Elon Musk’s first tunnel is almost complete and he’s offering free rides

May 11, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Another day, another genius marketing idea from Elon Musk . In an Instagram post , Musk announced that he plans to offer free rides in The Boring Company’s first tunnel — which he described as “almost done.” Musk went on to say: “As mentioned in prior posts, once fully operational (demo system rides will be free), the system will always give priority to pods for pedestrians and cyclists for less than the cost of a bus ticket.” First Boring Company tunnel under LA almost done! Pending final regulatory approvals, we will be offering free rides to the public in a few months. Super huge thanks to everyone that helped with this project. Strong support from public, elected officials & regulators is critical to success. As mentioned in prior posts, once fully operational (demo system rides will be free), the system will always give priority to pods for pedestrians & cyclists for less than the cost of a bus ticket. A post shared by Elon Musk (@elonmusk) on May 10, 2018 at 6:49pm PDT The Boring Company will offer rides in the tunnel under the Los Angeles , California area “pending final regulatory approvals” in a few months. Elon Musk thanked people who have been involved in the project, and said “Strong support from public, elected officials and regulators is critical to success.” As he often does, Musk answered a few questions about the project on Twitter. He said the company has already started working on a route between New York and Washington, D.C., and that they hope to start work on a route between Los Angeles and San Francisco in 2019. Musk explained that one would be a true Hyperloop with “pressurized pods in near vacuum tunnels,” and that passengers on that route would be able to travel faster than if they were on a jetliner. Related: Boring Company confirms plans to use excavated dirt for low-cost housing bricks When one Twitter user requested a stop near Vandenburg, an Air Force base in Santa Barbara County from which SpaceX launches rockets, Musk responded , “A cool thing about the design is that’s easy to incorporate branch loops to serve small to mid-size cities without slowing down the main loop at all.” The Boring Company’s frequently asked questions page says the initial test tunnel is in Hawthorne, California. According to the Los Angeles Times , in April the City Council’s public works committee unanimously approved an environmental review exemption for a 2.7-mile tunnel. The Boring Company Images via The Boring Company

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Elon Musk’s first tunnel is almost complete and he’s offering free rides

Tourists in Utah are tossing priceless dinosaur footprints into a lake

May 11, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

People, this is why we can’t have nice things. Tourists in Utah have been removing dinosaur footprints embedded in sandstone and tossing them into the lake at Red Fleet State Park in Vernal. The foot-long prehistoric dino tracks primarily come from the reptile known as the velociraptor in Jurassic Park (it’s actually a Deinonychus ), and park officials are frantically trying to stop visitors from destroying the priceless artifacts. Park officials don’t know why people have started tossing the prints into the lake. Certainly, some people don’t realize what they are doing, despite signs around the site warning visitors not to disturb the sandstone. “It’s become quite a big problem,” Utah Division of State Parks spokesman Devan Chavez told the Salt Lake Tribune . “They’re just looking to throw rocks off the side. What they don’t realize is these rocks they’re picking up, they’re covered in dinosaur tracks.” Related: Video captures vandals toppling 18-million-year-old sandstone formation in Oregon For now, the park is putting up more signs to stop the vandalism, but they are also considering sending a diving team into the water to recover the prints. Unfortunately, many of them shatter when they hit the water, and many others have probably dissolved. “Some of them are likely lost forever,” Chavez said. Tourists have vandalized national and state park sites multiple times in the past few years, including an instance in 2001 where three Boy Scouts tore up a dinosaur print trail at the same park. In 2013, Boy Scout leaders tipped over “goblin” formations in Goblin Valley State Park, and even celebrities have gotten in on the vandalism . Unfortunately, due to the Trump administration’s budget cuts, the parks system is struggling to address the ongoing problem across the country. Via History and the Salt Lake Tribune Image via Jim McKenzie

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Tourists in Utah are tossing priceless dinosaur footprints into a lake

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