Is your data center ready for Eco Mode?

February 1, 2013 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Is your data center ready for Eco Mode?

Companies need to know a few things about their equipment and power to use energy efficient Eco Mode more effectively.

The rest is here:
Is your data center ready for Eco Mode?

3 steps to intelligent site selection

February 1, 2013 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on 3 steps to intelligent site selection

How companies can choose sites that make both business and environmental sense.

See original here:
3 steps to intelligent site selection

How can I reuse or recycle an acrylic sweater/jumper?

March 5, 2012 by  
Filed under Recycle

Comments Off on How can I reuse or recycle an acrylic sweater/jumper?

We’ve covered wool jumpers/sweaters on the site before now – what to do with them when you accidentally shrink your most favourite jumper ever in the wash . But what about acrylic jumpers? They don’t get ruined in the same way but cheaper ones tend to lose their shape and look a bit washed out over time. That’s the position I’m in now with a few things from before I brought in my “at least 50% natural fibres” rule (in practise, it’s usually a minimum of 80%) – they’re approaching the end of their wearable life even by someone as scruffy as me. Since they can’t be felted (either accidentally or on purpose), they can’t be used for a lot of the same reuses as wool jumpers – they’re too thin (and anyway, not heat resistant enough) to be turned into a pot holder or something like that, and I don’t think they’d be absorbent enough to be used to make a soakers/nappy covers for babies. If they were prettier jumpers & cardigans (rather than just boring one colour ones), I could use the less washed out ones to make a cushion cover – I love the stripes and matching stripy draught excluder in that tutorial and actually, that’s another idea – I could use the arms to make a draught excluder, stuffed with the shredded material from the body. But what else could I do with them? Have you reused, recycled or upcycled acrylic jumpers in any interesting, practical or fun ways?

Read the rest here:
How can I reuse or recycle an acrylic sweater/jumper?

What green product do you wish someone would invent?

February 28, 2012 by  
Filed under Business, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on What green product do you wish someone would invent?

We’ve had an email from Mel asking for a bit of help with a university assignment about green things and I thought it might make an interesting discussion: I have a uni assignment where I need to market an ‘imaginary’ green product – I believe my time would be better spent marketing an ‘actual’ green product – but that is unfortunately not the brief!! Each product I have thought of seems to already exist when I do an Internet search … so I though I might pose the question to you all … ‘What green product do you wish someone would invent?’. I’d love to hear your suggestions and hopefully find a subject for my assignment. It can be as simple or wacky as you like – it does not have to be based on actual science since it is for a marketing subject – but I would prefer to spend my energies on something useful and thoughtful. Thanks! Great site, by the way 🙂 We greenies tend to be pretty resourceful at making our own green versions of things we need if we can’t buy them already (either because they don’t exist or because they’re too expensive) but there must be some things we’re still clamoring for. Plus, I suspect someone of us might be wishing for things that already exist – and hopefully by expressing our wishes we can find out about them! My only ideas are business-to-business ones such as genuinely green food packaging for shops & supermarkets to use — yes, we can take our own containers to some places and reduce the amount of packaged stuff we buy in the first place, but it would be good if supermarkets had more affordable-to-them, greener options as an alternative to formed plastic or vacuum-sealed plastic containers. Or, more of a service than a product but a way for more packaging to be returned & reused like milk bottles or pop bottles in ye olden days. One of my other “why can’t you get…?” pet peeves is the amount of times we’re transporting water around unnecessarily in products that could be made more concentrated or in a dehydrated form — but all the examples I can think of right now are available, for example powdered milk and shampoo bars. Do you have any “why isn’t there a green version of that?” items?

Original post: 
What green product do you wish someone would invent?

How can I revamp some plain curtains with recycled/upcycled materials?

February 23, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Recycle

Comments Off on How can I revamp some plain curtains with recycled/upcycled materials?

Following on from my recent “ how can I revamp a kitchen so I don’t need a new one? ” question, Janet has asked a similar (smaller scale!) question about curtains: I have ordinary plain curtains that need to look snazzy. I like the “wacky” type of design,whether it’s adding on old buttons,bits of fabric etc. Any ideas? Many thanks,Janet. I think you’ve already got a few good ideas on there: cover the bottom quarter/third of the curtains with a strip of contrasting fabric and decorate the join with a row of buttons (mmm, buttons on curtains ) – or go shabby chic with a whole row/section of buttons and misc (badges, charms, pompoms, bows, rosettes – whatever you can find). Or use scraps of old fabric and yarn to make a bunting design higher up – old patterned clothes or bedding would be fab. I’ve seen curtains that looked like they had tufts/short tassels of yarn every 15cm/6ins or so in lines down the length of them, which would be easy to replicate. Or sew on ribbon /thin strips of scrap fabric to add stripes or wiggly lines – for thicker stripes, this chevron idea is nice and I’ve seen a similar appliqué idea using strips of a design cut from old lacey net curtain . Alternatively, you could make reverse appliqué patches – cut out simple shapes and add a contrasting shape/fabric behind to peek through ( reverse appliqué tutorial ). A simple no-sew idea is to attach ribbon/yarn/strips of scrap fabric to each curtain ring/clip – like the idea (about a third of the way down) on this page . If the curtains are 100% cotton, you could try dyeing them – ombre/dip dye ones would look interesting (as if all the dye from the curtains had slid down to the floor 😉 ) – or if they’re too dark for that, selectively bleaching them. (Obviously do try a test patch first.) If they’re too big to be manageable in a dye bath, you could try printing onto them instead (possibly using a linocut technique or an even simpler stamp for something like polka dots — or for a fun or kid-centric room, hand prints 😉 ). How would you revamp or embellished plain curtains using recycled/upcycled stuff? What did you do? Have you got any tips or suggestions for Janet? Any non-sewing idea or ones that use alternative materials to fabric/yarn?

More:
How can I revamp some plain curtains with recycled/upcycled materials?

Reduce This: How can I revamp an old kitchen so I don’t need to buy a new one?

February 10, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Reduce This: How can I revamp an old kitchen so I don’t need to buy a new one?

Yesterday, I posted a question from James, asking for ways to reuse or recycle a whole kitchen , because he’s getting a new one. Thanks to everyone that has commented about that! At the bottom, I mentioned reducing is the most important part of the recycling triangle. James already seems quite set on getting a new kitchen but other people approaching a similar “new kitchen?” position may want to revamp what’s there rather than starting again. By “other people”, I mean me 😉 Our kitchen is also 15+ years old, is looking rather tired (especially as half the kitchen has one cupboard design, the other half a different one) and the far end is generally pretty dark (as is obvious in the picture!). We did a few things to freshen it up when we moved here two and a half years ago such as repainting the walls a more neutral shade and replacing the very scuffed, dark green hob & sink with lighter alternatives (thanks eBay for second-hand bargains for both!). More recently (as this week – it’s still drying), we’ve had the nasty grease-attracting spiky artex ceiling reskimmed so once painted, that’ll look fresher and as well as redecorating again, we’re going to add some tiled splashbacks (since there aren’t any at the moment – mucky walls a go go!). We’re hoping to find a replacement for the badly fitted dark vinyl flooring too and improve the lighting somewhat. Will it be as nice as a new kitchen? No — but it’ll hopefully be good enough and more practical so we won’t need to decorate again for a good while (I hate decorating). I don’t think I have the skill or space to do an adequate job of repainting the cupboards (which would make the mismatched doors more uniform) but I’m hoping everything else will freshen it up enough. Have you revamped an old kitchen to save replacing it? Do you have any tips or suggestions? Did you include any reclaimed, recycled or upcycled elements in your “new” kitchen? I’d love to hear your stories for inspiration!

View post:
Reduce This: How can I revamp an old kitchen so I don’t need to buy a new one?

Impact of advertising on Recycle This – and my promises to you

December 12, 2011 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Impact of advertising on Recycle This – and my promises to you

Recycle This turns six in April 2012 and from day one, it has included advertising. I started the site when I was in the process of quitting my job for a “career break”, which turned into self-employment. The idea was that I’d have advertising on the site for as long as I needed the money from it. In the first couple of years, it wasn’t much at all but every little helped. Now after other ventures sadly tanked, I still need the (meagre) advertising revenue to supplement my (even more meagre) income. But I don’t think it has impacted the nature of Recycle This that much. Yes, I spend time tweaking text to trying to bring more visitors to the site but not at the cost of readability (the lack of readability is usually to do with my tendency to waffle and/or put extra comments in brackets, you know, like this 😉 ). I try to ensure pages are linked to other relevant pages to keep people interested – but I never split articles over many different pages to force people to click through after every paragraph to drive up ad impressions*. And I publish the full text of the article in the RSS feed (and email feed) so if you subscribe to either of those, you never have to visit the site and see adverts (unless you want to see comments, although you can subscribe to the RSS feed of comments too, if you’re interested). Yes, I need to generate some money but not at the cost of producing a worthwhile site or engaging in habits I find infuriating when I see them elsewhere . When I do link posts (such as Christmas craft round-ups ), I get ideas from a range of sources — reading the people’s blogs directly, via other curating blogs, through requests for suggestions on Twitter, Pinterest and from stuff people have emailed me — but no one ever pays (either directly or indirectly through products or links back) to be included in those, and I would never ask them to. I only feature stuff that I personally like/want to make or think are worthwhile – info that I generally want to pass on to as many people as possible. Ditto anything used for giveaways . As for the actual adverts, I can quite confidently say that I have never changed any editorial content on the site because an advertiser wants me to. My main advertising network for most of the past six years has been Google Adsense. I have tried other networks, affiliate schemes and had some direct advertising but I’ve mostly stuck with Google’s context sensitive ads because in general they are more relevant in terms of both subject and geography. The downside is that I don’t control exactly which adverts appear on the site – the upside of that though is that I’m never under any conscious or unconscious pressure to bend my subject to not offend an advertiser — I don’t know who they are. The only concessions I make under the Adsense program is not swearing every other *&%ing word or displaying hate speech/pornography on the site – which, to be frank, isn’t exactly something I was planning to do anyway 😉 Anyway, long story short, I want to make six promises – six things I’ve stuck to over the last six years and hope to stick to for as long as the site exists in the future: I will not change anything I’ve written or anything anyone has written in a comment because an advertiser wants me to I will not post any “sponsored posts”, any (unpaid) guest posts or product reviews that are simply adverts in disguise I will not post accept any direct advertising in any form that promotes products that generate, rather than reduce, waste I will not post any adverts in our site’s Twitter feed (or any other social media platforms that might crop up in the future!) I will not put money generation above creating a useful site to help people reduce, reuse, recycle more I will remove all advertising from the site as soon as I can do without the money Sorry this has been a bit of a departure from the normal How can I recycle this…? posts , I just wanted to get a few things off my chest! Normal programming will resume tomorrow 🙂 -louisa 🙂 * The only exception to this is adding a “read more” link so really long articles don’t display in their entirety on the front page. Anyone visiting the article directly will see it all on one page, and people would have to click off the main page to read comments anyway.

Excerpt from:
Impact of advertising on Recycle This – and my promises to you

Another View of Why You’re Fat

March 16, 2010 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Another View of Why You’re Fat

Stephen McDaniel at Freakalytics After I posted about the inverse correlation between between subsidies and federal nutrition guidelines I learned a few things about statistics and the power of the internet. I didn’t really understand commenter Sam’s suggestion that the “chart-oon is a good example of terrible info-graphics gutting information of its power” until I followed his link and found the above graphs amongst a number of other submissions prompte…

Go here to see the original: 
Another View of Why You’re Fat

CO2 Concentration in Atmosphere Reaches New Highs in 2010

March 16, 2010 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on CO2 Concentration in Atmosphere Reaches New Highs in 2010

Photo via Free Photo Well, that didn’t take long. After global emissions stalled following the worldwide recession around 2008– even falling in some otherwise heavily polluting nations like the US of A–it looks like everyone can rest assured: we’re back on track with CO2 concentrations steadily a-risin’ in the atmosphere. …

Here is the original:
CO2 Concentration in Atmosphere Reaches New Highs in 2010

Is California’s New $5,000 Electric Car Rebate a Good Idea?

March 16, 2010 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Is California’s New $5,000 Electric Car Rebate a Good Idea?

511 Contra Costa Normally, we’d be 100% behind incentives designed to spur the development of cleaner technologies, and to help consumers make cleaner, more conscious buying decisions. Which is why, on the face of it, California’s $5,000 rebate for the purchase of a number of electric vehicles, seems like a good idea. But the structure, and the rollout of the program leaves something to be desired.

Here is the original:
Is California’s New $5,000 Electric Car Rebate a Good Idea?

Bad Behavior has blocked 21475 access attempts in the last 7 days.