Hyperloop TT plans to build working line in the UAE next year

April 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Hyperloop TT plans to build working line in the UAE next year

It’s been a busy week for Hyperloop Transportation Technologies (HyperloopTT): they began building a test track in France , and now they’ve just announced the signing of an agreement with Aldar Properties , a Abu Dhabi real estate developer, for what HyperloopTT described as “the first commercial Hyperloop system in the UAE .” Hyperloop plans to start construction next year, with the first section open by 2020. ? Aldar Properties and HyperloopTT signed a memorandum of understanding for a commercial Hyperloop system, including a Hyperloop Visitor Center and HyperloopTT’s XO Square Innovation Center. This agreement will allow the California-based company to start building an around six-mile Hyperloop system. The site is near the border between Abu Dhabi and Dubai , near the Al Maktoum International Airport and the location for Expo 2020 . In fact, HyperloopTT chairman Bibop Gresta said with regulatory support, they aim to have the first Hyperloop section operational in time for the expo. Related: HyperloopTT is building the world’s third Hyperloop test track in France Aldar Properties CEO Talal Al Dhiyebi said in the statement, “We believe that Hyperloop technology can have a major positive impact on the lives of all those living within our communities, and we look forward to this possibility becoming a reality.” HyperloopTT said they would build the Hyperloop system in several phases, and although this agreement covers a six-mile system, they ultimately aim to construct a commercial network throughout the UAE. They said they’ve been working in the country since 2016, and have finished a comprehensive feasibility study, working with Abu Dhabi’s Department of Transportation. HyperloopTT CEO Dirk Ahlborn said, “With this historic agreement in Abu Dhabi, we take a big step towards the world’s first commercial system.” This isn’t the first time cities in the United Arab Emirates have shown an interest in Hyperloop technology; in 2016, Hyperloop One (now Virgin Hyperloop One ) signed an agreement with Dubai’s Roads and Transit Authority to evaluate a Hyperloop system in the area. Earlier this year, Virgin Hyperloop One and Dubai’s Roads and Transit Authority unveiled a commuter pod prototype . + Hyperloop Transportation Technologies + Aldar Properties Images via Hyperloop Transportation Technologies

Continued here:
Hyperloop TT plans to build working line in the UAE next year

This new green-roofed hotel with mirrored walls blends into Uruguay’s mountains

April 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on This new green-roofed hotel with mirrored walls blends into Uruguay’s mountains

Visitors to Uruguay’s Maldonado region can soon stay in a stunning new hotel, which is tucked into 250 acres of gorgeous natural landscape. The Sacromonte Landscape Hotel  — designed by local firm MAPA Architects — is a green-roofed mountain retreat that uses mirrored exteriors to strategically blend into its surroundings. The sustainable hotel complex, which is comprised of 13 individual cabins, a winery and a farm-to-table restaurant, was completely prefabricated off site to reduce the project’s footprint. MAPA Architects utilized a variety of strategies to enable the Sacromonte Landscape Hotel to blend into the environment. The buildings’ sizes and height were kept subtle as to not disrupt the amazing landscape. The cabins have a mirrored facade on one side that camouflages the buildings into the grassy meadows. The rear side of the cabins feature locally-sourced timber trunks and local stones, creating a rustic look. Related: This modern hiking hotel blends into the dark alpine forests of Italy To keep the project’s footprint at a minimum, the structures were prefabricated off site in 10 weeks in a factory in Montevideo. In fact, the overall design focused on implementing various sustainable construction techniques. In addition to using prefab manufacturing, the structures were built with low-E glass and built on bases made from locally-sourced stone. Eco-friendly wastewater treatment systems were also installed to make the project as green as possible. The eco-resort  just recently opened for business and is expected to be fully operational by September, 2018. Visitors will be able to reserve individual cabins, which come with private decks and circular pools for enjoying the spectacular views. Inside, guests can enjoy the modern design, including dark stone floors and oak-paneled walls. For dining, the hotel restaurant offers dishes made with vegetables and fruits grown onsite in an organic garden. And of course, wine tastings are offered daily. + MAPA Architects + Sacromonte Landscape Hotel Via Dwell Photography by Leonardo Finotti

More here:
This new green-roofed hotel with mirrored walls blends into Uruguay’s mountains

Jean Nouvel-designed Louvre Abu Dhabi set to open in November

September 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Jean Nouvel-designed Louvre Abu Dhabi set to open in November

Jean Nouvel ‘s Louvre Abu Dhabi – the first universal museum in the Arab world – will open its doors to the public on November 11th. Nestled underneath a huge porous dome, the museum galleries will house an extensive collection of artworks, artifacts and loans from France’s top museums, with a particular focus on shared human stories across civilizations and cultures. The project is part of a 2007 intergovernmental agreement between France and the United Arab Emirates . Its 8,000 square feet of exhibition space will house permanent collections and temporary exhibits, combining artifacts and artworks from France’s top museums. Related: Jean Nouvel’s Louvre Abu Dhabi is a museum that is its own work of art The museum’s most distinctive feature is its vast dome comprised of almost 8,000 unique metal stars set in a complex geometric pattern. This porous structure filters sunlight and creates a ‘rain of light’ effect reminiscent of overlapping palm trees in the UAE’s oases. Two prestigious events coproduced under the French-Emirati Cultural Program will mark the inauguration week. These events were initiated over a year ago by the two countries and supported by the creative momentum generated by the Louvre Abu Dhabi. + Jean Nouvel + Louvre Abu Dhabi Images by Muhamed Somji

See original here: 
Jean Nouvel-designed Louvre Abu Dhabi set to open in November

University of Queensland scientists uncover an ‘explosion’ of new life forms

September 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on University of Queensland scientists uncover an ‘explosion’ of new life forms

The Tree of Life just got bigger. University of Queensland scientists found thousands of organisms that don’t into any known phylum. They acquired 7,280 bacterial genomes and 623 archaeal genomes, raising the number of known genomes by nearly 10 percent. Scientist Gene Tyson, who was part of the effort, said, “The real value of these genomes is that many are evolutionarily distinct from previously recovered genomes.” There are some 80,000 genomes in genome repositories, according to the university. This new work, published online in September by Nature Microbiology , recovers almost 8,000 genomes – what the university called an explosion in the number of life forms we know about. Related: Tree of Life redesigned to reflect thousands of new species The scientists drew on the technique metagenomics, which is relatively new, according to Futurism. Researchers sequenced all the DNA in a sample – including water, feces, or dirt – to generate a metagenome. They were then able to reconstruct individual genomes of new bacteria and new archaea . Around a third of those microorganisms were distinct, allowing the researchers to create three archaeal phyla and 17 bacterial phyla. Microbes can be hard to scrutinize; scientists can only culture under one percent, according to Tyson. Utilizing metagenomics may offer a new method of studying microorganisms researchers can’t grow in a laboratory – and such research could be vital as microbes are opposing our life-saving antibiotics , and we face antibiotic resistance . According to Futurism, it’s possible some of these new species could be used in better antibiotics. And there could be more discoveries to come – study lead author Donovan Parks said in a statement, “We anticipate that processing of environmental samples deposited in other public repositories will add tens of thousands of additional microbial genomes to the tree of life.” Via Futurism and the University of Queensland Images via Pixabay and Parks, Donovan, et al.

See the rest here:
University of Queensland scientists uncover an ‘explosion’ of new life forms

BIG releases video sneak peek of Hyperloop designed to connect Abu Dhabi & Dubai

October 24, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on BIG releases video sneak peek of Hyperloop designed to connect Abu Dhabi & Dubai

Dutch architecture firm Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) has released a teaser video showing off its design of a Hyperloop project that promises to link Abu Dhabi and Dubai . The ultra high-speed capsule transport aims to turn the 93-mile trip between the two busy cities into a minutes-long commute, offering an efficient means of moving both people and cargo. Jakob Lange, a partner and head of BIG Ideas (the design firm’s tech division), leads the video sneak peek ahead of the Hyperloop design’s November 7 unveiling. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ypab90bc1Yw BIG ’s design is the result of a partnership with Hyperloop One (formerly Hyperloop Technologies), which is one of the two companies racing to build the first working Hyperloop track in the United States. Hyperloop One recently tapped BIG to aid in the design of its Hyperloop plans for the United Arab Emirates, with architecture and engineering firms AECOM and Arup on board to translate the technology into actual infrastructure. Related: Hyperloop One raises $50M and hires former Uber CFO as an advisor “We are in a new time now where you can develop a new transportation system in very few years and change the world,” said Lange in the video. “We’re not waiting for new technology like carbon nanofibers or anything in order to do this. We have everything we need to do it.” BIG’s design involves Y-shaped supports that elevate the Hyperloop itself, a track that carries high-speed passenger pods from one stop to the next at speeds over 700 miles per hour. The technology behind Hyperloop One’s UAE project may not be that different from tests of its propulsion system in the Nevada desert, where the proof-of-concept prototype reached 116mph in a staggering 1.1 seconds this past May. Still, there is a lot we don’t know about how the UAE track will be built, when construction might begin or end, and how much the project will cost. BIG’s teaser video offers an early peek at the design, with more coming on November 7, but even that could change in response to the demands of the still-emerging technology. Via Dezeen Images via BIG

View original post here:
BIG releases video sneak peek of Hyperloop designed to connect Abu Dhabi & Dubai

The cost of solar power has fallen 25% in just five months

October 6, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on The cost of solar power has fallen 25% in just five months

The future is looking sunny for solar as the clean, renewable energy source gets cheaper – and fast. In just five months, the cost of solar plummeted an incredible 25 percent as demonstrated by two recent construction bids for solar projects in China and Abu Dhabi. On August 11 a bid of $0.46/W was put forward to build 500 megawatts of solar power in China and on September 19 a record low bid of $0.023/kWh was submitted for 1.2 gigawatts of solar power in Abu Dhabi. China and Abu Dhabi are not the only places in the world seeing dramatic decreases in the cost of solar. A 100 MW solar project in Nevada recently submitted for approval would deliver electricity at $0.04 per kilowatt-hour (kWh). That is the lowest price ever seen for a US solar farm and much lower than the price of electricity for a new coal, nuclear or natural gas power plant. Related: Average cost of solar and wind energy could fall by 59% in the next decade A new report from the US Department of Energy found that the cost of clean energy technologies has fallen 41 to 94 percent over the past seven years. The report looked at wind, residential solar, utility-scale solar, batteries and LED lighting and found that all of the clean energy technologies experienced dramatic price decreases from 2008 to 2015. Wind and solar accounted for two-thirds of new energy installations in the US in 2015. The report found that utility-scale solar farm costs have fallen by 64 percent since 2008 and distributed solar costs have fallen by 54 percent. “We’re still learning how to further reduce the cost of solar cells and other components, as well as operation and maintenance costs,” said Frank Wouters, former director of Masdar Clean Energy . “There’s no reason why the cost of solar will ever increase again.” Via Futurism Images via Wikimedia

Continued here:
The cost of solar power has fallen 25% in just five months

Is Zika the real cause of microcephaly in Brazil? New study raises questions

October 6, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Is Zika the real cause of microcephaly in Brazil? New study raises questions

The massive microcephaly outbreak that rocked Brazil last year has confounded researchers who are trying to understand the cause. Although most scientists think there is a connection between the Zika virus and the huge spike in microcephaly cases in Brazil, a new study of Zika-infected mothers in Colombia casts doubt on this theory, because out of 12,000 confirmed cases of zika-infected pregnant women, none had babies born with microcephaly. Many take for granted that the Zika virus is the cause of the spate of microcephaly in Brazil, especially since in April the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed a causal relationship between them. But in June, the New England Complex Systems Institute (NESCI) released a report examining the rate of microcephaly cases in Brazil per Zika-infected mothers, against microcephaly in Colombia in Zika-infected mothers and found the rates to be vastly different. If Zika infection in the first trimester of prenatal development was the sole cause of microcephaly in infants, scientists would expect the rates of microcephaly to be much higher in other areas where the Zika virus has hit hard, such as Colombia . This new study indicates such is not the case. There is also a huge difference between rates of microcephaly in certain areas of Brazil versus others , with the microcephaly “epicenter” being the city of Recife, Pernambuco in the Northeast. Other areas of Brazil have seen a lot of Zika infections and not nearly the same rates of microcephaly, which indicates that there might be some other cause of microcephaly, or perhaps even multiple causes in addition to Zika virus . Earlier this year, a group of Argentine doctors suggested the pesticide pyriproxyfen might actually be causing the microcephaly epidemic. Inhabitat spoke with three experts about the possible links between pyriproxyfen and microcephaly or the Zika virus and microcephaly, in an effort to better understand emerging theories. In February, an Argentinian organization called Red Universitaria de Ambiente y Salud published a report from Medicos de Pueblos Fumigados, or Physicians in the Crop-Sprayed Town , that raised concern over pyriproxyfen put in drinking water by the State. Pyriproxyfen affects developmental processes in mosquitoes , and some wonder if the chemical is somehow triggering a similar reaction in humans. Related: Experimental Zika vaccine to be tested on humans for the first time So what do we know about pyriproxyfen? First off, it’s manufactured by Japanese company Sumitomo Chemical , a company that is not owned by Monsanto but has collaborated with them in the past . Second, the World Health Organization (WHO) approved its use, and the government began to add pyriproxyfen to drinking water in Brazilian favelas at the end of 2014. So the timing checks out, according to Dr. Yaneer Bar-Yam, founder of the New England Complex Systems Institute (NECSI), which has written their own reports on the Zika virus, microcephaly, and pyriproxyfen. The villages where pyriproxyfen was added weren’t monitored, Bar-Yam said, nor were pregnancies in those villages. He said, “All they did was test its effect on mosquitoes.” The doctors said in their report that pyriproxyfen has been used in areas where people infected with the Zika virus live, and that other Zika virus epidemics in the past weren’t linked to birth defects. Pyriproxyfen has not been linked decisively to microcephaly, but there may be reason for further research. The bulk of testing on pyriproxyfen has been carried out by Sumitomo, according to Bar-Yam. He said while there was evidence the pesticide affected the brain mass of rat fetuses, the testers could say those results weren’t important because they didn’t meet certain criteria. Specifically, as doses increase, the effects must worsen. In Sumitomo tests, a dose of pyriproxyfen in the middle of the study showed more problems in rats than at later points in the study where the rats were given more of the pesticide. “There are a lot of reasons why that might have been true, such as dosage variability or DNA variability. It’s hard to tell whether those tests are actually good tests,” Bar-Yam told Inhabitat. “Imagine if you have something that might have an effect in 1 percent of babies, or in 1 in 100 babies, if you test it only on 100 rats, you might not see the effect. In the studies they tested pyriproxyfen only on several dozen rats. It’s very hard to tell if the studies transfer from rats to people; the study is a very limited probe of what’s going on.” A study done by four Oregon State University researchers published in September in the journal Environmental Pollution found pyriproxyfen led to “adverse morphological effects” in zebrafish. The researchers concluded “developmental toxicity of pyriproxyfen may not be limited to insects.” Bar-Yam pointed out WHO’s approval doesn’t necessarily mean the pesticide is safe. “One could argue that WHO followed the standard protocol for approval of an insecticide, but that doesn’t mean the protocol is safe. There are other instances where it failed,” he said. “For example, methoprene was approved as insecticide , but now has been shown to cause development disorders in mammals. Pyriproxyfen and methoprene are in the same family of chemical. The fact that we have a member of the same family of chemicals known to cause the same problems in development doesn’t prove pyriproxyfen does but again surely raises the question of do we know enough.” There are claims that pyriproxyfen has not been used in Recife, described in a NECSI report as a microcephaly epicenter. According to their report, however, those making the claims don’t distinguish between “the metropolitan area of Recife, where it is widely used, and the municipality, where it is not.” According to Dr. Margaret “Peggy” Honein of the CDC, pyriproxyfen has been “used for decades” without being linked to microcephaly. “Studies have found evidence of Zika virus in the brains of newborns with microcephaly. This strongly supports a causal link between Zika and microcephaly,” Honein told Inhabitat. She is the lead for the Pregnancy and Birth Defects Task Force for the Zika Response, and is a co-author on the preliminary report on the Zika virus in Colombia published by The New England Journal of Medicine . “Exposure to pyriproxyfen would not explain these study results showing the presence of Zika virus in the brains of infants born with microcephaly.” Why wouldn’t the Zika virus be the clear cause of microcephaly, if it has been found in babies’ brains? According to Bar-Yam, “The rate at which microcephaly cases are linked to Zika is quite low. The problem is the additional pieces of information that would let us conclude Zika is causing microcephaly are not adding up.” In Brazil, there are over 1,500 confirmed cases of microcephaly potentially related to the Zika virus. Researchers eagerly awaited data from Colombia , where Zika virus infections have been better reported than in Brazil, according to Bar-Yam. The CDC and Instituto Nacional de Salud in Colombia supported a study based on the data. The Colombia study didn’t yield easy answers, however. Up to April 2, 2016, 65,726 cases of Zika Virus Disease were reported, and 2,485, or 4 percent, were confirmed. 11,944 pregnant women in Colombia were reported with the Zika virus, with 1,484, or 12 percent, confirmed. The researchers looked at a group of 1,850 pregnant women, and over 90 percent of the women who were reported infected with the Zika virus in their third trimester had delivered their babies. Microcephaly had not been identified in any of those babies. Between January 1, 2016, and April 28, 2016, 50 infants with possible microcephaly cases were reported to the “national surveillance system.” Over half of those cases – 26 – were still under investigation when the report was written. 20 cases were linked to other causes, not the Zika virus. Four of the cases were linked potentially to the Zika virus through “laboratory evidence,” but none of the mothers had symptoms of Zika Virus Disease during pregnancy. In this abstract of the article in the conclusion, the researchers wrote , “Preliminary surveillance data in Colombia suggest that maternal infection with the Zika virus during the third trimester of pregnancy is not linked to structural abnormalities in the fetus.” Bar-Yam said the fact that we can’t make the Colombia data work with the Brazil data, where there are so many more cases of microcephaly potentially linked to the Zika virus but where the data may not be as reliable or complete, makes it “hard to draw a definitive conclusion.” Dr. Leslie Lobel, a leading virologist who has studied the Zika virus where it originally emerged in Uganda, gave the numbers some perspective by comparing the microcephaly outbreak with that of the German measles epidemic. “From all evidence, it appears the Zika virus is related to the side effects. It happens a small percentage of the time, maybe 20 to 25 percent. In perspective, with the German measles epidemic, there were malformations 100 percent of time,” Lobel told Inhabitat. He pointed out that while there appears to be a “preponderance of evidence that seems to indicate a relationship between Zika infections and microcephaly,” there are other factors involved. Dengue fever is also circulating in Brazil, and Lobel said those with Zika have often been infected with dengue either before or at the same time as with Zika, which could “dampen the immune response [to Zika] or accelerate it.” Microcephaly can be caused by other elements as well. “CDC is investigating other factors such as another infection occurring at the same time as Zika virus infection, nutrition, or the presence of symptoms that might affect the risk for birth defects,” said Honein. “Other known causes of microcephaly can include rubella, cytomegalovirus, or toxoplasmosis infections during pregnancy; severe malnutrition; interruption of blood supply to the developing brain; or exposure to harmful substances such as alcohol and certain drugs and toxic chemicals.” All three experts Inhabitat spoke with said the Zika virus is likely connected to microcephaly. But the Zika virus may not be the only factor. “It’s a little bit surprising that we would be in situation where at the same time two new things are both causing microcephaly. It’s not what you’d expect, but is it possible? Yes,” said Bar-Yam. “The point we’re making is not that we know pyriproxyfen is causing microcephaly, but that there’s a reason to look for another cause based on the available data, and there’s a reason to suspect pyriproxyfen might have a role because of its biological mechanism.” Lobel said we need more testing on chemicals. “In small quantities you often don’t see problems but in big quantities the problems come out,” he said. He also called for more research on viruses . “Nixon shifted funds away from virus research to cancer research. Now with global warming and globalization, we see the emergence of diseases once confined to one part of world,” said Lobel. “We’ve slept on this for many, many years. Viruses never sleep but we sleep.” Another step would be the development of a vaccine , but that’s easier said than done. “The problem with developing a vaccine is that the government wants it yesterday but we know so little about what reaction of the immune system to the virus causes the side effects,” said Lobel. “We need more research into the immune response to the virus.” Furthermore, he said we should consider ecosystems more in our research of viruses and ways to combat them. “There are potential side effects of chemicals or technology, such as what happens when you remove insects from the environment? I tend to believe you shouldn’t be doing that; there is a delicate balance in an ecosystem,” he said. “Right now the developing world is out of balance with the ecosystem with the sudden entry of something new in semi-sterile environment where viruses go wild. Right now there is no balance between the viruses and the environment. We need a deeper understanding of ecosystems.” “I think eventually the truth will come out,” said Bar-Yam. “One might argue there’s a reason for some people to be concerned. If microcephaly is caused by a disease transmitted by mosquitoes, no one’s at fault. If it turns out pyriproxyfen is involved in microcephaly, people will be held accountable for it.” Images via Wikimedia Commons , Free Stock Photos , Wikimedia ( 1 , 2 , 3 ), garycycles8 on Flickr , Latin American Science , Pexels , and dany13 on Flickr .

Here is the original:
Is Zika the real cause of microcephaly in Brazil? New study raises questions

Abu Dhabi bid sets astounding new low price for solar power

September 21, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Abu Dhabi bid sets astounding new low price for solar power

Just one month after the price of solar power in Chile dropped to half the cost of coal, a new record low price has already been established. A solar plant in Abu Dhabi fetched a bid of just 2.42 cents per kilowatt hour , edging out Chile’s previous record of 2.91 cents. The new price, offered by a consortium of Chinese solar panel manufacturer JinkoSolar and Japan-based company Marubeni, is for a solar plant initially planned for a capacity of 350 megawatts (twice the size of the Chilean project), but the final result may be even larger. Embed from Getty Images PV Magazine broke the news of the bid, which marks the lowest price ever bid for solar power anywhere on Earth. The Abu Dhabi Electricity and Water Authority’s (ADWEA) tender accepted the bid for the plant, destined for the town of Swaihan northwest of Abu Dhabi. ADWEA requested bids for a 350MW solar plant, but allowed bidders to increase the size of the project, so the actual build could wind up being larger than initially planned. The new ultra-low bid is attached to a project much larger than the initial 350MW, a senior representative of Middle East Solar Industry Association (MESIA) told PV Magazine. Related: Chile’s solar price hits record global low–at half the price of coal Although the JinkoSolar/Marubeni bid is the lowest ever made, the super low price has not yet been accepted, as the auction is still ongoing. Reportedly, ADWEA is also evaluating a competing bid from a consortium of Masdar, Abu Dhabi’s energy company, EDF Energies Nouvelles and PAL Group, but the price of that bid has not been released. The new world record low price bid by JinkoSolar and Marubeni is an historic event, but the per-kilowatt-hour price is only one factor officials must weigh in order to determination which consortium will develop the solar plant. Via PV Magazine Lead image via Shutterstock

Originally posted here:
Abu Dhabi bid sets astounding new low price for solar power

Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects design a sustainable new benchmark for Stavanger

September 21, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects design a sustainable new benchmark for Stavanger

Located near Stavanger Central Station and adjacent to the future “Tivoliparken” city park, the 18,170-square-meter tower occupies a highly visible site, and is thus designed to interweave with the urban fabric. The building is accessible on three sides and its main entrance, which faces the future green park, will invite passersby into publicly accessible space with a mixed-use program including a cafe, restaurant, canteen, lobby, flexible performance spaces, multifunctional exhibitions, and events space across two levels. The tower will also house a church, currently located on the site, on floors 3 to 5; however, the majority of the 26-story building will be used for office space. The top two floors will be open to the public and offer spectacular panoramic views as well as conference facilities, restaurants, bars, and public space. Related: Undulating Green-Roofed Hotel Opens in Norway The sleek modern building blends contemporary elements with “a clear Scandinavian architectural reference.” Vertical aluminum and glass panels clad the exterior and pour natural light into the over 1,000 workspaces. “The building design is optimized to the highest degree of user-friendliness and energy efficiency ,” write the architects. “Green terraces at different heights and orientations bring a distinct recognizable character to this new high-rise in Stavanger, which will be one of the highest in Norway.” + Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Images via Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects

View original here: 
Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects design a sustainable new benchmark for Stavanger

Benoy’s new masterplan for Abu Dhabi park features a sheltered "urban forest"

September 14, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Benoy’s new masterplan for Abu Dhabi park features a sheltered "urban forest"

Architecture firm Benoy released first images of their design for Abu Dhabi’s amazing Sheikha Fatima Bint Mubarak Park. The renovation master plan, expected to be completed by 2018, will feature a sheltered “urban forest”, a co-working hub, cycling tracks, play areas, fitness zones and a large amphitheater for performances and events. The park will transform the former Khalidya Ladies Park in  Abu Dhabi into a vibrant urban space and a mix of state-of-the-art features, activities and events. In addition to transformative spaces, the design will include a variety of sustainable features. It is expected to become a symbol of economic diversification and growth. Related: Benoy Architects Top Taiwan High Speed Rail’s Hsin Chu Station Mall with a Lush Green Roof “Benoy is fiercely proud of its expertise in drawing different communities together with spaces that disrupt the norm, surprise and delight and allow people to enjoy them in their own way,” said Paul Priest, Director and Head of Benoy’s MENA Studios. + Benoy Via World Architecture News

Read the original here:
Benoy’s new masterplan for Abu Dhabi park features a sheltered "urban forest"

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1200 access attempts in the last 7 days.