Beer prices expected to soar as climate change challenges barley production

October 17, 2018 by  
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Shrinking barley yields caused by climate change will be disrupting the beer industry in the coming decades. The grain is central to beer production, and a new study published on Monday signals trouble for brewers who rely on the failing crop. Beer is the most popular alcoholic beverage worldwide, and consumers are equally as dismayed by the report, which will cause a surge in beer prices up to two times its current cost for some nations. The shortages in barley production are caused by extreme weather that has intensified because of global warming . Both heat waves and droughts are expected to decimate the beer industry in the second half of the century. These events, which are predicted to occur every two or three years, are directly linked to rising temperatures. At the current expected rates of temperature rise, experts say the production drop is inevitable. Related: A beer crisis is brewing in Germany as bottle recycling slows amid heatwaves The study, published by researchers at the University of East Anglia, said that brewery troubles are minor in comparison to other challenges the planet will face from climate change. Among these are food security, fresh water and storm damage. Even so, the 3 to 17 percent drop in barley yields is disheartening for beer fans who will face shortages and price spikes. China is set to face the most shortages this century, with the U.S. as a runner up. Beer production in Germany and Russia will also fall on hard times, but Ireland, Italy, Canada and Poland will see the largest price increases. In Ireland, which is home to a popular brew culture, the price for a 500ml bottle could rise from $2.50 to a whopping $5. “Climate change will affect all of us, not only people who are in India or African countries,” said Dabo Guan, professor of climate change economics and lead author of the study. Guan emphasized the importance of recognizing that climate change is not something that developed nations will be immune to. Ultimately, the answer lies in supporting policies that reduce the emissions causing this climate disruption, and many companies are moving forward and instating their own regulations. One such company is Anheuser-Busch InBev, the world’s biggest brewing house, which is planning on cutting its emissions by 25 percent by 2025. The company is also working on a drought-resistant strain of barley that could offset shortages as well as strains that could be grown throughout the winter. Via Reuters Image via Raw Pixel

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Beer prices expected to soar as climate change challenges barley production

Weathered steel trees wrap around a solar-powered school building

October 17, 2018 by  
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Delft-based architectural office cepezed recently completed a solar-powered branch for Graafschap College in Doetinchem that — unlike most school buildings in the Netherlands — eschews natural gas in favor of a power supply that’s 100 percent electric. Built for the students of the Sports & Exercise and Safety & Craftsmanship departments, the new school building prioritizes a healthy indoor learning environment that maximizes access to natural daylight and views of the outdoors. In homage of the many oak trees that grow around the building, the architects partially wrapped the structure in tree-shaped weathered steel cladding that serves as a double skin for solar shading. Built to house approximately 700 students, the new Graafschap College branch at Sportpark Zuid features at its heart a large, light-filled atrium named The Midfield in reference to sports and teamwork. The Midfield is organized into a series of cascading terraces with large landing areas that serve as informal meeting spaces. The glass atrium roof floods The Midfield with natural light and is combined with sensor-enabled LED lighting to reduce reliance on artificial lighting. “In order to be able to look over the car park from the ground floor, and to give the building the appearance of a pavilion in green surroundings, the school has been elevated by a half-story and placed on a basement,” the architecture firm noted. “Beside the car park, the height difference is bridged by an elongated, landscaped staircase, which also incorporates a ramp.” Related: Green-roofed Copenhagen sports center is open to the public 24/7 For the facade, the architects installed alternating strips of glass and black aluminum panels to create a sleek and modern appearance. A second skin of perforated Corten steel cut into the shapes of oak trees is laid over the east, west and south facades of the building and helps deflect unwanted solar gain without preventing daylight from entering the building. cepezedinterieur handled the interior design, which also follows a contemporary aesthetic but with brighter colors and patterns that allude to sports and movement. In addition to solar panels, the school also uses solar boilers for water heating. + cepezed Photography by Lucas van der Wee via cepezed

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Weathered steel trees wrap around a solar-powered school building

This breezy, green-roofed home in Singapore embraces nature from all angles

October 17, 2018 by  
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Whereas many modern buildings in Singapore rebel against the country’s tropical climate with air-conditioned, hermetic spaces, international architecture firm Guz Architects decided instead to embrace the natural environment in its design of the Willow House. The single-family home takes on a breezy, pavilion-like appearance with open and well-ventilated spaces that tap into passive design principles and crosswinds for cooling. Draped in climbing plants and organized around ponds and gardens, the home feels like an extension of its lush surroundings. Spanning nearly 900 square meters, the Willow House was completed in 2012 for a young couple with three small children. “The house aimed to create dynamic spaces that encourage play and interaction,” the architects said. Surrounded by tall trees, the home is located in a private oasis of calm that looks a world apart from the dense urban environment  for which Singapore is famous. Oriented to optimize access to cooling breezes, the two-story residence is laid out in a L-shaped plan that wraps around a central courtyard with a pond. A single-story open veranda with an accessible rooftop garden anchors one side of the water courtyard and houses the primary living spaces. The other communal areas — such as the kitchen and dining room — as well as the concealed service areas are located on the ground floor, while the private areas are placed above on the first floor. The master bedroom and children’s bedrooms are placed on opposite sides of the first floor. Related: Lush green roof camouflages the Chameleon Villa into the Indonesian tropics A covered outdoor walkway on the first floor overlooks views of the roof garden and central courtyard , which comprises a large fishpond and a small island with trees. “The movement of water and fish brings life into the courtyard and draws the eye away from the building,” the architects said. In the area between the veranda and kitchen, the fishpond transitions into a shallow freshwater reflecting pond and finally transforms into a 3-meter-deep swimming pool that mirrors the home’s L-shaped layout. + Guz Architects Via ArchDaily Images by Patrick Bingham-Hall

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This breezy, green-roofed home in Singapore embraces nature from all angles

Your Mattress Might Have 10 Million Dust Mites

November 1, 2016 by  
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Could your very own bedroom be hazardous to your health? Yes, according to a new study that revealed dust found in a conventional home is laced with about 45 incredibly dangerous chemicals, including one known for causing cancer. That’s a big…

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Your Mattress Might Have 10 Million Dust Mites

Test finds glyphosate in California wines – even those grown organically

March 25, 2016 by  
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A toxic pesticide linked to cancer and autism, Glyphosate is pervasive in agriculture, and now a new study reveals it has even made its way into California wines. The testing, reported by national coalition for GMO awareness Moms Across America , found traces of glyphosate in 100 percent of wines evaluated, including organic and biodynamically produced wines that are made from grapes grown without direct pesticide applications. Ten different wines from Napa Valley, Sonoma, and Mendocino counties were all found to contain glyphosate, suggesting the chemical drifts from conventional farms and lands just about everywhere. Read the rest of Test finds glyphosate in California wines – even those grown organically

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World’s largest fog harvester produces water from thin air in the Moroccan desert

March 25, 2016 by  
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Moroccan NGO Dar Si Hamad has built the world’s largest fog harvester , which provides water for those in dire need of it. The massive installation measures 600 square meters (nearly 2,000 feet), and it puts fog harvesting into action for people living in arid, landlocked southwest Morocco . Read the rest of World’s largest fog harvester produces water from thin air in the Moroccan desert

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World’s largest fog harvester produces water from thin air in the Moroccan desert

New super-strain of E. coli resists all known antibiotics

December 21, 2015 by  
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If you’ve ever experienced food poisoning from E. coli , you already know just how unpleasant an infection can be. But what if there were no treatment on the market that could wipe out the bacteria? If a new study out of China is any indication, that might soon be our terrifying new reality. Read the rest of New super-strain of E. coli resists all known antibiotics

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New super-strain of E. coli resists all known antibiotics

Climate change may be lowering our sex drives

November 14, 2015 by  
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Its’ no secret that the birth rate has been dropping in the US, and there are numerous reasons for the drop. But a new study reveals that one of those reasons is one you might not expect: climate change . Studies show that fewer children are born nine months after really, really hot days. READ MORE > image via Shutterstock

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Climate change may be lowering our sex drives

Cutting back sugar in your child’s diet can improve their health in just 10 days

October 31, 2015 by  
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Tonight, while the kiddos are piling up the sugary good stuff, keep in mind this latest research: a new study in the journal Obesity reveals that cutting back on sugar for just 10 days can improve your child’s health. For 10 days, children in the study reduced their sugar intake by 28% without changing anything else in their diet. In just 10 days, diabetes markers, blood pressure, cholesterol and triglycerides were lowered. READ MORE > image via Shutterstock

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Cutting back sugar in your child’s diet can improve their health in just 10 days

Every year, 23,000 people end up in the ER because of herbal supplements and vitamins

October 20, 2015 by  
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You dutifully take your multi-vitamin and supplements every day with the goal of being as healthy as you can, but those substances may actually be doing more harm than good. Every year, 23,000 people end up in the emergency room because of vitamins and herbal supplements, according to a new study in the New England Journal of Medicine . And, thanks to the fact that supplements are essentially an unregulated market, that number isn’t going to go down anytime soon. Read the rest of Every year, 23,000 people end up in the ER because of herbal supplements and vitamins

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Every year, 23,000 people end up in the ER because of herbal supplements and vitamins

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