Astronomer maps massive hydrogen clouds zipping through space

December 6, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

In the halo of the Milky Way , there are mysterious gigantic clouds that zoom around at high speeds through space, and we may have finally unlocked a key that will help us understand them. Using telescopes, a scientist has created a detailed map of the clouds, revealing clumps, branches and filaments that have never been seen before. Astronomer Dr. Tobais Westmeier at the University of Western Australia node of the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research created a map that helps us understand these space phenomena. It revealed massive clouds of hydrogen: some are 80,000 light-years in diameter and have millions of times the mass of the sun. They move incredibly fast, between 43 and 56 miles per second. And they cover up to 13 percent of the sky. Related: Scientists find a massive black hole swirling in the Milky Way Scientists don’t know where these clouds originated, but some suggest that they could be leftover material from the formation of the galaxy, material falling into or out of our galaxy, or from interaction with nearby Large and Small Magellanic clouds. Dr. Westmeier has made the map available to anyone so that we can continue to learn more about these incredible formations. Via Science Alert

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Astronomer maps massive hydrogen clouds zipping through space

This wild Brussels restaurant is topped with a tank of slithering eels

December 6, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

This tiny restaurant in Brussels is topped with an aquaponic farm that grows eels! Leopold Banchini Architects designed the unique space where clients literally eat under the fish tank. The Aquaponic Eel bar, located at the Recyclart Gallery in Brussels, is an experimental fishery that produces both the meet and the herbs necessary to cook the famous Belgium dish Paling in ‘t groen. The Aquaponic Eel bar was inspired by the mysterious reproductive cycle of the European Eel, which transforms several times during its lifetime. Although the eel has become the primary ingredient in a famous Belgian dish, this animal has been notoriously hard to breed in captivity. Related: IKEA’s Space10 is working on on-site hydroponic farms for restaurants The eels above produce excretions that serve as nutrients for the plants, while the plants filter the water for the fish. The entire food production cycle happens in and around the metal structure, providing visitors with an unforgettable dining experience. + Leopold Banchini Architects + Café Recylart Photos by Dylan Perrenoud

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This wild Brussels restaurant is topped with a tank of slithering eels

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