Australian father and son crowdfund $13 million for backyard Flow Hive honey harvester

September 19, 2016 by  
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Nearly 18 months ago, we reported on Flow Hive , the wildly successful crowdfunded project with two key benefits: making it easier to harvest honey in your backyard while simultaneously supporting threatened bee populations . The crowdfunding campaign broke numerous records , as it soared past $1 million in backing pledges on Day 1. The wild success of Flow Hive’s Indiegogo campaign made history—not just for bees and prospective beekeepers, but for all sorts of inventors and entrepreneurs looking for ways to fund their own innovations. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z54bL6kjyOI In total, the crowdfunding effort raised a whopping $13,244,379 for the Australian father-and-son team of Stuart and Cedar Anderson. That is 17,380 percent of the campaign’s original goal. The campaign was a raging success for many reasons. To start, the duo’s invention addresses a global problem and provides a hands-on solution that individual people or small communities can actually utilize (despite criticisms about Flow Hive’s plastic honeycomb). Additionally, the Andersons thoughtfully prepared photos, descriptions, and videos demonstrate how their prototype works. Related: 6 Buzz-worthy backyard beehive designs Those essential elements contributed to what happened next: the crowdfunding campaign went viral. The Flow Hive received widespread news coverage and tons of activity on social media. Because the campaign got so much attention, it quickly broke a number of crowdfunding records. Flow Hive became the fastest campaign to reach $1 million in backing (within the first 24 hours), the fastest to reach $2 million, and ultimately the most successful crowdfunding campaign ever launched outside the United States. By the end of this month, the project’s backers will have all received their very own Flow Hives, and the duo also sells them directly (for $699). While this particular project translates into a sweet life for bees and backyard honey fans, it’s also a great example of the awesome power that comes from combining a good idea, an entrepreneurial spirit, and an internet community full of bee lovers. Via CNET Images via Honey Flow

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Australian father and son crowdfund $13 million for backyard Flow Hive honey harvester

Curved cross laminated timber "Smile" installation in London is "stronger than concrete"

September 19, 2016 by  
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Photo by Guy Bell The timber utilized in The Smile is American tulipwood. Usually CLT is made of spruce , but engineering and design firm Arup is experimenting with tulipwood as it is stronger than spruce and affords a more elegant appearance. Tulipwood CLT is also sustainable , according the European Director of the American Hardwood Export Council David Venables, because it is abundant and because CLT utilizes low grade timber that’s not exported for furniture making anymore, therefore using more of what is harvested. Related: Rusty old ship transformed into a spectacular building filled with plants 12 tulipwood CLT panels comprise The Smile. Each is around 14 meters long and 4.5 meters wide, or around 46 feet long and 15 feet wide. Yet with a thickness of just 100 milimeters, or close to four inches, most of the floor and wall panels are quite thin. Oval holes in The Smile allow sunlight to permeate the space. Photo by Guy Bell The interactive installation is meant to draw the curious. Alison Brooks said in a statement, “The Smile’s form implies that it will rock. So the form itself is an invitation to test whether the pavilion moves, and how it feels to walk in on a curved floor. A single door and ramp from the square invites visitors to enter – something like our archetypal image of Noah’s Ark. Inside the door light spilling from the ends of the arc will invite you to walk up the slope of the curve to balconies at either end, rather like looking out from the rail of a ship.” The Smile was created out of a collaboration between the London Design Festival, Alison Brooks Architects, the American Hardwood Export Council, and Arup. It will be on display between September 17 and October 12, 2016 at the Chelsea College of Art Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground. + The Smile + Alison Brooks Architects + Arup + American Hardwood Export Council + London Design Festival Images courtesy of Guy Bell, Alison Brooks Architects, Arup, American Hardwood Export Council, and London Design Festival

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Curved cross laminated timber "Smile" installation in London is "stronger than concrete"

10 green structures featuring living walls

August 19, 2011 by  
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Deepika Sharma: A corridor lined with green walls A magnificent corridor lined with green walls. When we think of a living wall all sorts of images come to our mind, but in reality it is nothing more than a wall completely covered in vegetation. In order to create a living wall, fabric panels which have pre- vegetated plastic containers as well as irrigation systems are attached to the wall or supporting structure. The walls have a modular grid of wall panels, a soil or felt growing medium, an irrigation and nutrient -delivery system and a support structure. These are virtually universal features of a living wall. Some famous green structures featuring living walls are given below: 1 Musee du Quai Branly Paris The vertical garden walls which inhabits the walls of the Musee du Quai Branly in Paris are one of the best loved. This living wall is simply stunning. Not only do these types of vertical gardens improve the appearance of buildings, but they also improve air quality and lower energy consumption. 2. Sky Farm Toronto Skyfarm in Toronto, Canada is a massive 714 foot structure and a great example of how living walls can actually be profitable as well as beautiful. It is said that the crops grown on this agricultural space yields a high revenue. 3. CaixaForum Museum Madrid Another amazing living wall design is the CaixaForum Museum. Approximately 15,000 plants of 250 different species were used to cover its high wall. The combination of the old building with the vibrant and alive wall makes this a truly spectacular and memorable building. 4. Vancouver Aquarium Vancouver Here the living wall was created to act as a noise buffer from the city street and to prove that buildings and ecology can be integrated to enable cities to become greener. The wall is made up of thick modular panels making the installation of plants easier and more cost effective. 5. Marche des Halle Avignon This creation shows that not only are urban vertical gardens ecologically beneficial but they can also prove to be highly artist creations. It is designed in such a manner that no soil is required and the selected plants need less maintenance. 6. Qantas First Lounge Sydney International Airport Traveling can be stressful. Airports are busy, noisy places and waiting for a flight is very boring and frustrating. It’s not so, however, if you are to wait in the Qantas First Lounge in Sydney Airport. The living walls here are de-stressing. 7. Parabienta Japan This eco friendly living wall is the result of a collaboration of two Japanese companies. They are relatively inexpensive to create and maintain the living wall. It makes a significant contribution toward cooling the building, thereby helping to lower energy consumption. 8. Siam Paragon Shopping Center Bangkok This center would not look as interesting if its living walls were absent. These walls create a calm atmosphere and add color. The architecture looks absolutely stunning. It is a great example of how bringing gardens indoors can spruce up any interior. 9. Rica Talk Hotel Stockholm The restaurant in the Rica Talk Hotel was transformed into a botanical oasis by using living walls. To fill the large space, approximately 3000 plants from more than 100 different species were used. The effect is a cozy, natural environment which makes it a truly unique restaurant. 10. Oulu Bar and Eco-Lounge Williamsburg Cited as Brooklyn’s first living wall, this bar certainly attracts attention with its huge external living wall. The stunning vertical garden covers the entire front facade of the building and makes a beautiful contrast against the wooden door and window frame. The entire building looks designer proving that being green can be trendy.

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10 green structures featuring living walls

Micro-Architecture: An Eco-Hut That Would Turn Lincoln Himself Green

December 12, 2010 by  
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Images Courtesy of Yeta Here at TreeHugger, we love architecture and design that makes outdoor life more enjoyable, especially when it keeps things simple. And here’s a great example of exactly that, from Italian architect Flavio Galvagni and the firm Lab Zero : Yeta, the wooden micro-architectural structure that shows us just how far log cabins have come since the time of honest Abe…

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Micro-Architecture: An Eco-Hut That Would Turn Lincoln Himself Green

Charming Recycled iPad Sleeves and More Gift Ideas by Plaid Doctrine

December 12, 2010 by  
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Photo: Plaid Doctrine True to their name Plaid Doctrine has crafted the lovely tartan fabric–favored by Scotsman and Brooklyn hipsters alike–into a neat collection of iPad sleeves, briefcases, totebags and other great accessories . Made from domestically-sourced materials, including recycled fabrics and vegetable-tanned leather, the Washington-based brand manufactures all of their goods in the US of A. ..

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Charming Recycled iPad Sleeves and More Gift Ideas by Plaid Doctrine

Transformer Furniture: A Bookshelf Hides Table and Chairs

December 3, 2010 by  
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Photos via muuuz From Japanese designer Sakura Adachi comes this marvel of space-saving design: “Trick,” the bookshelf that hides a table and two chairs. Featured by Italian manufacturer Campeggi at the 2010 Salone del Mobile in Milan , this is a great example of how simple design can change common conceptions of everyday things, and save construction material as well as space. So grab a book and pull up a chair!..

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Transformer Furniture: A Bookshelf Hides Table and Chairs

Nestlé, Palm Oil and the Power of the Internet

March 18, 2010 by  
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Protesters in Orangutan suits and modified Kit Kat signs. In a great example of Gorilla marketing, Greenpeace in Europe appears to have been successful in persuading Nestlé to drop Indonesian palm oil producer Sinar Mas Group because of their “continued expansion into rain forests and “critical orangutan habitat.” The campaign focuses on Kit Kat, the most popular chocolate bar in Europe, and is a great example of how activists can succeed and how corporations can screw up bigtime. (Note: Nestlé does not make Kit Kat in the United States, it is licenced to Hershey) …

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Nestlé, Palm Oil and the Power of the Internet

Why Haven’t Electric Bikes Caught On?

March 18, 2010 by  
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Why Haven’t Electric Bikes Caught On?

Awesome Biomimicry: Leaf Veins Inspire New Model for Water and Electricity Distribution Networks

March 3, 2010 by  
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Lemon leaf with interconnected loops. Photo: RU A team of biophysicists at Rockefeller University recently published a paper in Physical Review Letters about a new way to design distribution networks based on the veins that carry water and nutrients in most tree leaves.

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Awesome Biomimicry: Leaf Veins Inspire New Model for Water and Electricity Distribution Networks

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