EPA ends "always-in" clean air policy opposed by fossil fuel companies

January 26, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on EPA ends "always-in" clean air policy opposed by fossil fuel companies

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is withdrawing a key  Clean Air Act provision. They’re reversing the “once-in always-in” policy for major sources of pollution , which requires sources like  power plants , to always be classified as a major source. Under the new change, if a source “limits its potential to emit below major source thresholds,” per the EPA , it can be reclassified as an area source. What’s the impact of all this? According to a statement from Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) clean air director John Walke, “This is among the most dangerous actions that the Trump EPA has taken yet against public health .” The EPA , in their own words, is “reducing regulatory burdens.” They’re withdrawing a policy “for the classification of major sources of hazardous air pollutants under section 112 of the Clean Air Act.” According to Reuters, the “once-in always-in” policy was established in 1995. The agency said it had acted as a disincentive for sources to put pollution abatement and prevention attempts in place, “or to pursue technological innovations that would reduce hazardous air pollution emissions .” Reuters reported the petroleum industry, utilities, and others sought the withdrawal. Related: EPA cancels plan to clean up polluting Texas coal plants A major source emits or could emit 10 tons a year of any risky air pollutant, according to the EPA, or 25 tons or more of a combination of air pollutants a year. Area sources are those with emissions under that threshold, and according to Reuters, are subject to pollution control standards that aren’t as strict as those for major sources. The NRDC doesn’t agree with the move. Walke said it would “allow the greatest increase in hazardous air pollutants in our nation’s history.” “This move drastically weakens protective limits on air pollutants like arsenic, lead, mercury, and other toxins that cause cancer, brain damage, infertility, developmental problems, and even death,” he said in a statement. “And those harmed most would be nearby communities already suffering a legacy of pollution.” + Environmental Protection Agency Via Reuters and the Natural Resources Defense Council Images via Depositphotos ( 1 , 2 )

Originally posted here: 
EPA ends "always-in" clean air policy opposed by fossil fuel companies

Electric off-road motorcycle with 50-mile range is ready for when the paved road ends

January 26, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Electric off-road motorcycle with 50-mile range is ready for when the paved road ends

Today there are plenty of electric motorcycle options, but no so many if you want an electric dirt bike. That’s why Cake might be just what you’re looking for. Cake’s specialty is lightweight electric off-road motorcycles and the company recently announced that it is taking pre-orders for a special edition off-road motorcycle called KALK. The Cake KALK is an all-electric off-road motorcycle that’s ready for when the paved road ends. It has unique minimalistic style, a range up to 50 miles and a top speed of 50 mph. The KALK also only weighs 150 pounds, which is around 100 pounds lighter than a typical off-road motorcycle. ”With a clear mission to contribute speeding up the transition towards a zero-emission society, Cake aims to turn the motorized two-wheeled future upside down,” said Stefan Ytterborn, founder and CEO of Cake. “Light, silent and clean electric off-road motorbikes will make the era of noise, disturbance, pollution and complexity a thing of the past. The category will evolve into an independent pursuit, offering action and magic in combination with responsibility and respect towards people and planet.” Pricing for the KALK starts at $14,000 and Cake requires a $1,000 deposit. Images @Cake +Cake

Continued here: 
Electric off-road motorcycle with 50-mile range is ready for when the paved road ends

How urban consumption lies at the root of deforestation

July 29, 2016 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on How urban consumption lies at the root of deforestation

Increasing urban consumption contributes massively to deforestation, a major source of emissions, despite growing sustainability efforts.

Excerpt from:
How urban consumption lies at the root of deforestation

First US Tar Sands Project Approved in Utah

September 15, 2010 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on First US Tar Sands Project Approved in Utah

This is what the tar sands did to Alberta’s boreal forests. Image via Boreal Song Bird Initiative You’ve likely heard about the infamous Tar Sands in Alberta, Canada. They’re a major source of controversy in the energy world and the environmental community (to put it lightly), and for good reason

Read the original post: 
First US Tar Sands Project Approved in Utah

Bad Behavior has blocked 1023 access attempts in the last 7 days.