Are these zero-carbon domes the future of sustainable housing?

March 20, 2020 by  
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When design and architecture start-up Geoship met its $100,000 equity crowdfunding goal in just five days in January 2020, founder and CEO Morgan Bierschenk knew the fledgling company had something special on its hands. The product? Sustainable, affordable housing in the form of unique geodesic domes that are also zero-carbon. Geoship built its first prototype dome in 2015, and in 2019, it partnered with Zappos in an effort to address the homelessness crisis in downtown Las Vegas, where the company is headquartered. The partnership has since created a scalable model of villages specifically aimed at helping to eliminate homelessness in the United States by 2030. Related: Create your own backyard geodesic dome with these super affordable DIY kits So what makes these domes so special? A 100% bioceramic material combined with basalt and hemp fiber (similar to bone and shells) is used to construct the framing, insulation and panels to provide an environmentally friendly alternative to traditional building materials. This ceramic composite is designed to withstand extreme temperatures, making it fireproof up to 2,300 degrees Fahrenheit. The dome shape distributes pressure evenly throughout the structure, a feature that makes it both earthquake- and hurricane-proof, according to Geoship. Additionally, the material doesn’t attract mold or insects and won’t rust, rot or deteriorate. The minerals used to create the bioceramic can be harvested from sustainable, natural resources, such as seawater desalination plants and non-toxic sewage treatment plants. Old material can either be turned into new panels or used as fertilizer. Currently, estimated turnkey prices for the domes range from $45,000 to $230,000, depending on the size. The price includes everything from delivery, permitting, installation, mechanical systems, interior finishing, appliances and materials for passive solar heating and cooling. Geoship is unique in that it is structured as a “Social Purpose Corporation,” a multi-stakeholder cooperative where customers will be major owners in the company in addition to the investors and employees, a model that Bierschenk believes consumers were all too ready for. “Old school capitalism makes rich people richer, and everybody defers responsibility, while our planet pays the price,” Bierschenk said. “We’re shifting that paradigm by making our seed investment widely accessible, and distributing equity to customers and the Earth.” + Geoship Images via Geoship

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Are these zero-carbon domes the future of sustainable housing?

Ibiza home uses passive, bioclimatic systems to reduce energy use

March 20, 2020 by  
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Spain’s idyllic Balearic Islands are an inspiration for artists and architects alike. One Formentera-based architect Marià Castelló has just used Ibiza’s spectacular beauty to craft a modern home. Tucked into the island’s hilly San Mateo region in the north, Ca l’Amo is a serene retreat comprised of five cube-like volumes that use several passive, bioclimatic elements to reduce the project’s environmental footprint. The San Mateo plains were once filled with terraced landscapes used for agriculture , but over the years, the area has regrown its native pine and juniper forests. Using this natural landscape as inspiration, Marià Castelló designed Ca l’Amo, a contemporary home shaded by natural vegetation . Built upon two existing dry stone walls, the home’s white cladding and natural limestone terraces give it an undeniably Mediterranean feel. Related: Architects revamp a 100-year-old warehouse into a dreamy off-grid refuge in Ibiza The five rectangular volumes are spaced to provide openings between each, creating a harmonious connection between the indoors and outdoors. The dwelling features a swimming pool and covered lounge area on one end, where residents can make the most of the Mediterranean climate. This first volume is then connected linearly to the following four volumes, which contain the shared and private living spaces. The interior spaces reflect the same openness of the exterior. With walls of sliding glass doors, each volume can be opened up to the elements. A minimalist interior includes white walls and cross-laminated timber accents. Outfitted with sparse pieces of custom-designed furniture, the living spaces put all of the focus on the natural setting. Further putting nature at the forefront of the design, the residence was designed to reduce energy usage through the implementation of several passive and bioclimatic design elements. The separate volumes and open spaces were designed to take full advantage of natural light and air ventilation, while the home was strategically positioned to use the vegetation and sun path to keep the interior spaces cool and comfortable year-round. Additionally, a rainwater collection system includes a cistern that can store up to 200 metric tons of water for reuse. +  Marià Castelló Architecture Via Wallpaper* Images via Marià Castelló

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Ibiza home uses passive, bioclimatic systems to reduce energy use

A gorgeous houseboat with a shockingly spacious interior can be yours for $375K

November 7, 2018 by  
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Tiny home builders are always popping up with new and ingenious ways to make a small space seem larger, and this gorgeous houseboat is no exception. The amazing interior design will make you forget all about the home’s 510-square-footage. Located on Seattle’s ship canal just minutes from downtown, the charming cottage on the water comes with plenty of unique features, including a Japanese-style, cedar soaking tub, a custom-made elevator bed and an open-air rooftop lounge. The beautiful houseboat, which is currently listed for $375,000 , is clad in a serene blue hue that pays homage to its aquatic environment. Inside, the design is simply jaw-dropping. Light wood panels on the ceiling complement the calming white walls, while large windows naturally brighten the entire space. Throughout the home, unique cork flooring leads from the living room to the kitchen to the two bedrooms, seamlessly connecting the spaces. Related: This whimsical houseboat in Seattle is straight out of a fairytale The interior, which has recently been renovated, uses a number of space-saving techniques  and fabulous furnishings to open up the tiny home. The living room is a welcoming area with a long comfy couch meant for socializing. The sofa and most of the furnishings were kept in neutral shades to keep the atmosphere peaceful. Strategic pops of color here and there add a modern vibrancy to the design. In this home, every room has a strong personality. The kitchen was renovated with rustic, live-edge counters and backsplash. Salvaged slate cabinets were installed to lend an industrial touch to the design. The spa-like bathroom boasts a soothing pebble floor and an aromatic, cedar soaking tub. The two bedrooms also hide a few fun secrets, such as the vertical lift bed that converts one of the bedrooms into an office space or playroom when raised. Throughout the home, ample storage in the walls and stairs helps to avoid clutter. Of course, the heart of the home is found on the upper level lounge with a small sitting area, which leads to an open-air rooftop balcony . This space is perfect for entertaining, al fresco dining or just enjoying the serene water views. + Metropolist Via Apartment Therapy Photography by Diwas Photography via Metropolist

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A gorgeous houseboat with a shockingly spacious interior can be yours for $375K

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