Green roofs can improve air quality inside buildings

April 15, 2019 by  
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A new study has found that green roofs do a lot more than just provide extra space to grow plants. These eco-friendly roofs can also enhance air quality inside of buildings by reducing the ozone levels that come in from the outdoors. Scientists at Portland State University conducted the study at a large commercial building in Portland. Researchers installed devices on the roof, which was split between a traditional membrane and a green roof. The devices measured ozone levels of the air surrounding the building. They discovered that plants on the roof helped to trap ozone, preventing it from coming into the building. Related: 9 ways to add more houseplants to your home The new study adds to the growing list of green roof benefits. According to Phys.org , this includes the ability to filter carbon dioxide, cut down on excess water runoff after big storms and reduce heat in urban environments. Not to mention all of the veggies and plants that can be grown, cultivated and even shared with the local community. But how does the vegetation trap ozone and remove it from the air? The process of trapping ozone is called dry deposition, where particles in the air accumulate on solid surfaces. The process of dry deposition is completely natural and has been proven to be an effective way of filtering air. Prior to the new research, however, scientists did not know that a green roof could actually improve air quality indoors. It should be noted that the study, which was published last month in Building and Environment, only took place over a few days. The scientists who led the research effort have admitted that more studies that measure pollutants trapped over a long period should be completed. They also want to look at other pollutants other than just ozone. Once this happens, we will better understand the broader benefits of green roofs and just how much they can contribute to better indoor air quality. + Portland State University Via Phys.org Image via Urformat

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3GATTI hopes to land a ‘green spaceship’ in Madrid

April 15, 2019 by  
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3GATTI Architecture Studio has unveiled a spectacular design for a new public library in Madrid. The firm envisions an eye-catching “green spaceship” for the public space; it is a building almost entirely clad in lush Virginia creeper vines. As well as creating an attractive landmark for the community, the building’s expansive greenery will act as a passive feature that will help to insulate the structure in winter and cool the interior spaces in the hot summer months. The international firm has proposed landing the green spaceship in the Villaverde district in southern Madrid. According to the architects, the library’s unique design was inspired by the desire to create a recognizable landmark in the community, a vibrant public space that will attract local visitors and forge a strong bond between residents and the neighborhood. Related: This canopy walkway elevates Shenzhen library-goers into the treetops The base of the two-story building will be comprised of a simple concrete and brick construction clad in a dark plaster. The first floor of the building will be completely transparent with floor-to-ceiling glass facades. This bottom floor will house the public areas, which will contain the ‘noisy’ functions. On the top floor will be the quiet zones, where visitors will be able to study and read. From the outside, this level will be completely covered in Virginia creeper vines planted on the roof of the building. Contained with red tubes and metallic netting, the lush greenery will look like it is floating above the street, giving the library a surreal, spaceship vibe. However, in addition to being eye-catching, the concept is also very practical and optimized for the city’s climate. Green walls and rooftops always add an extra level of insulation. In this case, the vines will help cool the interior spaces during the hot summer months by shading them from direct sunlight. Adding to the building’s abundance of green spaces, the structure will house several courtyard spaces that let in air and light into the interior spaces. At the eastern side of the building will be enough space to plant an urban vegetable garden . Attached to the youth library rooms, these gardens will be used to teach children about the benefits of healthy living. Through the community gardens, workshops and various activities, the library will have a strong connection to the neighborhood. + 3GATTI Architecture Studio Images via 3GATTI Architecture Studio

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Rammed concrete home in Portugal boasts passive design features and a green roof

March 26, 2019 by  
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Portuguese firm  Atelier 1111 has unveiled a gorgeous home designed to strategically blend into the rural region of Grândola in southern Portugal. The Cottage House is an angular design embedded into a small hillside, putting part of the home underneath the arid landscape. This technique provides the house with a strong thermal envelope, which — along with additional passive cooling strategies such as a green roof and thickened stone walls — boosts energy efficiency. Using the idyllic setting as inspiration for the design, the exterior of the home is clad in a rammed concrete, which gives the exterior a textured, neutral color that blends in with the arid soil. According to the architects, the rammed concrete was part of the structure’s many passive features, which also include a green roof and thick, insulative walls. Related: This breezy, green-roofed home in Singapore embraces nature from all angles “Thermal comfort was one of our biggest concerns, especially in the summer, because it is a region with high temperatures,” the architects explained. “We avoid mechanical systems, because we have a green roof and considerable thick walls.” Although angular in form, the contemporary home manages to subtly and respectfully blend in with its surroundings. Using the rolling topography to their advantage, the architects created a main open-air corridor that weaves through the structure, leading to the interior living space as well as various cutouts that frame the incredible views. Throughout the interior, the home’s walls and ceilings are also made out of concrete , but in a polished version. Locally-sourced marble was used for the flooring, and the design is enhanced with brass features on the interior doors. The Cottage House is actually part of a bigger plan that is set to be built on the same site, including a garage and a swimming pool. The design of the home, as well as the remaining buildings, was almost entirely inspired by the surrounding landscape, which is characterized by protected stone pine, olive and  cork  trees. The sloped land at its highest point provides a stunning view of the Atlantic Ocean. + Atelier 1111 Photography by Nuno Pinto via Atelier 1111

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Floating sky gardens and rooftop terraces join two halves of this tower in Taiwan

March 21, 2018 by  
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Aedas has unveiled plans for a soaring 656-foot tower that’s broken into two pieces held together by a series of ‘floating’ sky gardens and glass boxes. The architects drew inspiration from the Chinese character ‘?’ in the logo of the Taichung Commercial Bank. The 40-story high tower is a mixed-use development comprising the Taichung Commercial Bank Headquarters and an internationally-branded five-star hotel. Instead of stacking all the large functions such as the ballroom and swimming pool in a singular tower, the design creates two separate towers with a vertical void in the middle of the building. Related: Village-inspired office in Jakarta is topped with living trees and a green roof A series of transparent glass boxes house public exhibition space, sky gardens , a ballroom, a swimming pool, and conferencing facilities within the void. This plan enriches the building’s shape and creates a unique, iconic feature facing the main road. A terrace retreat at the rooftop features a restaurant and a VIP club long. Landscaped outdoor space and sweeping balconies provide magnificent city views for guests. Aedas’ design recently won the Tall Buildings category at MIPIM/The Architectural Review Future Project Awards 2018. + Aedas Via Archinect

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Floating sky gardens and rooftop terraces join two halves of this tower in Taiwan

Revamped NYC rooftop is brought to life with tinted resin panels

July 1, 2016 by  
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Evan C. Lai Landscape Design (ECLLD) designed this green rooftop above a gritty East Village townhouse in Manhattan. The 400sf space was maximized with an extensive green roof, neutral stone, and tinted resin panels. In the lounge the green resin transforms a skylight into a glow-in-the-dark daybed; in the foyer it casts a semi-translucent shade over an exterior shower and sauna; by the bar it adds a concentrated brushstroke across walls and benches. The design is topped off with a green roof above the sauna that improves insulation and water runoff. + Evan C. Lai Landscape Design The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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Dynamic residence in Singapore brings nature to the city with a green roof and vertical gardens

January 18, 2016 by  
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Buying Green & Good Intentions Won’t Even Slow Climate Change Down

September 9, 2011 by  
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Photo: Capitan Giona via Flickr/CC BY-SA And here comes an economist from the Environmental Defense Fund writing in the New York Times with a message that 95% of devoted “green” lifestyle-livers won’t want to hear: Your ethical consumer spending habits, your Prius-driving, your organic diet curation, your diligent efforts to dial down the A/C — none of that is making even a teeny tiny dent in addressing climate change or the biodivers… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Gorgeous Composting Shed Woven From Re-Bar By Groves-Raines Architects

August 1, 2011 by  
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Photos: Groves-Raines Architects Who said composting bins have to be unimaginative, boring boxes? Taking composting to fancier heights is Scottish architecture firm Groves-Raines Architects (GRA) , which designed this free-flowing composting and storage shed in Edinburgh. Made out of re-bar that’s woven into an undulating form, the structure is open on one end to allow access, and is topped with a green roof. It may be just a shed, but its innovative design has earned it some surprising accolades and awards, internationally a… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Ian MacDonald’s Meadow House Melts Into the Canadian Landscape

January 17, 2011 by  
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Situated one hour’s drive north of Toronto in a rolling pasture, Architect Ian MacDonald ‘s Meadow House is a kind of modernist extension of the land.

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Asia’s First Tidal Power Plant Coming to India

January 17, 2011 by  
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Wind and solar power may get the most attention in the realm of green energy, but tidal power is slowly edging its way in: Scotland , Korea , and even New York City all have tidal power projects currently underway. Most recently, India joined the tidal power wave with the approval of a commercial-scale tidal power plant in the Gulf of Kutch. The 50 Mw plant will be developed by the London-based company Atlantis Resources Corporation in partnership with Gujarat Power Corporation, and construction will start this year.

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