The many ways fungi are saving our planet

April 10, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on The many ways fungi are saving our planet

Fungi are living organisms that support the ecosystem of the entire planet. Most people associate mushrooms with fungi, but in reality, mushrooms merely make up the ‘flower’ portion of some species of fungi. Up to 90% of the fungi associated with the mushroom is underground as part of a web called mycelium . Scientists are continually discovering ways fungi enhance the circle of life. The mushroom and mycelium components of fungi are currently a hot topic in the research world, because there are already over 100,000 identified varieties with thousands more being discovered annually. Together, these fungi species are unlocking solutions for cleaning up the environment, developing greener construction and product materials and contributing significant medicinal benefits. What are fungi? Fungi are basically the digestive tract of the planet. As a carbon-based substance, fungi work in conjunction with all living or decaying things. Whether that is a tree that has fallen in the woods or an animal that dies along the side of the road, mycelium works below-ground to facilitate decomposition. Mycelium is a massive filter that removes toxins from the soil , improving water quality as a result. Related: How fungi made Earth’s atmosphere livable This network also cycles nutrients from one location to another, essentially transporting food and water from one plant to another. It’s also believed they send messages throughout the forest that support the success of other fungi as well as overall plant life. In scientific papers reviewed as recently as two months ago, evidence has come to light indicating fungal fossils may date back at least 715 to 810 million years and possibly even over one billion years ago. Whether that can be proven or not, most scientists accept that fungi have survived on the planet since at least 400 million years ago. Further, researchers give credit to fungi for their critical role in facilitating the continued existence of the planet. Fungi and climate change In addition to supporting the entire plant kingdom, fungi are recognized as a promising weapon in the fight against climate change . While some of these discoveries happen in a lab, others are happening in nature as we go about our daily lives. As outlined in a new documentary, Fantastic Fungi , fungi are indiscriminate in their consumption of organic material. As an example of this cycle, fungi can break down carbon-based diesel oil, growing mushrooms in its wake. Then birds, bees and bugs feed, spread seeds and pollinate as a result, supporting more than just the surrounding area. In fact, many scientists believe mushrooms might be one solution to ending the crisis bees are facing, because mushrooms’ antiviral characteristics may offer protection from damaging chemicals in other plants. Fungi can likely clean up other aspects of the environment, too. According to the State of the World’s Fungi 2018 report , the mushroom Aspergillus tubingensis has the ability to grow directly on the surface of plastic and has properties that actually deteriorate the material. Yes, apparently some mushrooms can eat plastic . Even more amazing is the discovery that fungi were found consuming radiation off the walls of the abandoned Chernobyl plant. In fact, three species were found to be absorbing the radiation and turning it into energy for growth. In essence, they were feeding off radiation. Mushroom waste becomes biofuel Natural waste from mushroom production can also be converted into biofuel . According to research published in Science Advances , the research team revealed that a naturally occurring bacterium called Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum (TG57), isolated from waste generated after harvesting mushrooms, is capable of directly converting cellulose (a plant-based material) to biobutanol, leading to a much cleaner way to produce biofuel and reduce emissions from fossil fuels. Products made from fungi Product manufacturers are also looking toward fungi in material development due to properties that allow them to naturally decompose at the end of their life cycle. Fungi are being used as a substitute for environmental nemesis polystyrene foam , animal leather and chemical-laden building materials. One company, Coeio, has even created a mushroom-infused burial suit, explaining that a human body will break down faster and give back to the Earth sooner while the fungal properties filter out any toxic chemicals the body has acquired while living. Fungi for health Fungi are also in the spotlight for exciting medical advancements, such as treating anxiety and depression with psilocybin . Fungi could also help fight against cognitive decline, according to a recent study . Plus, fungi are already part of our everyday life in ways you may not even recognize. In addition to the mushrooms on your pizza , fungi are important for fermentation, which creates alcohol, leavened bread and much more. The list of possible ways fungi are saving our planet is nearly as long as the list of species themselves. With an increasing interest in research, the possibilities for finding innovative ways to use fungi in the future are exciting and promising. Images via Pixabay

See the rest here: 
The many ways fungi are saving our planet

Spiders are becoming aggressive thanks to climate change

August 22, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Spiders are becoming aggressive thanks to climate change

Can climate change influence a spider’s aggressive behavior? According to a recent study, yes! A team of researchers from Canada and the U.S., who were led by Alexander Little at the University of California, Santa Barbara, concluded that colonies of communal spiders ( Anelosimus studiosus ), who typically reside over rivers or streams, can be impacted by climate change and hurricanes in what they call a “cyclone-induced disturbance.” Related: The ‘tipping point’ has arrived as temperatures rise in 70 US counties The research group conducted its study in North America’s Atlantic coast and observed 211 spider sites before and after a hurricane struck. This was accomplished by traveling to the areas at various times, before and after a hurricane, and measuring the spiders aggression to web vibration caused with an electric toothbrush and piece of paper. Little and his colleagues study is “a remarkable example that addresses this knowledge gap; by studying the impacts of tropical cyclones with spatiotemporal replications and control sites, they show that selectivity for more aggressive colonies of Anelosimus studiosus  is a robust evolutionary response to cyclone-induced disturbance,” wrote Eric Ameca, a researcher at Beijing Normal University, in a Nature commentary . While aggression ranges in communal spiders, the group’s overall observations revealed that after a hurricane, the more aggressive colonies produced extra egg sacs and had more babies survive. Researchers also believe that spiders might become more aggressive due to less food availability after a cyclone or if a storm killed a mother spider. If so, it  forced the babies to survive on their own. In addition to this study, others have surmised that some weather patterns can be attached to animal behavior, however, those have centered on observations solely after an extreme weather event. Ameca said this study showed the importance into how some species like the Anelosimus studiosus can conform and survive in extreme weather. Via Gizmodo Image via Flickr

Read more:
Spiders are becoming aggressive thanks to climate change

Why Is Denver So Bad at Recycling?

December 16, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Why Is Denver So Bad at Recycling?

Denver is one of those cities that seems like it would be a dream for any eco-friendly person to live in. It’s full of like-minded people all working together to keep the environment clean and healthy … right? According to a recent study,…

The rest is here:
Why Is Denver So Bad at Recycling?

American’s have too much stuff and it is bad for our mental health

September 3, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on American’s have too much stuff and it is bad for our mental health

These days, most of us have so much stuff that it is actually making us ill. In a recent study that confirms what many of us already knew, many Americans admit to having way too much crap , while at the same time, a huge number of people are struggling to pay their bills. It’s all combining to make for some miserable, unhealthy people.

Excerpt from: 
American’s have too much stuff and it is bad for our mental health

Greenpeace identifies brands that are still polluting oceans with microbeads

July 24, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Greenpeace identifies brands that are still polluting oceans with microbeads

Microbeads are wrecking havoc on our oceans. Commonly used as an exfoliant in facial scrubs and shower gel, these tiny pieces of plastic get washed down the drain and often end up in the bellies of fish and other marine life. Despite widespread outcry against the use of microbeads, many brands that allegedly pledged to uphold a microbead ban have fallen disappointedly short, Greenpeace reports in a recent study. Click through to learn which brands are still polluting oceans with the tiny pieces of plastic.

Read more here:
Greenpeace identifies brands that are still polluting oceans with microbeads

Millennials are more likely to donate their unwanted clothes than older adults

March 19, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Millennials are more likely to donate their unwanted clothes than older adults

Millennials are less likely than older adults to throw out old clothes and other unwanted textiles , according to a recent study. Basically, those aged between 18 and 34 were more apt to donate unused goods to secondhand stores like Goodwill and the Salvation Army. READ MORE >

Go here to see the original: 
Millennials are more likely to donate their unwanted clothes than older adults

Infographic: The Real Emissions of Your Electric Car Will Depend on Where You Live

June 10, 2013 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Infographic: The Real Emissions of Your Electric Car Will Depend on Where You Live

We’re not exactly sure why, but people love a good myth about clean-tech— e.g. making solar panels uses more energy than they generate, or wind farms actually increase emissions. The most fashionable of late is that producing and charging electric vehicles means heavy carbon emissions . So is it true? In a recent study comparing grid-powered electric car emissions around the world,   Shrink That Footprint  found that electric cars using coal-fired electricity have carbon emissions similar to average gasoline cars. However, when charged with low carbon power, they have just a quarter of the emissions of a typical car, or about half those of the best hybrid. Even when you account for a car’s manufacturing footprint, it turns out that what really matters is the electricity source and where you live can have a big impact. Find out more on the subject over at Shrink That Footprint . The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “clean energy” , car emissions , clean air , electric car emissions , gas emissions , green air , green transportation , hybrid car emissions , reducing emissions , vehicle emissions        

Read the original post: 
Infographic: The Real Emissions of Your Electric Car Will Depend on Where You Live

Scientists See a Negative Outlook Despite a Recent Stabilization in Global Warming

May 21, 2013 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Scientists See a Negative Outlook Despite a Recent Stabilization in Global Warming

When it comes to global warming, things may not be quite as bad as we thought. According to a recent study in Nature Geoscience , global warming seems to have leveled off over the past decade, meaning that some of the most dire climate change predictions could be a thing of the past. But while the news is good, it doesn’t mean that we are out of the danger zone. Global warming is still changing life on the planet as we know it. Read the rest of Scientists See a Negative Outlook Despite a Recent Stabilization in Global Warming Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: carbon atmospheric levels , carbon dioxide levels , climate change news , climate change study , CO2 levels , global warming , global warming leveling off , global warming levels , global warming stabilizing , global warming tapering off , global warming temperatures , oceans absorbing heat , understanding climate change        

Original post: 
Scientists See a Negative Outlook Despite a Recent Stabilization in Global Warming

Study Says That Home Wifi Could Be Used By Emergency Response Teams When Mobile Phones are Down

August 22, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Study Says That Home Wifi Could Be Used By Emergency Response Teams When Mobile Phones are Down

Photo:  Fire department response via Shutterstock Responding to an emergency is a challenge without the added hurdle of doing it without mobile technology , but that is often the reality for response teams in emergency situations. Thanks to a recent study released in Germany, scientists found that home wireless routers could be used to link up emergency responders in the event of catastrophe or other urgent situation. Read the rest of Study Says That Home Wifi Could Be Used By Emergency Response Teams When Mobile Phones are Down Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: cell phone use , disaster preparedness , emergency communication , emergency planning , emergency responders , internet routers , mobile technology , public wifi , Technical University at Darmstadt , Wifi routers , wifi technology

View original post here:
Study Says That Home Wifi Could Be Used By Emergency Response Teams When Mobile Phones are Down

Birds Caught in Fishing Lines Dying by the Thousands

September 27, 2011 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Birds Caught in Fishing Lines Dying by the Thousands

Photo: versageek / cc While it’s no secret that keeping up with the world’s demand for seafood puts terrible strain on ocean ecosystems, it turns out that fish aren’t the only species feeling the pinch from overfishing. On the heels of a recent study which found that fishing nets and hooks in the U.S. kill around 4,600 sea turtles every year off the U.S. coast alone, a

View original here: 
Birds Caught in Fishing Lines Dying by the Thousands

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 9530 access attempts in the last 7 days.