TAMassociati envisions a zero-emissions, future-proof urban development

December 3, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Venice-based architecture firm TAMassociati has teamed up with sa_partners and Franco Giorgetta Landscape Architect to design Porta del Ticino — Urban Living Lab, a future-proof masterplan for a large post-industrial site in the southern Swiss city of Bellinzona. Developed as part of an invited competition by the Canton, Municipality and SBB-Swiss Railways, the urban proposal reimagines the heart of the cantonal capital as a living organism that flexibly adapts to change over time with a systemic and non-linear approach. The large-scale masterplan also aims to achieve zero emissions with 100% renewable energy. The Porta del Ticino — Urban Living Lab outlines a plan to redevelop a 120,000-square-meter site currently dominated by the industrial complex of the Officine Bellinzona, the area’s most important heavy-industry company with over 130 years of history that will be relocated to a new site within a few years. To offset the future industrial development outside of the city, the design team has centered their proposed masterplan on a large public green lung — dubbed the Almenda — that will comprise 6.4 hectares of biotic area and 3.2 hectares of agricultural area to naturally regulate the city’s climate. Related: SOM designs a low-carbon waterfront community for China’s “most livable city” In addition to a spacious re-naturalized area, the development will also emphasize the site’s history with visual connections to the UNESCO World Heritage-listed Bellinzona Castle and the “Cathedral,” an industrial stone building iconic of the Officine Bellinzona factory. A mix of commercial, educational, administrative, residential and other development typologies will be integrated along a “green kilometer” that will link the river and mountains along a north-south route. The masterplan would be implemented in phases to allow for modular and flexible growth at variable speeds with reduced environmental impact. To ensure sustainable growth, the project follows an “eMergetic evaluation” concept that considers the entire building lifecycle to minimize the city’s carbon footprint . The proposal also includes planned energy policy objectives with zero-emission targets, renewable energy systems and environmental monitoring. + TAMassociati Images via TAMassociati

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TAMassociati envisions a zero-emissions, future-proof urban development

3XN unveils Denmarks first climate-positive hotel for Bornholm island

December 2, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

On the tiny Danish island of Bornholm, Hotel Green Solution House (GSH) will raise its eco-friendly charms with a new climate-positive wing designed by Copenhagen-based firm 3XN and its green think-tank, GXN. Slated for completion in summer 2021, the new extension will be entirely built, clad and insulated with timber materials for a carbon-neutral footprint. The hotel wing will incorporate upcycled materials from construction offcuts for the furnishings and surfaces. Opened in 2015, Hotel GSH was designed by 3XN and GXN to serve as an inspiring leader in green hospitality. An all-timber build was selected for the new wing for a reduced carbon footprint ; according to the International Environment Agency, approximately 40% of the world’s carbon emissions are attributed to the construction industry, with steel and concrete responsible for a total of 16%. Related: Low-impact geodesic dome hotel immerses guests in Patagonian nature “It is a privilege to work with a developer who is completely uncompromising in her approach to sustainability and the circular economy . In this way, the project is making the impossible a reality,” said Kasper Guldager Jensen, architect and partner at 3XN and founder of GXN. “In addition to creating the foundation for a successful business, I hope that the new project can help to show others the potential of wood construction. If we in Denmark want to be able to achieve our climate goals, the construction industry needs to think and act differently, and there is therefore a great need for lighthouse projects like this.” The new hotel wing at Hotel GSH will feature 24 rooms, a conference room and a rooftop spa. In addition to the use of upcycled materials, debris from local granite quarries in Bornholm will be repurposed as temperature-regulating décor in the conference room. The timber building will reduce its energy footprint with operable windows that let in natural daylight and ventilation. All components of the building are designed with reversible joints so that they can be reused in the future rather than end up as demolition waste. Construction of the new hotel wing is expected to begin this fall. + 3XN Images via 3XN

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3XN unveils Denmarks first climate-positive hotel for Bornholm island

Biophilic campus provides a safe haven for children with autism

November 30, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Austin-based architecture and interior design firm Runa Workshop has recently completed One of the Kids, a nature-inspired campus for children who have autism. In preparing for the project, the architects first needed to educate themselves on how to best suit the needs of the children. Then, the team had to decide how to create a welcoming, comfortable campus within a tight budget of just $800,000 for an approximately 8,000-square-foot space. Cost-effective materials, an emphasis on natural lighting and the incorporation of biophilic and green elements tie the campus together. Created as a local family’s passion project located just north of Austin , One of the Kids provides a safe haven for children with autism to learn and play. The clients sought a campus that would encourage the children to explore their surroundings without overstimulating them. As a result, the designers used biophilic design to create a calming yet inspiring atmosphere. Related: HIVE Project proposes biophilic, self-sufficient homes of the future “Nature has been proven to promote healing, so we incorporated biophilic design to help us achieve this connection,” the designers at Runa Workshop explained. “We maximized the amount of natural light in each therapy room and incorporated a view of nature or green space to tie back into the concept. The design allowed for a large space where children can interact with water and ‘grass’ in a well-lit space while burning off excess energy so they can better focus in their therapy sessions.” Cost-effective oriented strand board , large windows and green paint are used throughout to strengthen a connection to nature, from the green “mountains” painted on the walls to the turf in the play area. In addition to the creation of active social spaces, such as the large indoor/outdoor play area and an indoor pool, the designers also carved out “chill rooms” with low lighting and dark-colored walls to provide children a comfortable place to go calm down when they feel overwhelmed. + Runa Workshop Images via Runa Workshop

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Biophilic campus provides a safe haven for children with autism

10 eco-friendly holiday gift ideas for friends

November 27, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Too often, the giving season feels like a mad rush to check tasks off a list. It’s all too easy (and embarrassing) to wind up giving our friends and family junk gifts that we regret buying. Our  shopping  guide makes it simple to find sustainably made, easy-to-purchase presents that you can feel good about giving over the holidays. Spent grain pancakes Everybody has to eat, and anybody sane likes a good pancake. This  spent grain mix  is low carb, high  protein , contains lots of fiber and uses recycled grains. What?! That’s right, these pancakes are called “spent” because the barley flour comes from microbrewery castoffs. You and your pancake gift recipient will feel even better about breakfast knowing that Grain4Grain donates to a food bank every time somebody purchases a box. Related: How to make soy wax candles for a cozy, autumnal home Shoes by Allbirds Buying shoes can be intimate, so this one is for your close friends.  Allbirds , best known for its sneakers, also makes boat shoes, slip-ons and flats. Choose from shoes made from wool — supposedly these New Zealand sheep have a fabulous life — or, for your  vegan bestie, choose shoes made from responsibly sourced eucalyptus fiber. As a carbon-neutral company, Allbirds puts eco-thought into all aspects of business. The laces are made from recycled plastic bottles, the insoles use castor bean oil and even the shipping boxes are made from 90% recycled cardboard. Digital thrift store gift card Some friends are easier to shop for than others. For some particular people, it’s best to let them pick out their own  gifts . Help them shop sustainably with a digital thrift store gift card from Rent the Runway or thredUP. Upcycled clutch from Jungalow Jungalow  specializes in bright colors and bold botanical patterns. The company is the brainchild of  design  blogger Justina Blakeney. Now you can get Jungalow’s super lush upholstery fabrics in a clutch purse. These clutches use upholstery scraps that wound up on the cutting room floor. Your friend can carry it as a small purse, or keep important things organized inside the clutch while tossing it in a larger bag. Darling little tassels adorn the clutch’s zipper. Girlfriend Collective activewear Through  fashion  alchemy,  Girlfriend Collective  turns old fishing nets, plastic bottles and other trash into chic leggings, bras, socks, sweatsuits and shorts. The company has already sidetracked about 4.5 million plastic water bottles bound for a dubious fate. You can find clothing for all sizes, and even a maternity section on their website. Homemade sugar scrub For a low-cost yet personal gift with a sweet scent, make your friend a sugar scrub. All you need is  sugar , coconut oil (or similar) and a few drops of essential oil. Use the essential oil straight out of the bottle, or make a special blend for your friend. Scoop the scrub into a mason jar, tie a bow around it, and it’s ready to gift. Full details on making sugar scrubs are available at  The Simple Veganista . Malala Scrunchie With a  Malala scrunchi , your friend can secure her hair while simultaneously promoting  education  for girls. When you buy these hair holders, the money goes to the Malala Fund, named for the brave and beloved Pakistani heroine and kick-ass activist Malala Yousufzai. The scrunchies are made from sustainably sourced bamboo fabric and dyed with natural plant dyes, like turmeric for yellow, indigo for blue and madder root for pink. We like the pumpkin color for fall and winter. Cruelty-free, 10-free nail polish from Pear Nova Ten what? Bad ingredients: toluene, formaldehyde, formaldehyde resin, DBP, xylene, parabens, camphor, fragrances, phthalates or animal ingredients. Not sure what all those ingredients are? The bottom line is you probably don’t want them on your nails.  Pear Nova  products are 10-free, designed in  Chicago  and look much more stylish than your average drugstore nail polish. The inventive colors have fun names, such as Cleo F*ckin Patra, Rub My Temples, It’s Summer Somewhere and Rooftop ‘Til You Drop. Wine barrel Apple Watch strap In another clever example of  upcycling ,  Uncommon Goods  offers an upgrade for your Apple Watch strap. Your oenophile friend will feel good knowing that her new watch strap was once a French oak wine barrel. These straps are made in Austria and compatible with Apple Watch Series 5, 4 and 3. Eco travel kit In this pandemic  holiday  season, everybody wants things to go back to normal ASAP. Give the gift of optimism with this  eco travel kit . Your friend will smell delightful with naturally flavored lip balm, deodorant, moisturizer and perfume in grapefruit, bergamot and rose scents. She’ll nap beneath a silky eye mask and wake to note her thoughts in an artisan-crafted kite notebook. The kits come in a vegan leather case and also include earplugs, q-tips, hair ties, disposable face masks and Emergen-Cs. You can upgrade and personalize the Aria Kit with extra add-ons. Images via Grain4Grain , Katherine Gallagher / Inhabitat, thredUP , Jungalow , Girlfriend , Pixabay, HARA , Pear Nova , Uncommon Goods , and Aria Kit

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10 eco-friendly holiday gift ideas for friends

Inspiring mud-and-bamboo Anandaloy Building uplifts a Bangladeshi community

November 26, 2020 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

German architecture practice Studio Anna Heringer has received the international architecture prize OBEL AWARD 2020 for its work on the Anandaloy Building, an unconventional project combining sustainable construction and social development to catalyze local development in rural Bangladesh. Created to follow the practice’s motto that “architecture is a tool to improve lives,” the curved building was built by local villagers using locally sourced mud and bamboo and serves as both a community center for people with disabilities and a small workspace for producing fair textiles. The project’s name Anandaloy means ‘The Place of Deep Joy’ in the local Bengali dialect. Located in the northern Bangladeshi village of Rudrapur, the multifunctional community center was designed to celebrate diversity and inclusion — concepts that are particularly important for those with disabilities in Bangladesh, where having a disability is sometimes regarded as karmic punishment. The building also helps empower local women and counteract urban-rural migration with the clothes-making project Dipdii Textiles located on the first floor. The project supports local textile traditions with work opportunities. Related: Architects recycle shipping containers into a breezy Dhaka home “What I want to transmit with this building is that there is a lot of beauty in not following the typical standard pattern,” Anna Heringer said. “Anandaloy does not follow a simple rectangular layout. Rather, the building is dancing, and dancing with it is the ramp that follows it around. That ramp is essential, because it is the symbol of inclusion. It is the only ramp in the area, and as the most predominant thing about the building, it triggers a lot of questions. In that way, the architecture itself raises awareness of the importance of including everyone. Diversity is something beautiful and something to celebrate.” Local villagers of all ages and genders, including people with disabilities, built Anandaloy with a no-formwork mud construction technique called cob. Bamboo purchased from local farmers was also used for the structural components and the facade, which features a Vienna weaving pattern that the workers selected. The building completely runs on solar energy.  + Studio Anna Heringer Photography by Kurt Hoerbst via Studio Anna Heringer

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Inspiring mud-and-bamboo Anandaloy Building uplifts a Bangladeshi community

Reused teak and earthy stone make up a luxury Goan home with canal views

November 24, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

In the village of Solid in North Goa, international architecture practice SAV Architecture + Design has completed the Earth House, a luxury home of 700 square meters that makes the most of its lush, tropical surroundings. Set next to a canal lined with coconut trees, the expansive home has allowed the outdoors to shape its design, from the massing that’s built to preserve existing mature trees to the natural materials palette. Internal courtyards, louvered semi-open spaces and an open-plan layout help achieve an indoor/outdoor living experience that makes the tropical landscape the focus. The Earth House’s site-specific massing comprises a series of long bays that open up to views of the canal that wraps around the north side of the site. Folding glass doors and large, glazed openings connect the indoors to the outdoor living areas, where sheltered patios with cane furnishings and a long pool extend the footprint of the home toward the canal. Upstairs, private terraces extend the bedrooms to the outdoors to continue the home’s constant connection with nature. Related: Luxury home in Kerala produces all of its own energy Inside, the home is centered on a white Fibonacci-style spiral staircase that serves as a sculptural focal point and connects to a spacious, double-height living room that overlooks the pool and canal. Teak wood is used throughout — from the custom-crafted entrance door to the wooden artwork wall in the living room — and imbues the home with a sense of warmth in contrast to the cool Goan-Portuguese concrete floors. “With large overhangs and exposed concrete roofs, the house is designed to brace the Goan tropical rains,” the architects said. “The inner courtyards around tall existing trees as the several louvred spaces keep the house passively cool and well-ventilated in the tropical hot climate. Most of the glazing is double-glazed and is oriented towards the north to allow minimal heat and direct sunlight into the house. The lines and forms of the Earth House are designed to connect constantly with its outdoors, bringing nature and all its coconut palm filled views in a modern, crafted and fluid manner.” + SAV Architecture + Design Photography by Fabien Charuau via SAV Architecture + Design

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Reused teak and earthy stone make up a luxury Goan home with canal views

A geometric double roof promotes natural cooling at this Tropical Chalet

November 23, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

After three years of design and construction, Singapore-based firm G8A Architecture & Urban Planning has completed the Tropical Chalet, a naturally cooled home with a beautiful and functional “double roof facade.” Located in the Vietnamese coastal region of Danang, the four-bedroom family villa takes advantage of its lakeside location with a porous brick moucharabieh facade that brings in cooling cross breezes and also gives the beautiful home its distinctive appearance. The predominate use of rough brick — which covers the roof, walls and a portion of the open-air interior — is also a nod to Danang’s historic use of baked brickwork that dates back to the fourth century. Set on a roughly rectangular plot facing a lake, the Tropical Chalet lives up to its name with an indoor/outdoor design approach. A lush garden and spacious, landscaped backyard surrounds the L-shaped home, which opens up to the outdoors on all sides. Operable glazing, a porous brick facade and a recessed gallery help bring in natural light and ventilation while protecting against unwanted solar gain and mercurial coastal weather conditions. Related: Lush living plants engulf the green-roofed Pure Spa in Vietnam “Materials were were chosen not only for their sturdiness and climate resistance, particularly bricks with their high insulation qualities,” the architects explained. “But also, their minimal and natural aesthetic, once again blending with the surrounding landscape. A strong presence of wood, textured concrete and rough brick highlight the organic nature of the concept.” The building’s undulating roof is also engineered for natural cooling with a shape informed by site conditions; the geometry of the roof has led to a folded waxed concrete ceiling below that hides the structural framework of the terracotta-lined roof. The 400-square-meter Tropical Chalet rises to a height of two stories and includes a floor that’s partly buried underground and opens up to a sunken sculpture garden. + G8A Architecture & Urban Planning Photography by Oki Hiroyuki via G8A Architecture & Urban Planning

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A geometric double roof promotes natural cooling at this Tropical Chalet

Renowned landscape architects unveil designs to save the Tidal Basin

November 20, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

The National Mall Tidal Basin — also known as “America’s front yard” — is home to some of the nation’s most iconic landmarks such as the Jefferson Memorial, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial and the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial. But the beloved Washington, D.C. public space is under threat from daily flooding and is in urgent need of critical repairs and improvements. In a bid to save the celebrated landscape, five prestigious landscape architecture firms — DLANDstudio, GGN, Hood Design Studio, James Corner Field Operations and Reed Hilderbrand — have been tapped to reimagine the future of the Tidal Basin and National Mall. Keep reading for a preview of all the designs. In 2019, the National Trust for Historic Preservation banded together with the Trust for the National Mall, the National Parks Service, Skidmore Owings & Merrill (SOM) and American Express to launch the Tidal Basin Ideas Lab , an initiative seeking proposals to save the 107-acre Tidal Basin site in Washington, D.C. After months of preparation, the Tidal Basin Ideas Lab recently unveiled visionary proposals from five award-winning landscape architecture firms including New York City-based DLANDstudio, Seattle-based GGN, Oakland-based Hood Design Studio, New York City-based James Corner Field Operations and Cambridge-based Reed Hilderbrand. Each proposal not only responds to the pressing issues plaguing the area’s infrastructure but also examines ways to heighten the visitor experience through improved environmental and cultural considerations. Due to the pandemic, the proposals are presented in an online-only, museum-quality exhibition co-curated by New York City curator of design Donald Albrecht and Thomas Mellins, an architectural historian and independent curator. The public is invited to learn about the Tidal Basin’s history, which was completed in 1887 as a major hydrological feat as well as the ongoing challenges and comprehensive proposals. The public will also be able to give feedback and offer ideas on saving the Tidal Basin. “As part of ‘America’s front yard’, the Tidal Basin is home to some of the most iconic landmarks and traditions in the nation’s capital,” said Katherine Malone-France, Chief Preservation Officer of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. “Yet current conditions do not do justice to a landscape of such significance. With this new digital exhibition, we are excited to share and engage the public with creative thinking from five of the best landscape architecture firms in the world. These ideas explore ways to sustain this cultural landscape and its richly layered meanings for generations to come. This isn’t preservation as usual: this is preservation as innovation.” Related: BIG unveils sweeping overhaul to Smithsonian Campus Master Plan True to its name, the Tidal Basin Ideas Lab will be focused on cultivating bold ideas and promoting dialogue between designers, stakeholders and the public rather than choosing a single winner as is typical in design competitions. The exhibition will supplement the National Park Service’s mandated environmental review of the Tidal Basin as well as master planning and detailed design, which have not yet been completed but are integral to securing funding for construction and implementation. All five creative concepts, revealed late last month, celebrate and raise awareness of the Tidal Basin’s long history and have reimagined the cultural landscape to better meet modern safety and accessibility needs while addressing critical infrastructure repairs and improvements. DLANDstudio’s proposal makes bold steps of introducing extensions to the landscape in both the Tidal Basin and the Potomac River to reorient circulation. A long land bridge would connect the Jefferson Memorial and the White House, while a new jetty to the west would branch off of the Lincoln Memorial to house the relocated memorial to Martin Luther King, Jr. Flooding would be mitigated with sponge park wetlands , a reflective weir and a green security wall. GGN’s vision is an adaptive plan phased across three stages to conclude in 2090. The design uses ecological solutions to protect the landscape from forecasted sea level changes and also the potential adaptation and relocation of existing monuments. James Corner Field Operations has proposed three ideas for combating rising sea levels : Protect & Preserve, a scheme to keep the existing landscape intact with improved maintenance and engineering; Island Archipelago, in which flooding would be accepted as an inevitable reality and monuments would be elevated and treated as islands within the Tidal Basin; and Curate Entropy, another design where the site is allowed to flood and a careful balance is maintained between the Tidal Basin’s existing layout and the new landscape. Hood Design Studio focuses on reshaping the Tidal Basin with underrepresented narratives, from the stories of how wetlands were valued by Indigenous and enslaved peoples to promoting dialogue on rebuilding urban ecologies. Reed Hilderbrand’s design draws on the 1902 McMillan Plan, a comprehensive planning document that strongly influenced the urban planning and design of Washington, D.C., particularly with its proposal for a “Washington Commons,” a diverse and connected regional park system. The plan also encourages new interactions with the landscape with an uplands Cherry Walk, a Memorial Walk, a Marsh Walk and a new landform called Independence Rise that would accommodate rising water levels and connect back to the city with a pedestrian bridge. + Tidal Basin Ideas Lab Images via Tidal Basin Ideas Lab

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Renowned landscape architects unveil designs to save the Tidal Basin

Architects turn waste into trendy glamping shelters in Rotterdam

November 20, 2020 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

If you’ve ever looked at a dumpster and thought “with a little work, that could be a cool fort,” then you’ll certainly be interested in the ‘waste architecture’ in action at Culture Campsite. This is a campground in a parking lot in Rotterdam that is putting a whole new twist on camping while showing the world what waste architecture is and what it can do. Culture Campsite, located just 10 minutes from the heart of Rotterdam, doesn’t look like any other campground. There aren’t really tents here; you’ll find futuristic shelters made from recycled and repurposed items. Here, you can sleep in a feed silo, a calf shelter, an old delivery van and yes, even a dumpster. Each “tent” offers a totally unique camping experience. “At Culture Campsite, you’ll sleep in one of the different architectural objects made from upcycled and waste stream materials,” according to the property’s website. “They are smaller than a tiny house, more exciting than a tent and different from all glamping accommodations.” Related: This floating park in Rotterdam is made from recycled plastic waste If you’re hungry, go to the geodesic dome . This is where meals are served. There’s also a communal bathroom area for your other needs. The campground is full of plants and flowers, bright colors and lots of natural light, and the site is just a short walk to the city’s historic old harbor. It’s a lovely little oasis in an urban landscape. Many of the shelters at the campsite are designed by Mobile Urban Design (MUD). Boris Dujineveld, the founder of MUD said that the principle of waste architecture is “designing and sketching with the materials and objects that are available…playing with form, material and color leads to new insights and forms that cannot be imagined on a white sheet of paper.” Dujineveld is definitely right about that. Culture Campsite is like nowhere else on Earth … for now, at least. The concept of waste architecture looks pretty impressive here, and it’s only the beginning of how far this kind of upcycling in construction can go. The campsite sets a whole new bar for the concept of repurposing and shows the world how even a parking lot can transform into a vacation spot. Culture Campsite is currently closed for the season, but plans to reopen May 2021 with rates starting at $76 a night. + Culture Campsite Photography by Heeman-Fotografie via MUD

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Architects turn waste into trendy glamping shelters in Rotterdam

Prime Roots offers ready-made, plant-based holiday meals

November 17, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

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The pandemic is obviously creating many downsides for Thanksgiving this year. But one overlooked upside is that it will be much easier to eat what you really want to for the holidays without judgment. If you’re vegetarian, vegan or just cutting back on animal products, this is the perfect year to experiment with vegan meats without any hassle from the family. Plant-based meat producer Prime Roots is offering some special choices. If you’re craving plant-based versions of traditional foods like garlicky mashed potatoes or balsamic and bacon Brussels sprouts, Prime Roots will send them to you all cooked and ready to reheat. The Prime Roots Turkey Special even has something most vegan turkeys lack: legs. Yep, Prime Roots has fashioned little legs onto your mock bird so it looks much like its traditional meaty cousins. Related: 7 tips for a sustainable Thanksgiving celebration The secret to all Prime Roots’ flavor is koji, a substance sometimes called Japan’s national mold . Even if you’ve never heard of it, you’ve almost surely consumed some. The mold is added to cooked grains like barley or rice, then paired with a second product to become substances such as soy sauce, miso or sake. The result is a satisfying umami flavor. If you’re having a holiday away from your most carnivorous family members, this is the best year to try this. Remember when they were skeptical about that tofu dish you brought to the family party? You really don’t want to explain koji. Although this turkey does look and sound delicious enough to tempt meat-eaters, too. The folks at Prime Roots have a lot of goals, including making the food system more equitable and inclusive, educating people about decreasing their meat consumption and manufacturing nutritious, protein-filled products without the greenhouse gas emissions or cholesterol of real meat . “At Prime Roots, we make meals that matter for our planet, and for our connection to each other and food ,” co-founder Kimberlie Le says on the Prime Roots website. “I hope that one day we’ll be able to feed millions if not billions of people our delicious and sustainable foods. We’ll know that we are successful when every person on the planet has access to clean water and delicious and nutritious foods.” Check out the Prime Roots website for the new, seasonal meals, side dishes and limited-time holiday specials. + Prime Roots Images via Prime Roots

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Prime Roots offers ready-made, plant-based holiday meals

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