The Ocean Cleanup is about to send a giant plastic collector to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

April 20, 2018 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on The Ocean Cleanup is about to send a giant plastic collector to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

The  Great Pacific Garbage Patch is growing at an alarming rate — and it’s already three times the size of France . Fortunately, help is on the way: new images show that The Ocean Cleanup  is building an innovative  plastic -scooping system in Alameda, CA, and they’re planning to launch it as early as this summer. There are around 1.8 trillion pieces of plastic junk in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, and The Ocean Cleanup , started by now-23-year-old Boyan Slat , is much closer to deploying its technology to tackle the dilemma. The group’s  Road to the Cleanup timeline reveals that, earlier this month, the crew finished “the first weld of two floater sections” — the official start of the assembly process. Days later, the organization shared another image of what they called great progress. Related: The Ocean Cleanup launches San Francisco base in Pacific trash-busting bid Fast Company reported  that a massive floating tube, around 2,000 feet long, will serve as a U-shaped barrier to help trap plastic. It’s flexible enough to bend with ocean waves and is made of HDPE plastic — the same material that the system aims to collect, according to ABC7 News . A nylon screen attached to the tube will catch plastic beneath the waves — but not fish, as it isn’t a net. Big anchors, a concept unveiled by Slat in a presentation last year , will essentially tether the system not to the seabed, but to a deep water layer. When might we be able to see the system in action? The Road to the Cleanup timeline estimates launch will happen in the middle of this year. The first piece of the system, which is about as long as a football field, will be towed out into the ocean for tests in a few weeks. The piece will be connected to the larger system following the local tow test, and a final test 200 miles offshore will occur after assembly is finished. It will take three weeks for the system to reach the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, and The Ocean Cleanup could get there in August if everything goes as planned. Plastic they gather could be transformed into various  products — clothing, for example — and the Ocean Cleanup could have a shipment of plastic in late fall. + The Ocean Cleanup + Road to the Cleanup Via Fast Company and ABC7 News Images via The Ocean Cleanup

Go here to read the rest: 
The Ocean Cleanup is about to send a giant plastic collector to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

This new 3D-printed house was built by a portable robot in just 48 hours

April 20, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on This new 3D-printed house was built by a portable robot in just 48 hours

There are a lot of 3D-printed houses popping up these days, but this is the first time an architect with the renown of Massimiliano Locatelli of CLS Architetti and Arup has tackled one. Built out of a special quick-drying mortar, the 1,076-square-foot house was constructed in just 48 hours. Locatelli envisions 3D printing as the housing of the future – and that his house could be constructed anywhere,”even the moon.” The project, 3D Housing 05 , was built on-site by a portable robot as a way of showing how 3D-printing can reduce construction waste but still create a beautiful space. The house is the first of its kind, because it is 3D-printed, but can be deconstructed and reassembled somewhere else. Like you’d expect from such respected names in architecture, the house is quite stylish. A one-story home with curved walls and four separate spaces built out of 35 modules, the house embraces its 3D-printed roots, with the printing texture adding warmth to the concrete space. The architects used a  Cybe mobile 3D concrete printer and a specific mortar called CyBe MORTAR. The material sets in five minutes, with a dehydration time of 24 hours – compared to the 28 days for traditional concrete. Related: New 3D-printed house can be built in less than a day for just $4,000 “My vision was to integrate new, more organic shapes in the surrounding landscapes or urban architecture…. The challenges are the project’s five key values: creativity, sustainability, flexibility, affordability and rapidity. The opportunity is to be a protagonist of a new revolution in architecture,” Locatelli told Wallpaper* . Arup and CLS Architetti revealed the design at the Salone del Mobile festival in the grand Piazza Cesare Beccaria. + 3D Printed Housing 05 + Arup + CLS Architetti via Treehugger

Originally posted here:
This new 3D-printed house was built by a portable robot in just 48 hours

Apple’s new recycling robot can disassemble 200 iPhones in a single hour

April 20, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Apple’s new recycling robot can disassemble 200 iPhones in a single hour

Just in time for Earth Day , Apple has unveiled a new recycling robot — and it can disassemble 200 iPhones in a single hour. Daisy can successfully extract parts from nine types of iPhones — and for every 100,000 devices it can salvage 1,900 kg of aluminum, 770 kg of cobalt, 710 kg of copper and 11 kg of rare earth elements. The robot represents a major step forward in Apple ’s mission to someday build its devices entirely from recycled materials. “We created Daisy to have a smaller footprint and the capability to disassemble multiple models of iPhones with higher variation compared to Liam ” — an earlier iteration of the company’s recycling robotics — Apple said in its 2018 Environmental Responsibility Report . Ultimately, Apple hopes to develop a closed-loop production system in which every reusable part of older devices is utilized in new ones. “To meet our goal, we must use 100 percent, responsibly sourced, recycled or renewable materials and ensure the equivalent amount is returned to market,” Apple said in its report. “Recognizing that this goal could take many years to reach, we remain committed to responsible sourcing of primary materials as we make the transition.” Though Apple has yet to release a timeline for its full transition, it has started active projects to recycle rare earth metals , paper products and more common metals from its supply chain. Related: Apple is now “globally powered by 100% renewable energy” Apple plans to add Daisy robots to several locations throughout the United States and Europe. Because the company is currently only able to incorporate used devices that it receives directly, Apple will emphasize its GiveBack program, in part by offering company credit for returned devices. Thanks to its recycling initiatives, Apple has already reduced its primary aluminum consumption by 23 to 25 percent since 2015. Despite the company’s initial success, some observers have advocated for more fundamental changes in Apple’s model. Greenpeace USA senior IT sector analyst Gary Cook said , “Rather than another recycling robot, what is most needed from Apple is an indication that the company is embracing one of the greatest opportunities to reduce its environmental impact: repairable and upgradeable product design.” Via Business Green Images via Apple

Go here to read the rest: 
Apple’s new recycling robot can disassemble 200 iPhones in a single hour

Bad Behavior has blocked 2129 access attempts in the last 7 days.