The Mountain tiny home comes with a skylit cedar shower

January 19, 2021 by  
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Designed and built by CoMak Tiny Homes in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, this tiny home on wheels packs a ton of cool features into a pretty small package. Apart from sustainable elements like a composting toilet and lightweight steel siding, The Mountain tiny home also boasts beautiful French doors, shiplap walls, a touchless kitchen sink faucet, and — our favorite feature — a bright, skylit cedar shower. Cody Makarevitz of CoMak Tiny Homes wanted to explore the idea of a tiny house that is cheaper and more mobile than standard tiny homes. “With the way the industry seems to be going, mansion tinys with not so tiny prices, I wanted to get back to the roots of the movement and make something a little more financially digestible for someone who doesn’t want to break the bank,” he told Inhabitat. “I also wanted to make a nice, high-quality product and livable at that size. This was the result.” Related: This tiny home on wheels features a cool laundry chute From the brick overlay under the kitchen island to the distressed barn wood beams on the ceiling, this home has plenty of thoughtful, stylish touches. The kitchen also has live edge walnut countertops, waterproof vinyl flooring and an on-demand hot water heater. Many of the materials used in the project were salvaged from other projects. On the other side of the tiny home, you’ll find a bathroom with Delta shower hardware, a Nature’s Head composting toilet (though it is also plumbed for standard toilet capabilities) and a cedar shower complete with 3-foot-by-3-foot skylight; you might just feel like you’re showering outside. Although The Mountain tiny home is built on a custom 13-foot-by-8-foot trailer frame, the shower bump and the front porch overhang bring the length to 18 feet. The downstairs square footage is just over 100 square feet with another 50 square feet in the loft. A 12-foot telescoping ladder leads to the loft , which has room for a king-sized bed and includes another tempered, double-pane skylight. + Tiny Estates Images via Cody Makarevitz

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Biden expected to cancel Keystone XL project on first day in office

January 19, 2021 by  
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Sources close to the U.S. President-elect Joe Biden indicate that he plans to cancel the permit for the Keystone XL pipeline project on his first day in office. Such reports have been causing unrest in Canada, with some leaders warning that if the project is canceled, there could be a diplomatic row between the two countries. According to a  report published  by Canadian Broadcasting Corp. (CBC), the words “Rescind Keystone XL pipeline permit” appear on Biden’s to-do list on his first day in office. The Keystone XL pipeline project was proposed to develop a pipeline that would move oil from Canada to Nebraska. But since the start, the project has been opposed by environmentalists, leading to several revisions. Opponents of the project say that the pipeline will be a major contributor to climate change and may show the country’s unwillingness to move away from an oil-based economy. Related: Federal judge blocks the Keystone XL Pipeline According to Canada’s ambassador to the U.S., Kirsten Hillman, the project would be beneficial to both the U.S. and Canada. Hillman said that she will continue to promote the project so long as it offers benefits for both countries. “There is no better partner for the U.S. on climate action than Canada as we work together for green transition,” Hillman said in a statement. According to Alberta Premier Jason Kennedy, canceling the project would kill jobs and weaken U.S. security, because the country would have to depend on OPEC oil imports. However, those opposed to the project have said that Alberta, the source of the oil , would be the biggest beneficiary in the project and that the pipeline would worsen climate change. In Canada, construction is underway, with the international border crossing already complete. The company in charge of the project, TC Energy Corp., has claimed that it will achieve net-zero emissions by 2023. However, critics do not subscribe to the narrative, given that the pipeline itself will be supplying oil. The project was approved in 2017 by the outgoing President Donald Trump . However, the pipeline had initially been rejected by the former U.S. President Barack Obama. Following its approval in 2017, various environmental groups moved to court, slowing the progress of the project in the U.S. Via Reuters and CBC Image via Chesapeake Climate

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A 1905 home reborn as greenery-filled office in Mexico City

December 24, 2020 by  
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Mexican architecture firm  Gabriel Beas Arquitectura  has transformed a 1905 building in the historic  Mexico City  neighborhood of Colonia San Rafael into Corporativo BNS, a contemporary office space surrounded by lush landscaping. Completed in phases over four years, the adaptive reuse project recovered much of the carved stonework, iron windows, carpentry and tiled floors original to the 1905 construction while introducing a new contemporary aesthetic that welcomes the outdoors in.  Oriented east to west on a long and linear site, the 1,095-square-meter Corporativo BNS consists of office spaces, meeting rooms, storage and other service spaces. In remodeling the structure, the architects learned that the building was converted into an  office  in the 1970s. After this, a series of added extensions covered up the original patios. To reconnect the new office with the outdoors, the architects restored the original patios and — taking advantage of the building’s walkable location in the city center — removed the sheltered parking areas. Those spaces were replaced with lushly planted  courtyards  that serve as waiting and meeting areas as well as the main circulation pathways through the various parts of the building. The open patio is also connected to the ground-floor kitchen and dining room for employees.  Related: Midcentury warehouse becomes a community-building asset in Mexico City The original structure has also been reinforced with two new steel-framed extensions sympathetic to the architectural design of the ground floor and fitted with partition walls and floor-to-ceiling glass. Vegetation introduced on the upper levels and along the parapets, roofs and terraces appears to immerse the  adaptive reuse  building in a jungle-like environment. “The result is a homogeneous group of buildings in which the different times of construction coexist with the vegetation, generating a space of calm between the chaos of the city,” the architects noted in a project statement.  + Gabriel Beas Arquitectura Photographrapy by Onnis Luque

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How to make vegetable broth with scraps to reduce food waste

May 22, 2020 by  
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Food waste is a major dilemma in today’s world, and throwing out even vegetable scraps contributes to the problem. Not to mention that throwing out unwanted food is also a huge waste of money. Here’s one small way to do your part —  make your own  vegetable (or meat) broths and stocks from scratch. It’s surprisingly easy to make broth and relies on bits and pieces of  veggies , meats and even odds and ends like cheese rinds, all of which would otherwise be thrown in the landfill. Plus, you’ll save money and create a much more flavorful broth than you can find at the store. Each time, the broth will taste slightly different, too, depending on the combination of scraps you have on hand. Get ready to make flavorful, comforting recipes with this tutorial on how to make your own broth to reduce  food waste . Related: Your guide to preserving, storing and canning food The first step is to find a large, freezer-safe container to store your scraps until you build up enough to produce a rich broth. Of course, much of the internet will say to throw it in a  plastic  resealable bag, but here at Inhabitat, we strongly encourage finding a glass jar or silicone resealable bag instead. The hardest part of the process is remembering to save those stems and peelings for the broth. If you are accustomed to tossing unwanted bits, like pepper stems or onion skins, straight into the garbage can or  compost bin , it will take a conscious effort to train your brain and hands to grab up those scraps and throw them into the freezer container. The freezer will preserve the scraps until you are ready to make a broth. Another good candidate for your scrap container? Veggies that are on their last leg at the end of the week. If you didn’t finish those carrots and celery, chop them into smaller pieces, and toss them in the freezer.  Wilting herbs , cheese rinds and meat bones are also fair game, depending on your dietary needs and what you have available. After a few weeks (or less depending on how many people are in your home!), you will be left with a full container packed with flavorful bits and pieces. It’s time to get cooking! Break out a stockpot and  start sauteing  those frozen vegetable scraps with oil and salt. Cook for just a few minutes before adding several cups of water (about 10 cups should do, but add more if you have more scraps and a larger stockpot). Then, simmer away! Simmer those scraps in water for 30 minutes to an hour; then be sure to let it cool slightly. Don’t forget to taste the broth — add more herbs, salt or even nutritional yeast if it needs a flavor boost. Next, remove the vegetable bits for composting. Strain the broth into another pot to make sure all of the scraps have been removed. Once the broth has completely cooled, pour it into airtight containers — glass jars work well — and store in the freezer for up to a month. Then, anytime you want to make an easy soup for dinner (we recommend these  vegan slow cooker soup  recipes) or even more complex, brothy meals, you can grab your own flavorful, zero-waste broth as the base. Images via Monika Schröder , Hebi. B , Rita E. and Snow Pea & Bok Choi

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How to make vegetable broth with scraps to reduce food waste

Intergravity launches sustainable clothing that reduces the need to do laundry

March 9, 2020 by  
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An exciting trend is hitting the fashion market, and it’s not about the coolest design or newest fad — it’s about corporate responsibility and sustainable practices. There are companies who believe fashion can be eco-friendly, ethical and affordable, and this Kickstarter campaign for sustainable, anti-bacterial clothing by Intergravity is the perfect example of this mindset. The company started out as a design and production house aimed at helping start-up designers build their collections. Along the way, it discovered a desire to make a clothing line that was long-lasting and eco-friendly, so the team evaluated every step in the operation and made every improvement they could think of. Related: Designer Dana Cohen creates unique, recycled fabric garments Intergravity begins its process by making its own fabric in-house. This way, it can control waste and production resources, such as water and electricity. All clothing is made from organic cotton, recycled polyester, Lenzing Ecovera and Tencel. Any leftover fabric will be donated to make cuff gloves for people who are at high-risk of being exposed to bacteria (e.g. street cleaners and janitors). All garments are produced by a small, family-run factory with a staff comprised of 80% women. Workers receive 15-20% of each garment’s price and are guaranteed a fair wage. To ensure the clothing meets the highest standards for eco-friendly practices, it is OEKO Tex 100 Standard, Bluesign and Global Organic Textile Standard certified. Intergravity’s focus is not only on conservation during production but also during the life of the garment. With this in mind, it coats products with Polygiene, an anti-bacterial and odor-control treatment. With the knowledge that cutting back on washing and drying clothing consumes less resources, Intergravity clothing can be worn longer between washings, saving time, money, water and electricity over the life of the garment. Each design factors in a wide size range to suit a variety of body types and includes an adjustable fit in shirts. Quality stitching, copious pockets and functional design round out the reasons to hold on to each garment for the long-haul rather than subscribing to fast fashion . To further its goal of protecting the Earth, Intergravity has joined 1% For the Planet as a way of giving back. At the time of writing, the campaign is nearly fully funded. If it achieves its goal, Intergravity is scheduling shipments for June 2020. + Intergravity Images via Intergravity

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Intergravity launches sustainable clothing that reduces the need to do laundry

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