevated off the ground, providing space for shaded parking spaces underneath. In addition to the lobby, the Series of Barns contains exhibition areas, a small theater room, a conference room, office space , and an outdoor deck. + L Architects Via ArchDaily Images by Muhamad shafiq bin samsuri

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Green walls and textured surfaces breathe new life into an abandoned row of shop offices

Old watermill recycled into modern light-filled refuge in Portugal

February 3, 2017 by  
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Down on the banks of a beautiful creek sits a beautiful and modern refuge that blends in with its environment. Ansião-based architecture practice Bruno Lucas Dias designed this rentable lodge constructed with recycled materials from an old watermill . Nestled in Portugal’s Ponte de São Simão, the contemporary home, called Watermill on the Crag (Moinho das Fragas), was constructed on a modest budget and saves costs with its energy-efficient design. The Watermill on the Crag is largely constructed with natural materials that blend the home into its forested surroundings. Crafted from an old watermill, the building’s external walls are constructed of stone , matching the craggy cliff faces of Saint Simon. “This local lodging project is born out of the respect of the existing language, and aims to requalify the constructions and their context, faithfully respecting, as much as possible, its past use,” write the architects. Related: Water Pumping Mill Transformed Into Self-Sustaining Residence The watermill’s stone exterior was mostly left intact save for new double-glazed wooden window frames and thermal improvements to the roof. In contrast, the interior was largely revamped with white walls and surfaces covered with locally sourced pinewood . The building contains a bedroom that sleeps two, a bathroom, and open-plan living room, dining area, and kitchen, as well as an outdoor terrace with views of the mountains and creek. + Bruno Lucas Dias Images by Hugo Santos Silva

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Old watermill recycled into modern light-filled refuge in Portugal

Cramped historic palace in Spain renovated as a light-filled community center

January 19, 2017 by  
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The new Cultural Center Casal Balaguer in Spain’s Palma de Mallorca is a wonderful example of how historic buildings can be adapted into today’s society. Barcelona-based Flores & Prats Architects and local Palma firm Duch-Pizá teamed up to convert the privately-owned 14th century palace into a thriving, light-filled community center. Using the sprawling layout to guide the design, the team created a building plan that would focus on maintaining some of the structure’s original character while injecting some modern-day features. Although the building had undergone various renovations over the years, the architects were determined to maintain as much of its “accumulated” character as possible. Related: Plush green-roofed cultural center replaces 2004 Olympic Games facilities in Athens Due to the cramped location of the palace, the architects had to get creative when it came to renovating the space for public use. Specifically, the rooftop had an especially significant role in the design because the structure is surrounded by narrow alleyways, reducing the possibilities of using large exterior windows to let in natural light. This limitation led the architects to use the roof as a principal design feature , interspersing sloping zinc panels into the typical Spanish ceramic tiles. The asymmetrical style of the roof outline comprised a strategic decision to filter in as much daylight as possible. Keeping in mind the building’s new use as a public space, opening up the interior space and creating clear circulation routes though the building was a priority. Once the rooms were open and spaces defined, various skylights were installed to bring in even more natural light , helping to reduce the building’s energy usage. Unfortunately, the original ceilings were in very bad shape and had to be replaced with exposed wooden beams . The large inverted wooden ceilings enhance the original arched doorways found throughout the gallery spaces and in the library. Inside, a monolithic concrete staircase leads up to the building’s rooftop terrace, letting visitors experience the building in its entirety. + Flores & Prats Architects + Duch-Pizá Via Archdaily Photography by Adrià Goula

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Cramped historic palace in Spain renovated as a light-filled community center

Former factory site in rural Amsterdam to be reborn as a modern neighborhood

November 28, 2016 by  
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Located between two dikes and a centuries-old street with traditional Dutch houses, Klein Kadoelen will overlook beautiful views of the nearly 600-year-old Wilmkebreekpolder, a reclaimed meadow/polder in the middle of the district. The residential development will consist of 48 dwellings arranged in a layout informed by the existing topography for an organic feel. The houses are densely clustered together separated by small brick-lined streets and alleys that can lead to unexpected expanses of landscape. A public square will be located at the heart of the development and abundant landscaping knits the neighborhood together. Related: Daan Roosegaarde uses light art to breathe new life into an iconic Dutch dike Inspired by the surroundings neighborhoods, the Klein Kadoelen houses will feature gabled roofs , timber construction, and a natural color palette of whites, grays, blues, and greens to match the landscape. A variety of housing types will give the new neighborhood visual interest and character. “[It’s] a beautiful location, hidden in the neighborhood, between the large urban developments on the IJ and the unique ‘Waterland’ nature reserve north of Amsterdam,” write DELVA Landscape Architects. “The core of this plan is to blend the neighborhood in to a natural, sustainable way in the existing urban and rural context.” The project’s first phase is expected to be complete in early 2018. + DELVA Landscape Architects/Urbanism + Houben/Van Mierlo Images via DELVA Landscape Architects/Urbanism

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Former factory site in rural Amsterdam to be reborn as a modern neighborhood

Tokyo factory is transformed into an industrial-chic Blue Bottle Coffee cafe

November 7, 2016 by  
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Topped with a triangular roof, the Blue Bottle Coffee Nakameguro Cafe comprises a cafe on the first floor, as well as a tasting room and a workshop—two kinds of spaces new to Blue Bottle. Wooden countertops, an open floor plan , plants, and transparency temper industrial elements, such as the tall ceilings and concrete surfaces. The coffeehouse serves a community gathering space for workshops or coffee sampling sessions. The Blue Bottle Coffee teams from Japan and the U.S. occupy the upper two floors. Related: Tokyo’s first multistory building made of 100% wood overcomes rigid fire regulations “Since this neighborhood is located far from the station, the streets are lined with many unique and small-sized shops,” writes the architect. “In order to continue the sense of small scale into the space, floors are divided in a stepped-floor style, while utilizing the existing openings formerly used for loading/unloading and storing. Horizontal pivot windows installed on the front glass façade help defining the boundary between the interior and the surrounding environment, while establishing a visual relationship of “see and be seen” so that people become aware of each other’s presence wherever they are in the space.” + Schemata Architecture Office Images via Schemata Architecture Office , by Takumi Ota

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Tokyo factory is transformed into an industrial-chic Blue Bottle Coffee cafe

Nature-filled office takes over a former factory building in Amsterdam-Noord

October 28, 2016 by  
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Located in an emerging neighborhood of Amsterdam-Noord, the 1,600-square-meter renovated warehouse consists of a spacious industrial hall and office space. The architects removed all the interior walls and installed large windows along the facade to open the building up to views of the street and to bring in natural light, which also streams in through the existing factory skylights. Three transparent greenhouses filled with tropical plants and fish sit below the skylights and divide the open-plan office into two halves. The 50-square-meter glazed gardens improve indoor air quality, provide a cooling microclimate, and serve as a calming oasis in the post-industrial office. Related: Sweden’s house-in-a-greenhouse grows food sustainably with recycled wastewater “Extruded from three of the existing roof lights, they echo the scale and logic of what was already there,” write the architects about the glazed gardens. “Next to express the Joolz ideology by providing a pleasant backdrop for the daily routines, these large glazed gardens also improve the internal climate and provide employees with some more exotic choices to pick as their work locations for the day.” Worktables are placed next to the gardens, but benches are also nestled inside the gardens to let employees immerse themselves in nature. The Joolz project has been nominated for the Arc Awards 2016. + Space Encounters Via Dezeen Images via Space Encounters

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Nature-filled office takes over a former factory building in Amsterdam-Noord

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