Biomega unveils an affordable, lightweight electric car inspired by minimalism

December 5, 2018 by  
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Known for its electric bike designs , Danish firm Biomega is now branching out into the electric car sector. The company has just unveiled its first electric car , called the SIN. Designed for urban environments, the SIN is a low-cost, lightweight electric car that runs on a 14kWh battery pack and is estimated to go up to 100 miles on a single charge. The SIN’s minimalist appearance was inspired by Scandinavian design principles of creating more with less. The body of the  electric car is comprised of modular carbon fiber to reduce its weight and enable optimal battery consumption. Stripped back to provide more space, the interior is made up of perforated mesh seats and an aluminum crossbeam that supports the steering wheel, which is connected to the car’s “info-tainment” tablet. An extra-wide windshield that extends over the roof of the car and transparent side doors were designed specifically to maximize the road views. Related: Biomega’s Boston folding bike: world’s first theft-proof bicycle? As far as power goes, the car runs on four independent engines powered by the main 14kWh battery , which is located under the floor. According to Biomega, the SIN can go from 0 to 60 miles per hour in approximately 13 seconds and can reach a top speed of 80 miles per hour. More importantly for drivers, the battery is estimated to let the car run up to 100 miles on a single charge. Biomega founder Jens Martin Skibsted explained that after years of designing high-tech electric bikes, an electric car was the logical next step for the company. “We’ve been focused on urban mobility since the 1990s,” Skibsted said. “Biomega has always been about creating a paradigm shift in the way society imagines transportation . We feel that we are in an extremely strong position to design an electric vehicle (EV) that represents the frontier of the new mobility.” Recently unveiled at the Shanghai CIEE trade fair, the SIN, which is expected to come with a $20,000 price tag, is due to hit the market sometime between 2021-2023. + Biomega Via Dezeen Images via Biomega

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Biomega unveils an affordable, lightweight electric car inspired by minimalism

Dutch designer creates leather alternative from palm leaves

December 5, 2018 by  
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The leather industry has taken a beating from conscientious consumers for decades, and for a variety of reasons. Firstly, the chemicals used in leather processing are toxic to humans and the environment. Animal advocates are also vocal about protecting the animals used to produce leather. So opponents of leather are always seeking alternatives. One Dutch designer, Tjeerd Veenhoven, is doing his part by developing leather look-alike rugs from palm leaves, called palm leather. Rather than relying on the resource-consuming practice of raising cattle, Veenhoven sources his materials from some of the 80 million trees currently growing naturally, creating a sustainable option to traditional leather. Related: A former leather tannery is transformed into an apartment trio in Lisbon Curiosity launched the invention when Veenhoven became intrigued by the pattern and texture of the palm leaf and asked a friend in India to send him some to experiment with. Although naturally brittle, he found that with glycerin, water and a few other materials he could soften the palm and give it better pliable qualities. Veenhoven’s motivation stems from the belief that producing less meat sources both for food and materials will benefit the planet through the reduction of required resources and the increase in plant systems that are more sustainable. Because of this belief, the processing of palm leather aims to use minimal water compared to cotton or leather and uses no harmful chemicals. In fact, all ingredients could be consumed by humans and are safe to return to nature. Bouncing around from his initial production in Holland, the manufacturing moved to India and then to the Dominican Republic where they are produced now with an emphasis on green initiatives. Related: Nike calls “Flyleather” its most sustainable leather material yet The rugs are assembled with small strips of the palm leather pressed together and mounted to a woven base, which can be produced in a variety of colors to suit different decor needs. The future of palm leather looks promising as other industries begin to notice it and the company focuses on other products that can be made with it. For example, car manufacturers striving to replace leather seats with a vegan option are eager to consider palm leather as an alternative. + Studio Tjeerd Veenhoven Via Dezeen Images via Tjeerd Veenhoven    

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Dutch designer creates leather alternative from palm leaves

Vacant lots are being transformed into urban bee farms in Detroit

February 9, 2018 by  
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“Work hard, stay bumble,” is the motto of Detroit nonprofit Detroit Hives . The organization aims to conserve honeybees by turning abandoned urban lots into community bee farms. Timothy Paule and Nicole Lindsey started the nonprofit last year, and so far they’ve transformed one lot into a space with vegetable garden plots and three hives – and they’re just getting started. Something’s buzzing in Detroit. Detroit Hives is tackling a few issues, namely honeybee conservation , blight in the city created by vacant lots , and educating the community on bees . Paule told HuffPost the inspiration came from a cold that just wouldn’t go away. A local market worker told him to try local honey for its medicinal properties. He and Lindsey also began to realize how urban blight might play a part in allergies, as overgrown ragweeds took over. They could tackle that issue by producing local honey on vacant sites. Related: America’s first urban ‘agrihood’ feeds 2,000 households for free Lindsey and Paule took beekeeping courses and purchased their first vacant lot for $340 on Detroit’s East Side. Thousands of bees now buzz on the lot, and the neighbors love the farm, according to Lindsey. We transform Detroit Vacant lots into urban bee farms. We are responsible for a quarter of a million honey bees in the East Warren community and we offer tours and bee education for the community. Work Hard, Stay Bumble. #DetroitHives #Savethebees #UrbanBeekeeper #UrbanBeeFarm #Detroit #Michigan #PureMichigan #Nonprofit #VizzeeInc #Honey #Support #Donate #Canon #Beekeeper A post shared by Detroit Hives (@detroithives) on Aug 25, 2017 at 2:47pm PDT She told HuffPost, “They say they wish we were there 10, 20 years ago. That area has always been a place where people dump trash, so when we came there, we gave that area a sense of purpose. The neighbors keep an eye on the area to make sure that people aren’t dumping anymore.” We bring bee consciousness to your community by transforming blighted land into honey bee conservations. #beekeeping #DetroitHives #Michigan #PureMichigan #DNR #MDNR #urbanbeekeeper #blackgirlmagic #beeeducation #rawhoney #adidasoriginals #blackbeekeepers #blackbeekeeper A post shared by Detroit Hives (@detroithives) on Aug 4, 2017 at 10:58am PDT Per Black Enterprise, Detroit Hives has partnered with local vendors like The Black Bottom Brewery, Detroit Soup, and a homeless shelter to provide local, raw honey, and they also sell their sweet product. They offer public tours and speak at schools in the area to help the community learn more about bees. They aim to expand beyond their first farm this year. + Detroit Hives Via Black Enterprise and HuffPost Images via Eric Ward on Unsplash and Massimiliano Latella on Unsplash

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Vacant lots are being transformed into urban bee farms in Detroit

Inhofe: "I proudly declare 2009 as the ‘Year of the Skeptic’"

November 19, 2009 by  
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Photo via Green Inc. Senator James Inhofe of Oklahoma has always been a thorn in the side of environmentalists, especially when it comes to climate change. He doesn’t believe in the science and has pledged to go to the international climate negotiations in Copenhagen in December to bare witness to the “fraud.” Inhofe believes that 2009 was a good year for climate change deniers and he believes they are winning the fight for the public’s hearts and minds

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Inhofe: "I proudly declare 2009 as the ‘Year of the Skeptic’"

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