3D-printed vegan steak could aid world hunger relief efforts

December 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on 3D-printed vegan steak could aid world hunger relief efforts

3D-printed food has arrived. With options coming to the marketplace from a variety of companies, those high-capacity printers from a few years ago that took eight hours to produce a small, basic shape have evolved into a viable, mass-produced food option. Giuseppe Scionti, Italian bioengineer with a PhD in biomedicine, has further advanced printed technology with the invention of a plant-based meat substitute. With this innovation in hand, he created Novameat, a company intent on commercialization of the product to make it available in all markets. Related: Elzelinde van Doleweerd transforms food waste into beautiful, 3D-printed snacks With plenty of meat substitutes on the market, Novameat focuses on texture. Where others have made a chicken nugget or hamburger patty alternative, Scionti has taken it a step further with tissue engineering and bioprinting to create the fibrous texture associated with steak and other meats. In addition to offering the chewy characteristic of meat, Novameat contains the same levels of protein, amino acids, vitamins and minerals contained in red meat but stems entirely from natural, plant-based ingredients. These ingredients are formulated into a paste, which is fed through the printer to create the end product. The inspiration of Novameat is two-fold. Firstly, Scionti is concerned about the sustainability of the planet. With the newest research pointing fingers at the cattle industry, it’s relatively undisputed that the water and land consumption to support livestock production is resource-prohibitive. In short, Scionti believes that the earth needs an alternative to traditional beef products. Secondly, Giuseppe believes that 3D-printed meat substitutes can go a long way in the efforts to curb world-hunger and food-supply shortages. Novameat can be sterilized and packaged for long transports and does not require refrigeration, making it a food supply option for the deepest corners of the planet. One particularly sci-fi component of this technology is the potential to inject the food with medicines needed to treat endemic disease in those remote locations. The technology not only provides the opportunity to emulate steak, but other foods as well, such as chicken. In addition, the process is scalable, reaching production of 200 grams of meat an hour at a cost of 4 euros. + Novameat Via Dezeen Images via Novameat

See original here:
3D-printed vegan steak could aid world hunger relief efforts

Large scale 3D Printer capable of printing a motorcycle

December 17, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Large scale 3D Printer capable of printing a motorcycle

Just a few years ago, 3D printing capability was relatively new technology. A home 3D printer could perhaps create a single printed letter or figure if left to work overnight. Advancements in the industry have been fast and furious with new technology offering recognizably sci-fi-like options. While companies have made news with efforts to print homes for a solution to housing shortages or printed skin in the name of medical advancement, one company has created a prototype that proves transportation could be the next evolution of 3D printing. Created thanks to the advanced technology of a high-capacity printer, the NERA 3D-printed motorcycle prototype is the first fully functional model of its kind. NOWlab, the innovation department at BigRep, is the creative force behind the design. Based out of Germany, the company is putting tracks down as the world’s leader in large-scale 3D printers. Related: The world’s first 3D-printed steel bridge looks like it came from another planet The NERA was manufactured to show the potential of these printers. Note that the motorcycle is a prototype only and not for sale to the public. However, there is much to be learned from the prototype itself and it leans towards limitless potential in the industry. Components of the NERA are almost hard to comprehend when you realize that it all came out of a printer, far from the traditional production line of Yamaha or Harley Davidson. Literally from the ground up, this motorcycle has all non-electrical printed parts, 15 in all, that include tires, rim, frame, fork and seat. Not only are the parts printed, but they are stylistic and performance-based. For example, the airless tires with customized tread offer a design of strength and support. The rims are lightweight but durable, providing a smooth ride. Eight pivot joints provide forkless steering for easy maneuverability. Another unique engineering development is the lack of suspension, replaced by flexible bumpers. The Nera (N)ew (ERA) is powered by an electric engine, fitted into a customizable case. Related: This portable 3D skin printer can heal deep wounds in minutes We wouldn’t expect the company to stop driving innovation forward at any point soon with a focus on potential future uses of large-scale 3D printer capacity. “These exciting prototypes not only demonstrate the unprecedented capacity of FFF large-scale 3D printing technology in Additive Manufacturing,” said Stephan Beyer, PhD, CEO of BigRep GmbH. “They also emphasize our unique ability as the market’s innovation and thought leader to bring cutting-edge technologies from design to reality, providing an added-value market lead for our industrial customers.” + BigRep Gmb Images via BigRep GmbH

More:
Large scale 3D Printer capable of printing a motorcycle

Progress update from Bob Bennett, CIO of Kansas City, on its bold smart city initiative

November 5, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Progress update from Bob Bennett, CIO of Kansas City, on its bold smart city initiative

Bob Bennet, the chief innovation officer of the city of Kansas City, embarked on the ambitious project to “smarten” up Kansas City a few years ago, and he came to VERGE to discuss it then. He came back this year to provide a status report on the project: the city has officially launched technology aimed at engaging citizens on issues, initiatives and action.

Read more here:
Progress update from Bob Bennett, CIO of Kansas City, on its bold smart city initiative

Emerging leaders and VERGE impact fellows

November 5, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Emerging leaders and VERGE impact fellows

Originally posted here:
Emerging leaders and VERGE impact fellows

BMW confirms the i4 electric sedan will arrive by 2025

March 9, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on BMW confirms the i4 electric sedan will arrive by 2025

Ever since the i3 and i8 were released in 2014, we’ve been wondering what BMW’s next model would be for its electric i sub-brand. Now the automaker has confirmed it will introduce a new electric sedan — the i4 — by 2025. And it will be one of 25 new electrified vehicles they will launch by 2025. Even though 2025 is still a few years away, we’ve already seen a preview of the BMW i4, which will take inspiration from the i Vision Dynamics concept that made its debut last year. It is an aggressively styled sedan that’s about the same size as BMW’s popular 3 Series. If the i4 stays within that size range, it will be a direct rival to the Tesla Model 3. Related: BMW’s new wireless pad recharges EV batteries like a Sonicare toothbrush BMW hasn’t revealed any specs for the i4, but the i Vision Dynamics concept has a driving range of 373 miles. It can also reach 62 mph in a quick four seconds on its way to a top speed over 120 mph. Can you say power? BMW has already confirmed that a new MINI electric car and an electrified version of the X3 SUV, called the iX3 will arrive before the i4, so there’s still plenty to look forward to. + BMW All images © BMW

Original post: 
BMW confirms the i4 electric sedan will arrive by 2025

Mercedes-Benz just unveiled the world’s first all-electric big rig truck

July 29, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Mercedes-Benz just unveiled the world’s first all-electric big rig truck

Imagine a future where big rig trucks slide quietly down the road, powered by electricity . Tesla has been working for years to make this vision happen – but this week, Mercedes-Benz beat them to the punch. The Urban eTruck is the world’s first fully electric big rig – and it’s quiet, powerful, and has an admissible total weight of around 29 tons. The Mercedes-Benz Urban eTruck can only travel up to 124 miles, so it wouldn’t be ideal for the long treks truckers often make to transport goods. Instead, Daimler designed the eTruck for city transportation. A fleet of emissions-free electric trucks could significantly reduce the air pollution many cities battle. Related: This tiny shape-shifting sideways-driving car could mark the end of parallel parking The company hopes to start producing the eTruck around the “beginning of the next decade.” By that time, they hope technology and battery advances will make the eTruck even more efficient and cost-effective. Daimler board member Dr. Wolfgang Bernhard said in a press release, “Electric drive systems previously only saw extremely limited use in trucks. Nowadays costs, performance, and charging times develop further so rapidly that now there is a trend reversal in the distribution sector: the time is ripe for the electric truck.” Daimler’s Fuso Canter E-Cell “light-duty trucks” have undergone tests for a few years now. In Portugal, successful fleet trials saw the light trucks drive just over 31,000 miles in a year. According to the company, the light trucks “reduced CO2 emissions by 37 percent compared to diesel engines.” Just about a week ago, Elon Musk revealed in a blog post that his company is also working on a Tesla Semi , which they plan to unveil in 2017. Now it’s a race to see who will start producing their electric big rig first. + Mercedes-Benz Via Engadget Images via Daimler

See more here:
Mercedes-Benz just unveiled the world’s first all-electric big rig truck

E-Waste Exposé: What Happens To Electronics After Use?

February 25, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Eco Tech

Comments Off on E-Waste Exposé: What Happens To Electronics After Use?

I was elated a few years ago when I discovered that my town had an electronics recycling drop off point. I was filled with smug satisfaction as I dropped off an ancient computer and a VCR I hadn’t used in almost a decade. I remember driving away…

Here is the original:
E-Waste Exposé: What Happens To Electronics After Use?

Download These 20+ Unique E-Waste Upcycling Ideas

February 15, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Download These 20+ Unique E-Waste Upcycling Ideas

In an age where technology seems to move at the speed of light, electronic devices often become e-waste in only a few years after manufacture.  Download this fact – according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the United States generated…

View original here:
Download These 20+ Unique E-Waste Upcycling Ideas

New ice-melting concrete offers electrifying alternative to road salt

January 26, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on New ice-melting concrete offers electrifying alternative to road salt

Move over, road salt . There’s a new ice-melting technology up ahead, and it could prove safer for humans—and the environment—than the troublesome salt crystals used in most snowy regions. For the past several years, researchers have been working to develop a way for roads to de-ice themselves using a low-voltage electric charge built into the roadway. One such approach is gaining traction, and could become part of U.S. roads in just a few years. Read the rest of New ice-melting concrete offers electrifying alternative to road salt

View original post here: 
New ice-melting concrete offers electrifying alternative to road salt

Re Rag Rug turns “worthless” materials into beautiful handmade rugs

January 26, 2016 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Re Rag Rug turns “worthless” materials into beautiful handmade rugs

All material is good material, if you find the right use for it. Studio Brieditis & Evans challenges our notion of waste in Re Rag Rug, a design project that brings new life to materials considered worthless by the textile industry. The premise of the project is simple: one month, one technique, one rug. Over the course of 12 months, the designers created 12 unique rugs, all made without using a loom and crafted from excess fabric remnants . The 12 prototypes are currently being exhibited at Institut Suédois in Paris, France, until April 10, 2016. You can read more about their rug-making process on their blog . + Studio Brieditis & Evans The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

More here: 
Re Rag Rug turns “worthless” materials into beautiful handmade rugs

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1239 access attempts in the last 7 days.