Light-filled Danish home with flexible interiors welcomes the forest indoors

July 28, 2017 by  
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Who needs wallpaper when you’ve got exquisitely framed forest views in almost every room? C.F. Møller Architects designed Villa Rypen, a 158-square-meter dwelling that blurs the lines between indoor and outdoor living. Built on the edge of a forest in Aarhus , Denmark, this light-filled home offers a lovely contemporary living environment with large glazed openings that offer front-row seats to nature’s changing seasons. Villa Rypen has a rectangular footprint with two roughly triangular outdoor terraces that extend to the garden in the southeast and the forest to the northwest. The single-story interior centers on an open-plan living, dining, and kitchen space that offers easy access to both terraces. Floor-to-ceiling glazing frames views of the garden and forest and allows ample amounts of natural light indoors. Sliding doors give the family the flexibility to change the living environment as they please. One such option is turning one of the living spaces into an extra bedroom for a maximum of three east-facing bedrooms. Related: C.F. Møller Architects designs Danish school that optimizes learning through design “Large window sections in a serrated design idiom ensure an inflow of light from several directions, and the view of the forest is exquisitely framed, to provide a unique backdrop to the living rooms in the house,” wrote the architects. The home is built with timber and a terra-cotta tilec screen facade to blend into the forested landscape. + C.F. Møller Architects Via ArchDaily Images © Julian Weyer

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Light-filled Danish home with flexible interiors welcomes the forest indoors

Bespoke curved bricks create a sculptural green-roofed villa by the sea

November 22, 2016 by  
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The 180-square-meter Villa Platan comprises four rectangular units carefully placed along existing landscape contours. The architects seamlessly merge the four units with slender, curved passageways constructed from handmade bricks. Three of the units curve around an outdoor courtyard with a beach meadow garden that faces the sea. The sandy gray-colored Kolumba brick facade, oak-framed windows, landscaped roof , and layout of the low-lying volumes draw inspiration from the surroundings. Related: Circular Infinite Bridge provides panoramic views in Aarhus, Denmark The villa is largely closed off to the street save for the prominent entrance door. Towards the sea and garden, however, the villa opens up with large floor-to-ceiling windows framing views of the sea and sky. The interior features curved white walls and broad plank floors for smooth transitions between volumes. Handmade timber furniture is built into all individual rooms: a bookcase that spans the entire wall of a living room; a customized kitchen; a lamallae wall in the entrance that opens up to the basement and wardrobe; and a full cabinet wall in the master bedroom. The basement houses three guest rooms and a TV room, all of which are illuminated by natural daylight from outdoor light wells hidden beneath slatted oak benches. + ADEPT Via ArchDaily Images © Jakob Lerche

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Bespoke curved bricks create a sculptural green-roofed villa by the sea

Sweden is cutting its tax on solar energy by 98 percent

November 22, 2016 by  
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With innovations like electric roads and zero-energy housing complexes , Sweden is usually thought of as a country at the forefront of the clean energy revolution. But when the government introduced a solar tax earlier in 2016, critics warned said the country was taking a huge step in the wrong direction. Now the government has announced plans to slash the controversial tax. The disputed solar tax would not necessarily have hurt families with solar panels on their home roofs, but rather companies with large arrays. The tax targeted solar energy production greater than 255 kilowatts (kW). But according to Reuters, the government opposition and environmental experts disapproved of the tax, and the government is now backpedaling on the move. Related: Sweden’s legendary ICEHOTEL taps solar power to stay open year-round The tax can’t be completely eliminated for technical reasons, according to Reuters, but in 2017 the Swedish government will reduce the tax by 98 percent. According to Swedish publication Dina Pengar , the tax will be reduced from 29.2 cents per kilowatt hour (kWh) to 0.5 cents per kilowatt hour, and facilities generating under 255 kW will be exempt. In a statement, Finance Minister Magdalena Andersson said, “This allows for rapid investments (in solar energy), while our long-term ambition is to completely remove the tax on solar electricity.” The government had said they originally introduced the tax to meet European Union standards, but the European Commission later said that wasn’t accurate. According to Sweden’s official website , total installed solar capacity in the country in 2015 was 79.4 megawatts. In late October, an official said the country would likely be able to generate all its energy by 2040 with renewable sources. Just last year, Sweden was able to obtain 57 percent of their energy from renewables, including wind and hydropower . Via Reuters Images via Daniel Julià Lundgren on Flickr and La Citta Vita on Flickr

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Sweden is cutting its tax on solar energy by 98 percent

Eindhoven’s dazzling GLOW Festival blends technology and design

November 22, 2016 by  
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With Philips as their main sponsor, the annual festival sheds new light on the latest technologies the company has to offer by showcasing light installations, some mapped onto public building facades and others that visitors are encouraged to interact with. Visited by more than 730.000 people, the festival features two walking routes: the Science Route, a walking loop of 2.20 miles across the Eindhoven University of Technology (TUe) campus and the City Route, another of 2.6 miles path through the city center. Related: Eindhoven’s annual Glow Festival set the city aglow with hundreds of LED installations Featured at TUe, Tom Dekyvere’ s “Cortex Machine” was a whimsical yet simple installation inspired by the intricate interrelations of geometric patterns interwoven in the brain. Back in the city we spotted Boiten & Thunissen’s “WannaPlay” , a giant interactive instrument made from 16 swings with luminary seats, connected to synths and forming a dissonant orchestra.  Catharina Church’ s historical facade was turned into a giant canvas mapped by Dutch artist Hieronymus Bosch ’s hypnotic world in commemoration of his death 500 years ago and accompanied by Verdi’s dramatic  “Dies Irae” . At the design gallery and restaurant Kazerne , Simon Rycroft & Paul Thursfield ‘s “Lightfall” comprised an immersive landscape of vertical LED stripes that respond to movement. Bright installations and projections weren’t the only thing GLOW had to offer this year. Van Abbemuseum’s bridge across the Dommel River was also illuminated with alternating colored lights and Gianni Colombo ‘s “Project Spezio Elastico” (1967), an immersive room with a fluorescent grid, challenged guests’ perception of reality. Eindhoven’s 2016 GLOW festival ran from November 12 to 19. + GLOW Photos by Ana Lisa Alperovich for Inhabitat

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Eindhoven’s dazzling GLOW Festival blends technology and design

Denmark is building the "Silicon Valley of agriculture" near Aarhus

September 15, 2016 by  
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According to William McDonough + Partners , the agricultural food park first opened in 2009. It is owned by The Danish Agriculture & Food Council and currently hosts 75 companies and 1,000 employees. Now spanning 44,000m2, the park will grow an additional 280,000m2 in multiple phases over the next 30 years. William McDonough + Partners said it is expected to “create synergies among the many existing tenants while building an ecosystem inviting new entities to further strengthen products and expertise developed within the hub.” McDonough later told Inhabitat, “This is a place, literally, where people could be engaging in the business of feeding the world safe, healthy food. That, to us, is very exciting.” William McDonough + Partners and GXN are specifically focusing on five particular areas that will define the AFP (and potentially future, similar developments) and creative an inspiring space that gives rise to innovation; they include healthy materials, clean energy , increased biodiversity, healthy air, and clean water. Related: Interview with William McDonough, green architect and Cradle to Cradle founder “Embracing Agro-Urban Ecosystem Design, the AFP treats urban and agricultural development together as a unified, productive and restorative ecosystem,” said William McDonough + Partners. “By integrating the carbon cycle and other ecological processes into large scale urban systems and their surroundings – buildings and energy flows, water cycles and wastewater treatment, land use and food production – the AFP creates economic value within the urban and agricultural infrastructure.” The master plan comprises three main sections – the Lawn, a central communal green space that will become a “showroom” for experimental food production, the Strip, the main street with “active” ground floor facades to ensure a lively atmosphere throughout the day, and five Plazas that “bind” clusters of buildings together, creating individual neighborhoods with distinct identities. “Innovation occurs best when knowledge is concentrated in clusters and cross-pollinated,” said Kasper Guldager Jensen, Director of GXN. “By linking food production to urban life, we have tried to create an environment where people, knowledge and ideas meet. The dream is to create the framework for agriculture’s answer to Silicon Valley.” + William McDonough + Partners

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Denmark is building the "Silicon Valley of agriculture" near Aarhus

Circular Infinite Bridge provides panoramic views in Aarhus, Denmark

February 6, 2016 by  
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New ‘Valdemars Have’ residential block will reinterpret old red brick townhouses in Denmark

January 18, 2016 by  
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Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects is always ahead of the curve when it comes to cutting-edge design. The Danish design studio recently won the competition to design a new residential development in Aarhus, Denmark’s second largest city. The ‘Valdemars Have’ urban residential block will reinterpret the concept of old red brick townhouses and create a unique public urban garden. This won’t be the studio’s first project in Aarhus-they recently completed Dokk1, Scandinavia’s largest library and the largest construction project ever built by the Municipality of Aarhus. Read the rest of New ‘Valdemars Have’ residential block will reinterpret old red brick townhouses in Denmark

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This is Scandinavia’s largest library and it’s powered by the sun

June 19, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of This is Scandinavia’s largest library and it’s powered by the sun Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: aarhus , aarhus river , Danish 2015 energy classification , Dokk1 , Dokk1 Aarhus , energy efficient library , library design , schmidt hammer lassen , Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects , Solar Power , Urban Mediaspace

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This is Scandinavia’s largest library and it’s powered by the sun

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