Patagonias Black Hole Bags are made from recycled plastic bottles

December 2, 2019 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Patagonia is setting the bar for high-quality and sustainable products with its new line of bags made from recycled plastic bottles . Dubbed the Black Hole collection, the newest line offers 25 different bags, each with its own unique features and style. The Black Hole Bags are durable and stylish, and they come in a variety of styles and colors. Even better, the bags help reduce the amount of plastic that ends up in landfills every year. Patagonia’s 2019 line of these bags utilized 10 million plastic bottles, transforming all of this plastic into a unique recycled fabric that forms the webbing and body of the bags. Each bag is water-resistant and backed by the company’s Ironclad Guarantee, which entitles the buyer to a repair, replacement or refund should the product not perform to their full satisfaction. Related: New line of men’s swimwear is made from recycled ocean plastic The vintage-style Black Hole Duffel Bag holds 55 liters and can be either worn as a backpack or carried like a traditional duffel. It is made from 100 percent recycled polyester fabric with a recycled polyester lining and recycled nylon webbing made from 33 plastic water bottles. The 25-liter Black Hole Pack is made from the same tough materials as the duffel and features an air-mesh back panel to increase ventilation and comfort. The main inner pocket includes an internal padded sleeve designed to protect most laptops or hold a hydration reservoir. The accompanying mesh pocket comes with a key holder and an organizer to hold smaller items, such as a cell phone or wallet. The popular brand already prides itself on being environmentally and socially responsible and for good reason. Patagonia pledges at least 1 percent of its sales or 10 percent of pre-tax profits (whichever is higher) to grassroots environmental groups, helping to fund activists devoted to protecting natural habitats, wilderness and biodiversity. Patagonia also employs a Worn Wear program, where customers can mail in their used gear and clothing for store credit. Through this process, the company can find ways to reuse or recycle its products instead of trashing them. Fair, safe labor conditions and environmentally responsible practices are promoted by the company, and specific suppliers can be reviewed on the Patagonia website with full transparency . + Patagonia Images via Patagonia

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Patagonias Black Hole Bags are made from recycled plastic bottles

Students fight urban sprawl with a subdivision for two LEED Platinum houses

December 2, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

In an effort to fight urban sprawl and accommodate the growing population in Lawrence, Kansas, nonprofit Studio 804 has created a subdivision for two sustainable homes to show how urban density can be achieved in established neighborhoods. Designed and built by graduate students at the University of Kansas Department of Architecture, the Houses on Oak Hill Avenue are the most recent achievement of the comprehensive year-long design/build learning experience offered at Studio 804. As with every Studio 804 project since 2008, the recently completed buildings are certified LEED Platinum. To help Lawrence avoid outward sprawl, Studio 804 purchased and subdivided a lot for two small homes. Separated by a row of plantings and staggered for privacy, each of the light-filled homes features a gabled roof, a glazed south-facing end wall and vaulted ceilings to create a sense of spaciousness indoors. Both houses also feature similar floor plans, with the living areas on the southern street-facing side, long kitchens on the west side and private areas tucked behind. The larger of the two houses includes an additional flex room that could be used as an office space or second bedroom. Related: Students design and build a gorgeous LEED Platinum-seeking forum in Kansas “According to the city, we have seen medium to high population growth rates over the last two decades, and if this trend continues, we will need housing to accommodate a projected 30 to 60 thousand additional residents by the year 2040,” Studio 804 explained. “Increasing urban density in established neighborhoods provides a sustainable way to accommodate a growing population by utilizing existing resources and infrastructure.” The energy-efficient homes feature airtight and highly insulated envelopes topped with reflective metal roofs that reduce heat absorption. High-performance windows and doors prevent energy loss, while large walls of glass let plenty of natural light in to reduce reliance on artificial lighting. Including this project, Studio 804 has completed 13 LEED Platinum buildings to date. + Studio 804 Photography by Corey Gaffer Photography via Studio 804

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Students fight urban sprawl with a subdivision for two LEED Platinum houses

EPA’s New Fuel Economy Labels Open For Public Comment

August 30, 2010 by  
Filed under Eco, Eco Tech, Green

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The US Environmental Protection Agency has released its new vehicle fuel economy labels which are proposed to replace the current vehicle labels starting with the 2012 model year. The new labels provide consumers with additional information and a comparative ranking for new cars, with a comparison bar (not unlike what is now provided on appliances like refrigerators and clothes dryers) showing where the particular vehicle falls along the line from best to worst in fuel efficiency, greenhouse gasses, and other pollutants. Two alternative forms of labels (plus a third option which is not proposed for use at this time) are now open for public comment .

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EPA’s New Fuel Economy Labels Open For Public Comment

Does the Nissan LEAF Have an Achilles Heel?

August 30, 2010 by  
Filed under Eco, Eco Tech, Green

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Starting tomorrow, you can officially order a Nissan LEAF , and I don’t think it’s a surprise to anyone that we’ve been pretty excited about this vehicle.  It will be the first mass-produced all-electric car on the market and, with federal and state incentives included, it will also be affordable.  But I’m getting a bit nervous as well. As we’ve mentioned before , this crowning of the LEAF as the inaugural mass market electric vehicle is both a blessing and a curse for Nissan and those of us who strongly support electric cars.  The LEAF will enjoy a bit of fame, but a lot of pressure rests on its wheels to prove that electric cars can easily take the place of their gas-fueled counterparts.  And there’s one particular feature that may hold it back.

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Does the Nissan LEAF Have an Achilles Heel?

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