Don’t forget to fight for these "less glamorous" endangered species

February 20, 2019 by  
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Not all endangered animals have their own PR firms to save them. Many are living humble lives outside the limelight. A new poster campaign, commissioned by NetCredit, aims to draw attention to these underdogs in the conservation movement. According to Luke Doyle, who worked on the campaign, “The research team gathered data from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to build a long list of species that are flagged as ‘endangered’ or ‘threatened’ in every state of the U.S. The team then shortlisted the top populations at risk of extinction in each state, making sure that there were no duplicated species , as in some cases, certain states are home to the same populations. When finding a species that had been shortlisted already but was repeated in two or more states, we moved forward with the next domestic species on the list for the state we were working on.” Related: These are the most endangered species in the world Here’s an assortment of these endangered and threatened animals from different regions of the US. See the full list of endangered animals in every state here . Arkansas: ivory-billed woodpecker Logging decimated the home of the ivory-billed woodpecker, which was first reported extinct in 1944. However, occasional reported sightings give hope that a small population still lives on. California: Point Arena mountain beaver This primitive rodent is called a “living fossil.” They live underground, surfacing to eat stinging nestles and thistles. Agriculture , roads and recreational use of land threaten what’s left of their habitat. Illinois: cave amphipod An Illinois original, this gray amphipod lives in cold water, shunning light. Extremely sensitive, this little crustacean is very susceptible to pesticides and other human-made chemicals. Scientists are working to restore the population by 2023. Indiana: Indiana bat Pollution and commercial caving threaten the Indiana bat, endangered since 1967. More recently, white-nose syndrome has killed many more while they hibernate in limestone caves. Louisiana: Louisiana pine snake As pine forests are logged, this point-nosed snake loses its habitat. The Louisiana pine snake is non-venomous and grows up to a meter and a half long. Conservationists estimate their population at a few thousand. Missouri: Ozark hellbender This curved salamander can live up to 50 years — if they can survive poaching, contaminated water and habitat loss. They hang out under rocks during the day, breathing through their skin. At night, they hunt insects and crayfish. New Jersey: Sei whale This mysterious 60-foot baleen whale likes the deep water far from coastlines. Until commercial whaling ended in 1987, the Sei whale was fair game. They’re seldom seen, but still occasionally get caught in fishing gear. Related: Ghost gear is haunting our oceans North Carolina: Carolina northern flying squirrel Only found in North Carolina, southwest Virginia and Tennessee, this ice-age flying squirrel is struggling to survive pollution and climate change . Pennsylvania: short-eared owl These owls nest in grassy areas, such as around the Philadelphia Airport. Developers and agricultural practices threaten their remaining nesting places. South Dakota: black-footed ferret The only ferret native to North America, fewer than 500 are left in South Dakota. These members of the weasel family rely on prairie dogs for food — and prairie dog populations are also decreasing. Via NetCredit Images via NetCredit and Ryan Moehring of USFWS

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Don’t forget to fight for these "less glamorous" endangered species

A green veil of plants protects this home from Ho Chi Minh City’s heat

February 20, 2019 by  
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In the heart of Ho Chi Minh City’s concrete jungle, a compact family home has been infused with greenery thanks to the work of Vietnamese architecture firm Vo Trong Nghia Architects . Dubbed the Breathing House, the property is located in an extremely dense neighborhood on a plot measuring just 12.8 feet in width and 58.4 feet in length. To provide a connection to nature despite the constrained urban conditions, the architects wrapped three sides of the home in a “green veil” made of creeper plants that grow on steel mesh. Edged in by buildings and accessible only via a tiny alleyway, the Breathing House makes the most of its small footprint with a staggered floor plan arranged around light wells that let natural light and ventilation deep inside the home. To open three sides of the house to the outdoors without compromising privacy, the architects wrapped the facade in a vertical green screen that not only protects against prying views, but also helps mitigate solar heat gain and improve air quality. This “green veil” was constructed using a modularized galvanized steel mesh and planter boxes installed at every floor. “Inside the ‘green veil’, the building consists of five tower-like volumes that are staggered and connected to each other, arranged in between the two boundary walls,” the architects said of the interior layout. “The external spaces created by the staggered arrangement of the volumes, which we call ‘micro voids’, play a role in providing myriad indirect lighting and ventilation routes throughout the building. In the narrow and deep plot shuttered by neighbors on both sides, it is more environmentally effective to promote ventilation for each corner of the house, by multiple ‘micro voids’, rather than having a singular large courtyard.” Related: Fruit trees grow on the roofs of this rammed earth home in Hanoi The “porous” arrangement of spaces helps create a sense of spaciousness in the home while reducing dependence on air conditioning . The “green veil”, which is visible to passersby, continues up to the roof terrace, creating what the architects said is a much-needed green space in a city that’s been losing green spaces at an alarming rate. + Vo Trong Nghia Architects Images by Hiroyuki Oki via Vo Trong Nghia Architects

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A green veil of plants protects this home from Ho Chi Minh City’s heat

VEJA unveils vegan sneakers made from corn waste

February 20, 2019 by  
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Ethical sneaker brand VEJA has unveiled its newest and arguably most impressive eco-friendly kicks yet — the Campo, a chic sneaker made with a new vegan and biodegradable fabric. The revolutionary material, called C.W.L., is made from a waxed canvas with 50 percent corn waste from the food industry. The Campo marks the first time C.W.L. has been used in the fashion industry. Developed by an Italian company, C.W.L. is organic cotton coated with PU and resin from the corn waste industry. With a look and touch comparable to leather, the bio-sourced material is VEJA’s ecological substitute for leather. “Since we started VEJA in 2005, we are always looking for new sustainable and more ecological raw materials,” VEJA said in a press release. “After five years of R&D and many failures to find an ecological substitute for leather, we finally found a revolutionary fabric.” The Campo, which is available in a variety of colors, uses C.W.L. for the upper and panels, recycled polyester — a B-Mesh (bottle-mesh) fabric created from recycled plastic bottles  — for the jersey lining and wild rubber sustainably sourced from the Amazonian forest for the insole and sole. As with all of VEJA’s shoes, the Campo sneakers are ethically made in Brazil in the region of Porto Alegre. Related: nat-2 creates a completely vegan sneaker made from coffee Launched this year, the new Campo model is an alternative to VEJA’s leather models. Forty percent of VEJA models are vegan for its spring/summer 2019 collection, which also includes the alternative-leather models Rio Branco and Nova. The Campo sneakers are now available for purchase online in six different varieties and start at 125 euros. + VEJA Images by Mario Simon Lafleur via VEJA

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VEJA unveils vegan sneakers made from corn waste

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