BIG and Silvio d’Ascia’s loopy design wins Paris metro station competition

November 10, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on BIG and Silvio d’Ascia’s loopy design wins Paris metro station competition

Danish firm Bjarke Ingels Group together with French studio Silvio d’Ascia Architecture won the design competition for a unique project in Paris, which will contribute a looping metro station to the expansion of the existing transportation system . BIG and Silvio d’Ascia designed the Pont de Bondy station as part of the Grand Paris Express, a stretch which will add 124 miles to the Paris metro system. The station looks like a giant P-shaped loop-de-loop with a pedestrian overpass spanning across a pool of water, running parallel to a vehicular bridge. The Pont de Bondy station is planned for Paris’ Line 15, a suburban route that circles the city’s periphery. BIG and Silvio d’Ascia Architecture designed the station in deep terracotta, with a central loop housing a covered concourse. Two wings extend outward from the concourse, forming a right angle, with one stretching out under a flyover and the other holding a pedestrian walkway over a pool of water. Pont de Bondy will be among nine “emblematic stations” on the expanded metro network that elevates public transportation to an art with elaborate modern architecture and sculptural designs. Related: Kengo Kuma wins design competition for new Paris metro station Elsewhere in the Paris metro expansion, 10 more new stations are planned and city leaders have so far named six other architects to design those stations; all of that is just for Line 15. In total, there are now 37 teams of architects working on 68 new stations for the Grand Paris Express, marking an epic investment in city infrastructure. The entire Grand Paris Express project, including all new stations and lines, are expected to be up and running by 2030. Via Dezeen Images via BIG and Wikipedia

Read the original post:
BIG and Silvio d’Ascia’s loopy design wins Paris metro station competition

Boeing and HRL win Guinness World Record for world’s lightest metal

November 10, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Boeing and HRL win Guinness World Record for world’s lightest metal

Boeing and HRL Laboratories created a metal microlattice that has been awarded the Guinness World Record for the world’s lightest metal . The entire structure of the microlattice is 99.99 percent air, making it 100 times lighter than styrofoam. Perhaps the most interesting thing about the new metal is not its light weight, but the fact that it was created to emulate human cell structure. It’s far from a bionic metal, but it illustrates that developing technology to mimic nature can help us achieve great things. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6N_4jGJADY While the weight of a material is often associated with its strength, that isn’t always the case. For many applications, the use of a lighter material can lend a number of benefits in terms of durability and flexibility, all important considerations where all sorts of structures are concerned. Like human bones, which are porous, the microlattice is incredibly strong despite being mostly air. Its spindly structure is capable of absorbing and distributing force to reduce damage. The team placed the metal microlattice atop the delicate head of a dandelion (already gone to seed) to demonstrate its ultra light weight. Related: Scientists develop world’s lightest metal, 100x times lighter than styrofoam Boeing’s new metal microlattice is made from nickel phosphorus and is approximately 100 times lighter than styrofoam. While the aerospace company is certainly looking forward to potential applications in commercial airplane wings, the lightweight yet durable microlattice could have other uses in vehicle engines, military protective gear, and possible even in the medical world. Because of the way the microlattice’s structure mimics porous human cells, it could someday be used to develop an artificial lung. The microlattice is the product of several years of research and development, and initially introduced in 2011 . The Guinness World Record was just awarded last year , after a long application and review process. Via ArchDaily Images via Boeing

Read the original post:
Boeing and HRL win Guinness World Record for world’s lightest metal

Rainforest Retreat is a nature lovers escape with minimal building impact

November 10, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Rainforest Retreat is a nature lovers escape with minimal building impact

Hidden away in the British Columbia rainforest, the 825-square-foot cabin enjoys privacy and its many windows offer carefully framed views of the landscape. The building is handsomely clad in locally milled Douglas Fir and Red Cedar, which lend the cabin a sense of warmth, while helping it blend into the surroundings. The use of timber is repeated in the interior, where it is complemented by large white surfaces for a clean and contemporary appearance. Shade from the trees and cross-breezes naturally cool the building. Related: Modern timber-framed cabin is hidden high among the tree canopy of a Swedish island “The client’s wishes for simplicity, gentle exterior appearance, a small footprint, and abundant natural light set the stage for an open sculptural form,” writes Agathom. “Great effort was taken to minimize the building’s impact on the site, resulting in a long, slim structure. Slightly twisting two main blocks of the plan, and overlapping those shapes, made a building modest in area ever expansive and full of unexpected depth.” Custom lighting enhances forest views in the dark and a periscope light was installed to guide the client when outdoors. The Rainforest Retreat was this year’s Architizer A+ Awards winner in the Popular Choice category for Private House XS. + Agathom Via Dezeen Images via Agathom

View original post here:
Rainforest Retreat is a nature lovers escape with minimal building impact

Bad Behavior has blocked 4993 access attempts in the last 7 days.