Atolla combines technology with design to customize sustainable skincare

January 21, 2019 by  
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The skincare market has exploded with so many options that sometimes it feels like you need a PhD just to pick the right moisturizer. Costs seem to be rising right along with the breadth of product lines, so the pressure is on to find the right skincare in order to save yourself from money wasted on products that don’t perform for your skin type, not to mention the enormous amounts of packaging waste left behind from trial-and-error purchases. One entrepreneur feels your pain. Meghan Maupin, MIT grad and CEO of Atolla skincare, has taken a new approach to the entire skincare dilemma by bringing technology into the mix. The process begins with an at-home skin analysis via a kit and phone app. Based on the results, Atolla then formulates a custom serum. Each month, factors such as weather , oil production and changes in your skin during the month are taken into account, and a new serum is formulated. Atolla even evaluates the interaction with other products you use as well as age, diet, skin sensitivities and prior issues such as eczema or psoriasis. Computers evaluate the data based on skin imagery, allowing algorithms to calculate what is working and what is not. Related: Can drinkable sunscreen protect your skin from the inside out? Almost as important as effective skincare  is the customer’s satisfaction with the product they are using, so consumer preferences are also considered in the formula. For example, if the customer prefers a lightweight feel or doesn’t care for a particular scent, Atolla will adapt to those preferences. While working on her thesis, Maupin realized there is an extraordinary amount of waste in the beauty industry. From jars and squeeze tubes to products tossed out after a trial to the ingredients that end up in our waste stream, she feels that the best action we can take toward sustainability is to buy fewer products. She wants to accomplish this by ensuring the customer buys the right product the first time around. Related: Bambu Earth’s responsible soap & skincare is packaged with seeded paper To meet this goal, Atolla takes a different approach to skincare production. Maupin’s philosophy is to use quality ingredients to make fewer products in contrast to mass-producing standardized products that sit on the shelf before ending up in the waste stream. Along with creating effective, personalized products, the company strives to empower their customers with information about their skin, such as what ingredients to watch out for and how to create a skincare system that will help them meet long-term goals at an acceptable price point. Tests start at $10 and systems run up to $50 monthly. Customers report that the system is easy to use, which checks another box off everyone’s skincare goal list. + Atolla Via Core77 Images via Atolla

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Atolla combines technology with design to customize sustainable skincare

With climate change, the question is no longer “if” but “how sudden”

October 16, 2015 by  
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Climate change researchers have taken a new approach to calculating the effects of shifting global weather patterns by using existing data to estimate what immediate effects we might see from the projected changes. The question is no longer if climate change is happening, but rather how suddenly a cataclysmic event might occur. Read the rest of With climate change, the question is no longer “if” but “how sudden”

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With climate change, the question is no longer “if” but “how sudden”

8 Things You’d Never Know Were Made from Skateboard Decks

November 4, 2013 by  
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The skateboard culture has influenced fads and fashions from the time it first began. And now it has launched to a new approach to recycling. Art of Board, which launched in 2004, is leading the recycling movement in the skateboard …

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8 Things You’d Never Know Were Made from Skateboard Decks

Rethinking big water

October 23, 2013 by  
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Is it time for a new approach to municipal water infrastructure?

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Rethinking big water

Airport Using Worms to Help Reduce Waste

January 17, 2013 by  
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One of the nation’s busiest airports is taking a new approach to managing the half a pound of garbage that the average traveler generates per visit. The Charlotte (N.C.) Douglas International Airport has installed a vermicomposting system at its…

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Airport Using Worms to Help Reduce Waste

Jason Miller’s Modular LED System Is an “Endless” Beam of Bright Light

August 12, 2011 by  
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If you’re looking for a new approach to lighting your home in an eco-friendly way, perhaps this piece by designer Jason Miller for Roll & Hill Designers will do the job. Dubbed “Endless”, this LED lighting system is made of half-cylinder pieces that connect end to end to create various lengths and shapes. They can also be mounted to a wall or hung as independent light fixtures, depending on your needs. Sleek and simple enough for an office, but unique enough to place in a hip cafe , the the dark accents gives Endless a versatile, modern twist. Read the rest of Jason Miller’s Modular LED System Is an “Endless” Beam of Bright Light Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco lighting , endless led , energy efficient lighting , green interiors , green lighting , Jason Miller , LED , LED lamps , LED lighting , modular furniture , modular lighting , Roll & Hill Designers

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Jason Miller’s Modular LED System Is an “Endless” Beam of Bright Light

Put a Fork In It: Artist Creates Metal Bodice Out of Recycled Forks for Her 40th Birthday

August 12, 2011 by  
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Artist Laura Ann Jacobs wanted to do something symbolic when she turned forty (typically a cringe-worthy number for many women), so she invited her San Francisco area friends to a “Put a fork in it, I’m NOT Done” birthday fete. She asked everyone to bring over a mismatched fork – you know, the one that doesn’t seem to go with anything in the utensils drawer? – and participate in a cutting and melting down ceremony of the utensils to create a new sculpture and prove the point that life can be re-invented. The resulting bodice-shaped sculpture is made completely of recycled materials, and word on the street is that Lady Gaga is a fan! + Laura Ann Jacobs The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , eco-art , fork art , green art , green design , laura ann jacobs , put a fork in it , recycled art , recycled forks , sustainable art , sustainable design

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Put a Fork In It: Artist Creates Metal Bodice Out of Recycled Forks for Her 40th Birthday

What Innovation Looks Like and How to Make It Happen

October 20, 2010 by  
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Rob Shelton, director at the consultancy PRTM and co-author of "Making Innovation Work," draws out sustainability and innovation leaders from Procter & Gamble and Waste Management about how their very traditional firms are taking a new approach to business.

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What Innovation Looks Like and How to Make It Happen

Using Rocket Science (Literally!) for Carbon Capture

July 13, 2010 by  
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Capturing carbon dioxide from exhaust in order to reduce emissions levels has seemed as difficult as rocket science. And now, some rocket science may provide a solution to the difficult problem of extracting CO2 from industrial exhausts. Rocket nozzles are being studied as part of a new approach to capturing carbon dioxide from the smokestacks of coal power plants and other heavy emissions sites.

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Using Rocket Science (Literally!) for Carbon Capture

University of Tokyo Supercomputer Named World’s Greenest

July 13, 2010 by  
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Supercomputers and the environment:  two subjects that are becoming linked more and more these days.  Supercomputers are running algorithms to find solutions to climate change and the government has funded the creation of one supercomputer to be devoted solely to climate change .  Now, it seems the world’s supercomputers are competing to be the greenest, or at least the most efficient.

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University of Tokyo Supercomputer Named World’s Greenest

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