Labo Mono turns plastic water bottles into Urban Jackets for cycling and everyday use

June 19, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

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The process started with a miserable bike ride in the rain and ended with a new company, Labo Mono, and development of its first product: the Urban Jacket. London-based designer Ali Namdari sought out a fashionable and useful jacket after being caught in a rainstorm while biking home. With no luck finding this combination, he decided to make his own. The idea for bold prints on a jacket that can be worn socially as well as functionally repel rain has hit home with followers on the Kickstarter campaign, which has raised more than twice the original goal. It’s not just the colorful, stand-out look that has appealed to backers, but also the goal to produce the Urban Jacket with ethical manufacturing practices and sustainable materials . Related: Everlane introduces long-lasting outerwear made from recycled water bottles With this in mind, Labo Mono incorporates over 30 recycled plastic bottles into each jacket. The company notes that this not only provides a second life for water bottle waste, but also significantly reduces water, energy and carbon dioxide emissions during production. Labo Mono also set out to find an alternative to the traditional waterproofing material known as PFC (perfluorinated chemicals) that endangers water, humans and wildlife . The goal was to offer a trendy option coupled with functional design, so the Urban Jacket features high waterproof protection, discreet armpit zippers, roomy pockets, a hood created to allow room for a helmet, a long back to protect against road spray, reflective components and breathable fabric. “We definitely don’t aim to blend in. Colors, prints and usability are frontiers that we are always exploring,” Namdari said. “We’re on a mission to create pieces of clothing that aren’t just fun and pleasant to look at, but also cleverly functional and versatile. All that while using the most sustainable materials possible.” In seeking out partners for manufacturing, the company placed an emphasis on finding companies that share its philosophy of ethical practices. Labo Mono found what it was looking for in a production facility in China that specializes in outerwear and a German manufacturer that creates the PFC-free, water-repellent finish that will be applied to the fabric of the Urban Jacket. Looking ahead to future products, Labo Mono selected a company in Portugal for manufacturing tees and pants made from recycled materials . The Kickstarter campaign ends on June 20, 2019. + Labo Mono Images via Labo Mono

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Labo Mono turns plastic water bottles into Urban Jackets for cycling and everyday use

TREDJE NATUR develops sidewalk tiles to capture and reuse water runoff

June 19, 2019 by  
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As the saying goes, when it rains, it pours. And when it pours, streets flood. This causes problems with the infrastructure as well as foot and road traffic. Plus, flash floods wreak havoc on storm drain systems. One company has found a solution in the form of sidewalk tiles that absorb the excess water and funnel it to nearby foliage. This process not only diverts water from the walkways and streets but puts that water to use without the need for it to first travel through the wastewater treatment system and overwhelm sewers. Climate Tile is a product of Danish start-up company TREDJE NATUR , catching the attention of municipal decision-makers internationally. Copenhagen just installed the first 165-foot strip of Climate Tiles in an effort to reclaim water and also save the city money. Other cities have shown an interest in the new technology as well. Related: TREDJE NATUR proposes angled timber housing that meets UN’s sustainability goals The tiles work by creating a permeable surface, similar to the earth’s crust. Small holes in the tiles allow water to flow underground, diverting into man-made aquifers. The water can remain in storage for later use or be directed into nearby grass, plants and other landscaping . While the initial trial is encouraging, developers are watching and waiting to see the long-term performance of the tiles now that they are installed. With a real-life example to study, researchers are monitoring the tiles for how they manage different weather types throughout the seasons, weight loads, salting, wear, staining and more. The pilot project in Copenhagen has set the stage for what is possible with the Climate Tiles, but now the company is focused on finding a way to distribute the product to mass markets around the globe. With millions of miles of sidewalks across the planet, TREDJE NATUR is hoping to encourage other municipalities to incorporate Climate Tiles into urban planning . This is most effectively done during scheduled pipe and plumbing updates to minimize additional roadwork. Although the tiles offer cost savings in both water consumption and flood damage repair , the overarching goal of the company is to produce a long-term, sustainable solution for ongoing climate adaptations, so the tiles are given an estimated 50-year lifespan. + TREDJE NATUR Via Architectural Digest Images via TREDJE NATUR

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TREDJE NATUR develops sidewalk tiles to capture and reuse water runoff

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