The Ocean Cleanup reveals the Interceptor to remove plastic pollution from rivers

October 29, 2019 by  
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After recently announcing its first success at collecting plastic waste from the Great Pacific Garbage Patch , The Ocean Cleanup team is widening efforts by addressing the main entry point of litter — rivers. To tackle the 1,000 rivers responsible for about 80 percent of global ocean plastic pollution, the nonprofit has deployed a new invention, the Interceptor. The Interceptor catches and collects plastic junk, preventing its flow from rivers into oceans. “To truly rid the oceans of plastic, what we need to do is two things. One, we need to clean up the legacy pollution , the stuff that has been accumulating for decades and doesn’t go away by itself. But, two, we need to close the tap, which means preventing more plastic from reaching the oceans in the first place,” shared Boyan Slat, CEO and founder of The Ocean Cleanup. “Rivers are the arteries that carry the trash from land to sea.” Related: The Ocean Cleanup has first success collecting plastic from Great Pacific Garbage Patch Development of the Interceptor began in 2015. As the company’s first scalable solution to stop the river rush of plastic entering oceans, the device is shaped like a catamaran and houses an anchor, conveyor belt, barge and dumpsters. It operates autonomously and can extract 50,000 kilograms of trash per day before needing to be emptied. The Interceptor is 100 percent solar-powered and operates 24/7 without noise or exhaust fumes. It is positioned where it does not interfere with vessel traffic nor harm the safety and movement of wildlife. How does it work? The Interceptor is anchored to the riverbed at the mouth of a river flowing to the ocean. With an on-board computer connected to the internet, it continually monitors performance, energy usage and component health. Guided by the Interceptor’s barrier, plastic waste flowing downstream is directed into the device’s aperture, where a conveyor belt delivers the debris to the shuttle. The shuttle then distributes the refuse across six dumpsters that are equally filled to capacity via sensor data. When capacity is almost full, the Interceptor automatically sends a text message alert to local operators to remove the barge and empty the dumpsters. The plastic pollution will be transported to local waste management facilities, and the barge will be returned to the Interceptor for another cycle. To date, three Interceptors are already operational in Indonesia, Malaysia and Vietnam. The Dominican Republic will receive the next Interceptor in the pipeline, while other countries are on the waitlist. In the United States, Los Angeles is finalizing agreements for an Interceptor of its own in the near future. A single Interceptor is currently priced at 700,000 euros (about $777,000). As production increases, Slat has said the cost will drop over time. Of course, the benefits of removing plastic far outweigh the cost of creating the devices. Slat explained, “Deploying Interceptors is even cheaper than deploying nothing at all.” + The Ocean Cleanup Image via The Ocean Cleanup

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The Ocean Cleanup reveals the Interceptor to remove plastic pollution from rivers

Brilliant Stanford invention makes hydrogen fuel-cell powered cars even greener

June 26, 2015 by  
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In the next few years hydrogen fuel-cell powered cars are going to become more readily available thanks to new models from Toyota, Honda and Hyundai. While automakers have labeled the fuel-cell vehicles as the ultimate green vehicle, since they only emit water, there’s a dirty secret that isn’t talked about. The process to produce hydrogen isn’t very green, but a new invention from Stanford University could change that. Read the rest of Brilliant Stanford invention makes hydrogen fuel-cell powered cars even greener Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: electric vehicle , fuel cell vehicle , green car , green transportation , Honda , hydrogen , hydrogen vehicle , HYUNDAI , stanford university , Toyota Mirai

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Brilliant Stanford invention makes hydrogen fuel-cell powered cars even greener

California poised to enact toughest mandatory vaccine bill in the nation

June 26, 2015 by  
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In California, an aggressive mandatory vaccination bill that passed the State Assembly is now headed to the desk of Governor Jerry Brown. If the bill passes, it would make California the third state in the country to enact such a measure, which will require all incoming public school kindergarteners to have full schedule vaccines, regardless of their parents’ personal, religious, or philosophical objections. Read the rest of California poised to enact toughest mandatory vaccine bill in the nation Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: banning personal and religious vaccine exemptions , California , california state assembly , children’s health , governor jerry brown , mandatory vaccinations , mandatory vaccines , mandatory vaccines for children , mandatory vaccines for school attendance , medical decisions for children , parental rights , SB277

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California poised to enact toughest mandatory vaccine bill in the nation

Seatylock: Brilliant Bicycle Saddle Conveniently Transforms into a Solid Metal Bicycle Lock

September 23, 2014 by  
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As urban cycling rises in popularity, so does theft. Rather than lugging around a heavy lock or removing your seat post to prevent saddle theft, there’s now a new invention in town that’s so ingenious and convenient you’ll wonder why you didn’t think of it first. Introducing Seatylock , a bicycle saddle that quickly transforms into a solid metal lock. Stretching over three feet long, Seatylock is long enough to secure your rear wheel and frame and comes in a variety of colors and sizes to suit all rider types. If you want to get your hands on a Seatylock, head over to its Kickstarter to bring this combined bicycle saddle and lock to production! + Seatylock Kickstarter The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bicycle , Bicycle Lock , bicycle saddle , bicycles , bikes , combined bicycle saddle and lock , kickstarter , reader submitted content , Seatylock

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Seatylock: Brilliant Bicycle Saddle Conveniently Transforms into a Solid Metal Bicycle Lock

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