Green-roofed Stonecrop home rises from rural English landscape

March 6, 2020 by  
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London-based architecture firm  Featherstone Young  recently completed Stonecrop, a new home in Rutland, East Midlands that’s also an example of how thoughtful architecture can draw new interest to declining rural communities. Topped with a sloping green roof that touches the ground, the sculptural building features two wings — one that houses the main living areas and the other for guest quarters — that wrap around a central courtyard. To reduce the home’s environmental footprint , the architects used locally sourced Clipsham limestone and oriented the home according to passive solar principles.  When the architects were asked by their clients to design a home on the edge of a village designated as a conservation area, they were initially met with pushback from the local planning authority. In response, the firm created a successful two-stage planning approach that not only detailed designs for a 347-square-meter sustainable home, but also showed how sensitive new construction could protect and enhance the surrounding countryside by preventing linear sprawl.  “Releasing overlooked sites such as these helps keep villages compact and distinct, and kicks against the usual housing development we see sprawling into the countryside,” explained Sarah Featherstone, architect and co-director of Featherstone Young. “This, coupled with the house’s two-wing strategy, makes for a more sustainable approach to building in  rural settings .” Related: Contemporary barn-inspired home adheres to passive house principles Stonecrop’s two-wing design also helps clients save on energy costs. When the secondary wing for guests is not in use, the clients can choose to only heat the main wing for day-to-day living. The principal wing is defined by its “buffer” wall of textured dry stone that provides privacy and thermal mass. In contrast, the three-bedroom guest wing, which is also constructed from the same locally sourced Clipsham  limestone , features a smooth ashlar finish. The two wings wrap around a central courtyard that helps funnel natural light and ventilation indoors. Large glazed walls frame views of the garden and meadow, while a natural material palette further ties the interiors to the outdoors.  + Featherstone Young Images © Brotherton-Lock and © James Brittain

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Green-roofed Stonecrop home rises from rural English landscape

Reima designs a traceable, recyclable jacket for kids

March 6, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

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Finnish children’s activewear brand Reima has released its 100% recyclable children’s jacket. The stylish and sustainable outerwear is crafted from recycled polyester and comes with a tracking code for users to follow the product’s journey throughout its recycling and reuse. Even better, when you register to track the jacket, Reima will donate to organizations that help clean toxic blue-green algae from the Baltic Sea. The brand, founded in Finland in 1944, is tailored toward giving children the wearable tools they need to enjoy the great outdoors safely and sustainably. The Voyager joins Reima’s eco-minded collection featuring non-toxic, waterproof finishes and sustainable materials such as recycled polyester from plastic bottles, bamboo viscose and organic cotton . Each jacket comes with a traceable ID, and for each ID that is registered, Reima donates $11 to the Finland’s John Nurminen Foundation. Related: P+365 is turning abandoned festival tents into wearable merchandise “Another child reusing the Voyager jacket will save as much CO2 as it would take to produce a new garment,” said Shahriare Mahmood, R&D and sustainability director at Reima. “The high-quality and classic design of the Voyager jacket ensures it has enough value to be resold and reused by several children. We want to make an ecosystem with a true circular approach and provide the opportunity for our customers to act responsibly. We know that polyester recycling is possible, and by creating a proper ecosystem, we are heading to add even more value through upcycling .” Every part of the Voyager jacket — besides the zipper lock and snaps (which can be recycled as metal) — is made from polyester, a material that can be recycled into polymers to reuse for different products. The jacket’s material dries quickly and can be washed at lower temperatures with less detergent, features that contribute to saving energy and water while using less chemicals. Reima is also introducing a summer collection using SunProof Repreve recycled polyester jersey fabric made from plastic water bottles. The Reima SunProof PES jersey will provide UV 50+ sun protection. + Reima Images via Reima

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Reima designs a traceable, recyclable jacket for kids

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