3D-printed Playmobil hair helmet makes bike safety more fun for kids

October 10, 2016 by  
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Someone has come up with a brilliant idea to turn a Playmobil hairpiece into a helmet so kids will start wearing them. A duo of Swedish and Danish designers created a compelling prototype through 3D printing and color-matching the hair. With the right amount of consumer demand, you could find one in stores soon. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=91&v=QapmUU2d44U An estimated 75 percent of bicycle-related fatalities in child populations can be avoided with the use of a helmet , but statistics won’t get kids to wear them. Enter Simon Higby and Clara Prior from the Stockholm and Copenhagen offices of DDB , respectively. To increase the odds of children protecting their noggins while riding bikes , they figured the helmets would have be more attractive to them. Cue the Playmobil hair replica designed to help keep kids safe. Related: Lumos helmet keeps bikers safe with turn signals and brake lights With the help of Danish design company MOEF , the team created the helmet by 3D scanning the tiny plastic piece and 3D printing a sturdy helmet. The final product looks just like the Playmobil piece, perfectly fitted for a tiny human’s head. Sadly, only the prototype exists, but the team told Metro.co.uk they “would love to” produce them for the masses with the right know-how. +MOEF , Simon Higby Via  Metro.co.uk Images via YouTube (screenshot)

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3D-printed Playmobil hair helmet makes bike safety more fun for kids

Paris allows anyone to plant an urban garden

October 10, 2016 by  
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Paris just passed a new law that allows anyone to plant an urban garden within the city’s limits. Upon receiving a permit, gardeners can grow plants on walls, in boxes, on rooftops, under trees, or on fences. They can cultivate greenery in front of their homes or offices. They can grow flowers, vegetables, and fruit. Paris mayor Anne Hidalgo’s goal is to create 100 hectares of living walls and green roofs by the year 2020, with one third of that greenery dedicated to agriculture . Locals are encouraged to be ” gardeners of the Parisian public space ” under the new law. Gardeners must use sustainable methods, avoiding pesticides and promoting biodiversity in the city. They are asked to sign a “Charter of revegetation” and grow “local honey plants,” and they will need to maintain their urban gardens and ensure the greenery enhances the city’s aesthetic. The City of Paris will issue the three-year permits, with the option to renew them. Related: Plant-covered Mobile Green Living Room travels through Europe The city asked residents to get creative with where they grow plants, and it will contribute a “planting kit” with seeds and topsoil. They say they’ve offered a few suggestions, but mainly hope people will use their imagination for where they might be able to green the city. Paris city officials hope the law will improve the quality of life for city dwellers and boost the beauty of the city. Assistant to the Mayor of Paris Penelope Komitès also said cultivating the gardens could help locals strengthen relationships with their neighbors and “create social links.” Via La Relève et La Peste Images via snoeziesterre on Flickr and Wikimedia Commons

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Paris allows anyone to plant an urban garden

Australian desert farm grows 17,000 metric tons of vegetables with just seawater and sun

October 10, 2016 by  
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This incredible farm makes tomato plants bloom in the desert using nothing more than sunlight and seawater . Needing no soil, fossil fuels, groundwater, or pesticides, Sundrop Farms grows crops in a hydroponic greenhouse lined with water-drenched cardboard. The 20-hectare farm officially opened on October 6th near Port Augusta, and their desert-grown tomatoes are already for sale in Australian grocery stores Sundrop Farms works agricultural magic. Conventional farming won’t work in the desert region, but that doesn’t matter for this desert farm. It obtains water from the Spencer Gulf, and desalinizes the water using renewable energy. 23,000 mirrors reflect light to a receiver tower to generate solar power . When the sun is shining, the system can provide 39 megawatts of clean energy – that’s enough to keep the desalination plant working and power the greenhouse, which is heated during the winter. Related: Sahara Desert Project to grow 10 hectares of food in Tunisian desert The facility can grow 17,000 metric tons of produce each year. 18,000 tomato plants grow in the greenhouse, and Sundrop Farms aims to grow other crops like fruit and peppers. Plants are grown in coconut husks, and the farm employs ” predatory insects ” to control pests that could harm plants. The farming system cost $200 million to build – but Sundrop Farms CEO Philipp Saumweber says the hefty price tag will pay off over time because the farm won’t need to purchase any fossil fuels. The farm can hook up to the grid if there are winter solar power shortages, however its ultimate goal is to progress to the point where it’s completely self-sufficient. According to Sundrop Farms , “we are breaking farming’s dependence on finite resources.” This year they broke ground on a farm in Tennessee, and they recently finished their first European farm in Portugal. + Sundrop Farms Via New Scientist Images via Sundrop Farms Facebook

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Australian desert farm grows 17,000 metric tons of vegetables with just seawater and sun

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