Solar-powered coastal home opens up to views of the Arabian Sea

July 14, 2020 by  
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Mumbai-based architecture firm Architecture BRIO has transformed a decrepit coastal property into a solar-powered luxury home with a strong connection to the outdoors. Because the property was originally cut off from views of and access to the coastline by a tall boundary wall, the architects raised the site by 5 feet with demolition material from the original structure as infill, thus minimizing landfill-bound waste . Palms, pines and other thick vegetation surround the new contemporary building that the architects have aptly named the House in a Beach Garden. <img src="//inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2020/07/House-in-a-Beach-Garden-Architecture-BRIO-2-889×592.jpg" alt="aerial view of elevated black home surrounded by lush palm trees" class="wp-image-2274888" Located in the coastal town of Alibaug, just south of Mumbai , the House in a Beach Garden was built above the existing foundation of the former structure, which was completely demolished. The new 320-square-meter, four-bedroom house comprises two floors and is oriented toward the west to face views of the sea. The ground floor, which is flanked by outdoor verandas on the east and west, houses the living room, dining room and kitchen. The staircase is located in a double-height skylit space at the heart of the home and leads up to the four bedrooms, one of which can be converted into a den. Related: A Mumbai industrial complex becomes a modern, mixed-use campus <img src="//inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2020/07/House-in-a-Beach-Garden-Architecture-BRIO-5-889×592.jpg" alt="black home with slatted screens over the top-floor windows" class="wp-image-2274891" <img src="//inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2020/07/House-in-a-Beach-Garden-Architecture-BRIO-7-889×592.jpg" alt="black staircase under a skylight" class="wp-image-2274893" An indoor/outdoor connection is emphasized throughout the house. In addition to the outdoor living areas that open up via glazed doors on the ground floor, glass sliding doors were installed in all bedrooms to open the interiors up to expansive views, from the sea and the beach on the west side to a palm orchard on the east. Aluminum sliding screens create a second skin around the upper floor to provide privacy and protection from the sun. <img src="//inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2020/07/House-in-a-Beach-Garden-Architecture-BRIO-6-889×649.jpg" alt="three hanging lights against a gray wall" class="wp-image-2274892" <img src="//inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2020/07/House-in-a-Beach-Garden-Architecture-BRIO-1-889×592.jpg" alt="aerial view of coastal home with solar panels on roof" class="wp-image-2274887" Next to the front garden, the architects have also placed a 20-meter-long swimming pool that points in the direction of the sea and is flanked by a row of palms. A solar photovoltaic array tops the home. + Architecture BRIO Photography by Edmund Sumner via Architecture BRIO

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Solar-powered coastal home opens up to views of the Arabian Sea

The endangered school shark is being sold as food in Australia

July 14, 2020 by  
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Last year, the International Union for Conservation of Nature ( IUCN ) listed the school shark as critically endangered. But that hasn’t stopped it from being regularly sold in Australian fish shops. While the international group chose one designation for the shark, Australian authorities put the species in a category known as “conservation dependent.” This means people can commercially trade the shark despite it being endangered. Related: Right Whales now ranked as critically endangered species “It’s a quirk in our national laws that prioritizes commercial exploitation and economic drivers over environmental ones,” said Leonardo Guida, a shark scientist and spokesperson for the Australian Marine Conservation Society, as reported in The Guardian . “We stopped harvesting whales for that very reason. Why is it different for a shark? Why is it different for a fish? There is no reason why any animal that has had a 90% decline in modern times should still continue to be harvested.” School sharks are smaller sharks that can measure up to 6 feet long and live for up to 60 years. This migratory species is found in many parts of the world, including off the shores of Brazil, Iceland, British Columbia, the U.K., Azores, Canary Islands and New Zealand. But they would be wise to steer clear of Australia , where their meat is sometimes sold as “flake,” Australia’s generic term for the shark meat popularly sold by fish and chip shops. The school shark is one of several animal species listed as conservation dependent that experts say should actually qualify for stronger protection. The school shark population has plummeted to 10% of its original numbers since 1990, when the species was officially declared as overfished. Countries recently voted to list the school shark on the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species (CMS) appendices. This international agreement tries to get countries to cooperate in conserving migratory species. Australia was the only country to vote against it, claiming that the school shark population found in the ocean around Australia doesn’t migrate. Via The Guardian Image via Queensland State Archives

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The endangered school shark is being sold as food in Australia

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