BIGs battleship-inspired LEED Gold office opens in Philadelphia

November 4, 2016 by  
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Located at the Navy Yard Corporate Center, the four-story office building design was shaped by Robert Stern’s 1,200-acre Navy Yard master plan of rectangular city blocks and James Corner Field Operations’ award-winning circular Central Green Park . The building’s double-curved facade bows inward on two sides in reference to the docked battleships nearby and to respond to the “shock wave” of the park’s circular running track. In addition to the maritime-inspired facade, a functioning periscope is inserted in the heart of the building to project views of the Navy Yard basin into the center of the elevator lobby and to bring in additional natural light. Related: James Corner Field Operations designs an iconic circular park for the Philadelphia Navy Yard “In many cases, architects design big, boxy buildings that could be placed anywhere and don’t connect directly to the site,” said Kai-Uwe Bergmann, AIA, RIBA, Partner, BIG. “You would really be hard-pressed to place 1200 Intrepid anywhere else, due to how it connects with its surroundings. Our commission involved creating a speculative office building, for which no tenants were committed. The key challenge here was to create a reason for tenants to be here with the constraint of a stringent budget.” Liberty Property Trust developed the 92,000-square-foot LEED Gold building. Precast concrete panels of varying sizes clad the exterior in a basket-weave pattern. The panels were locally manufactured using locally sourced materials that include recycled and recyclable content to reduce construction waste. + Bjarke Ingel Group Images via Bjarke Ingel Group

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BIGs battleship-inspired LEED Gold office opens in Philadelphia

Nissans e-NV200 van is transformed into the worlds first all-electric mobile workspace

November 4, 2016 by  
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NGESYkvDN-w&feature=youtu.be The e-NV200 WORKSPACe concept meets all the needs of the worker who hates to be stuck in the office. LED lights controlled by your smartphone, wireless phone charging capabilities, and a touchscreen computer make the tiny space incredibly user-friendly, while a mount for a foldable Brompton Bike allows gives workers the option to hit the trail during breaks. Related: The 10 best electric vehicles for every buyer Daylight pours into the workspace through a panoramic glass roof, illuminating the bright color scheme inside. The space is equipped to handle one person or two co-workers on laptops with mounts for two desk chairs. Alternatively, sitting outside on the pull-out floating desk gives more room and a front row seat to the natural surroundings. A central console contains a drawer-system mini-fridge and wireless smartphone charging dock and the fold-down desk reveals a touchscreen computer, wireless mouse and keyboard, and plenty of storage for office supplies. Nissan ’s electric van combines the best from its Leaf and NV200 models into a vehicle which can run on just £2 per 100 miles. The e-NV200 WORKSPACe technology and design can be seen as an attempt to keep up with the amount of co-working and hot-desking spaces around the globe, which grew 36 percent in 2015 . A few years from now, we could see several electric, mobile workspaces popping up closer to home. + Nissan + Studio Hardie Via Design Taxi Images via Studio Hardie

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Nissans e-NV200 van is transformed into the worlds first all-electric mobile workspace

LA architecture students design innovative houses for the homeless

November 4, 2016 by  
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Like many major cities, Los Angeles is currently in the middle of a housing crisis. Homeless populations are exploding, with encampments appearing on sidewalks, in parks, near overpasses, and along bridges through the city. While city officials are working on a ballot initiative to build 8,000 to 10,000 units to bring the homeless in off the streets, it could take years for those units to become available even if the measure passes. In response to the situation, students from University of Southern California’s School of Architecture have stepped up to create innovative new structures to shelter the homeless. The project is called the Homeless Studio , and it’s made up of 11 fourth year architecture students. Their solutions run the gamut from temporary shelters to expandable modular buildings. When the structures are complete, the students will deliver them to homeless people around the city, and an agency that supports the homeless in the San Fernando Valley will use their final project as a prototype shelter. Related: Brilliant sleeping bag transforms into a tent to provide shelter for homeless Rather than simply attending lectures by experts, the students have also done some intense on the ground research by meeting and talking to homeless people throughout the city. Organizations like Midnight Mission and Skid Row Housing Trust helped connect the students to real people, so they could better understand the day-to-day challenges their shelters would have to overcome. Some of the students used solutions they saw in practice on the streets – using reclaimed materials to create temporary shelters. Students Alexxa Soloman, Maria Ceja, and Belinda Park used scavenged shipping palettes, Ikea shelves, and pieces of plywood in their construction. Their classmates Jeremy Carman and Jayson Champlain took a different approach, creating a blue, rectangular box coated in fiberglass that expands outward to create sleeping and storage space. The designs are more than just a way for their occupants to stay warm and dry: they’re also a way to restore dignity to a population that too often has gone without it. Related: Homeless folks help feed their entire shelter with this flourishing rooftop garden For their final, the students are collaborating on the design for a temporary housing development for Hope of the Valley Rescue Mission . The agency plans to take the class’s plans, renderings, and full-scale prototype to help fundraise the final project. While a site hasn’t yet been selected, the plan complies with requirements for any commercial or industrial zoning. + The Homeless Studio Via Wired  

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LA architecture students design innovative houses for the homeless

Bjarke Ingels defies gravity with new office building for Philadelphia’s Navy Yard

July 9, 2015 by  
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Philadelphia ’s historic Navy Yard office park is home to a new project designed by starchitect Bjarke Ingels . The 1200 Intrepid office building will be the latest in a string of American projects for the Danish architect. With a $35 million pricetag, the office building design will result in an optical illusion that makes this four-story structure appear to be leaning or, as the design firm says, “defying gravity.” Read the rest of Bjarke Ingels defies gravity with new office building for Philadelphia’s Navy Yard Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: big , bjarke ingels , Bjarke Ingels Group , pennsylvania office building , philadelphia , philadelphia navy yard , philadelphia office building

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Bjarke Ingels defies gravity with new office building for Philadelphia’s Navy Yard

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