Australian father and son crowdfund $13 million for backyard Flow Hive honey harvester

September 19, 2016 by  
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Nearly 18 months ago, we reported on Flow Hive , the wildly successful crowdfunded project with two key benefits: making it easier to harvest honey in your backyard while simultaneously supporting threatened bee populations . The crowdfunding campaign broke numerous records , as it soared past $1 million in backing pledges on Day 1. The wild success of Flow Hive’s Indiegogo campaign made history—not just for bees and prospective beekeepers, but for all sorts of inventors and entrepreneurs looking for ways to fund their own innovations. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z54bL6kjyOI In total, the crowdfunding effort raised a whopping $13,244,379 for the Australian father-and-son team of Stuart and Cedar Anderson. That is 17,380 percent of the campaign’s original goal. The campaign was a raging success for many reasons. To start, the duo’s invention addresses a global problem and provides a hands-on solution that individual people or small communities can actually utilize (despite criticisms about Flow Hive’s plastic honeycomb). Additionally, the Andersons thoughtfully prepared photos, descriptions, and videos demonstrate how their prototype works. Related: 6 Buzz-worthy backyard beehive designs Those essential elements contributed to what happened next: the crowdfunding campaign went viral. The Flow Hive received widespread news coverage and tons of activity on social media. Because the campaign got so much attention, it quickly broke a number of crowdfunding records. Flow Hive became the fastest campaign to reach $1 million in backing (within the first 24 hours), the fastest to reach $2 million, and ultimately the most successful crowdfunding campaign ever launched outside the United States. By the end of this month, the project’s backers will have all received their very own Flow Hives, and the duo also sells them directly (for $699). While this particular project translates into a sweet life for bees and backyard honey fans, it’s also a great example of the awesome power that comes from combining a good idea, an entrepreneurial spirit, and an internet community full of bee lovers. Via CNET Images via Honey Flow

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Australian father and son crowdfund $13 million for backyard Flow Hive honey harvester

Curved cross laminated timber "Smile" installation in London is "stronger than concrete"

September 19, 2016 by  
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Photo by Guy Bell The timber utilized in The Smile is American tulipwood. Usually CLT is made of spruce , but engineering and design firm Arup is experimenting with tulipwood as it is stronger than spruce and affords a more elegant appearance. Tulipwood CLT is also sustainable , according the European Director of the American Hardwood Export Council David Venables, because it is abundant and because CLT utilizes low grade timber that’s not exported for furniture making anymore, therefore using more of what is harvested. Related: Rusty old ship transformed into a spectacular building filled with plants 12 tulipwood CLT panels comprise The Smile. Each is around 14 meters long and 4.5 meters wide, or around 46 feet long and 15 feet wide. Yet with a thickness of just 100 milimeters, or close to four inches, most of the floor and wall panels are quite thin. Oval holes in The Smile allow sunlight to permeate the space. Photo by Guy Bell The interactive installation is meant to draw the curious. Alison Brooks said in a statement, “The Smile’s form implies that it will rock. So the form itself is an invitation to test whether the pavilion moves, and how it feels to walk in on a curved floor. A single door and ramp from the square invites visitors to enter – something like our archetypal image of Noah’s Ark. Inside the door light spilling from the ends of the arc will invite you to walk up the slope of the curve to balconies at either end, rather like looking out from the rail of a ship.” The Smile was created out of a collaboration between the London Design Festival, Alison Brooks Architects, the American Hardwood Export Council, and Arup. It will be on display between September 17 and October 12, 2016 at the Chelsea College of Art Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground. + The Smile + Alison Brooks Architects + Arup + American Hardwood Export Council + London Design Festival Images courtesy of Guy Bell, Alison Brooks Architects, Arup, American Hardwood Export Council, and London Design Festival

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Curved cross laminated timber "Smile" installation in London is "stronger than concrete"

Why Your Makeup Bag May Need a Makeover

December 23, 2013 by  
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Just like you wouldn’t let old food sit in the refrigerator long past the expiration date, it’s also a good idea to throw out old cosmetics after a certain point.

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Why Your Makeup Bag May Need a Makeover

Old Clothes Find New Life as Animal Characters

December 23, 2013 by  
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A New York production designer finds inspiration from old fabrics to create meaningful animal characters.

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Old Clothes Find New Life as Animal Characters

How Dow taps benefits from trickling money into water funds

November 22, 2013 by  
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Watershed conservation isn't just a good idea. Here's why it's a bargain for businesses who invest in it. 

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How Dow taps benefits from trickling money into water funds

When it comes to printing, it ain’t easy buying green

July 10, 2012 by  
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Printing environmentally responsibly is a good idea … on paper. Then reality sets in.

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When it comes to printing, it ain’t easy buying green

EDF Climate Corps names 2012 members: Facebook, Boeing, AT&T and more

May 22, 2012 by  
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The EDF Climate Corps started five years ago as a good idea, and now has fellows working in scores of corporations.  

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EDF Climate Corps names 2012 members: Facebook, Boeing, AT&T and more

Ecolabeling and the power of uncommon collaborations

May 22, 2012 by  
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There is a growing body of evidence showing that sustainability certification is spawning far-reaching changes in production and land use practices, supply chains and in the way businesses operate.

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Ecolabeling and the power of uncommon collaborations

Cycling Across Scandinavia: Rudolf Steiner Found, Thanks to James Turell

August 10, 2011 by  
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Counting the number of bikes on the bike path in Boras, Sweden. Guest poster Robert Ouellette has written for the National Post, Corporate Knights and his own Reading Toronto. He is cycling across Sweden and reports: Leaving Boras takes us past a digital sign that counts and displays the number of cyclists using the adjacent bike lane. It is a good idea. I’d like to see guerilla versions put on Canadian streets. We need to make visible the growing number of cyclists our politicians are eager to ignore… anyone want to take me up on this? Mobile automated bike counters have to be easy to make and use . . . … Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Cycling Across Scandinavia: Rudolf Steiner Found, Thanks to James Turell

Scientists, Lawmakers Object To DoE Fracking Panel Members’ Industry Ties

August 10, 2011 by  
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photo: André-Pierre du Plessis / CC BY As the Department of Energy is expected to release tomorrow its draft recommendations on the safety and environmental impacts of fracking , both scientists and lawmakers have sent letters to DoE expressing concern about the panel’s members. Six of the seven people on the panel have current financial ties to the natural gas industry…. Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Scientists, Lawmakers Object To DoE Fracking Panel Members’ Industry Ties

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