Wayks modular luggage is the ultimate sustainable travel companion

August 24, 2020 by  
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The versatile One bag by Wayks is designed to adapt to changing environments and conditions, whether you’re commuting in the city or having an outdoor adventure. It offers users the opportunity to travel with as little luggage as needed without sacrificing flexibility. One bag can be transformed into three different variations of luggage within seconds: a travel backpack, a smaller day pack and a separate pouch for items like toiletries and cameras. The upper part of the bag acts as the main space for storage, providing extra volume through a secure roll-top closure that can expand from 25 liters to 40 liters. There are two side pockets with enough space for a 1.5-liter bottle and a clamshell opening on the back that transforms the bag into a suitcase. The back section includes a padded compartment with a side zipper for a 16-inch laptop, a document sleeve and four additional pockets. Related: This durable luggage is made with replaceable and recycled materials There is a detachable back panel designed for longer travel with soft padding for maximum comfort while carrying larger loads and a pair of adjustable back straps. For those who don’t want a thicker strap, the included back straps can be replaced with a thinner version. The bottom compartment is designed to hold items that have become dirty, wet or fragile throughout your travels. Wayks’ mission is to inspire consumers to go off the beaten path and use its fair and sustainably made outdoor gear to take a break from their busy lives. Bags are made out of PFC-free and recycled fabrics and materials, helping save the environment from excessive carbon dioxide emissions and water consumption compared to similar products. What’s more, Wayks ensures that its workers are paid fairly and have ethical working conditions, with sites approved by the Fair Wear Foundation. Long-term, the company hopes to develop products that are 100% recyclable . + Wayks Photography by Aylaan Moodysson via Wayks

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Wayks modular luggage is the ultimate sustainable travel companion

Effects of COVID-19 lead to increased deaths of Florida manatees

July 1, 2020 by  
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While many species are enjoying a break from humans during the pandemic, Florida’s manatee death rate is up this year. Increased boating activity, rollbacks on emission caps and delays in environmental improvements all put these defenseless giants in the crosshairs. “There are several troubling factors coming together during the pandemic,” Patrick Rose, an aquatic biologist and executive director of the nonprofit Save the Manatee Club , told The Guardian . “Manatees were already facing accelerated habitat loss, rising fatalities from boat collisions and less regulatory protection. With COVID, we’re seeing manatees at an increased risk, both from policies that undermine environmental standards and from irresponsible outdoor activity, such as boaters ignoring slow-speed zones.” Related: Conservationists in Florida are making the ultimate effort to protect manatees from tourism Now with pandemic-related problems, manatee deaths were up almost 20% for April through May compared with 2019 figures. June exceeded the five-year death average. However, officials haven’t been able to establish causes for all manatee deaths because the Fish & Wildlife Commission isn’t doing necropsy — the word for “autopsy” when performed on animals — during the pandemic . Some manatees have undoubtedly been killed or injured by boat collisions. According to Rose, boat ramps remained open in March when other recreational options closed, leading to an uptick in dangerous boating activity. Slow-moving manatees often fail to get out of the way of boats. Injuries are so frequent that researchers tell the animals apart by their scar patterns. Regulatory changes also threaten manatee habitats. The marine mammals, which are most closely related to elephants, will reap the consequences of the EPA’s decision to suspend water and air pollution monitoring requirements during the pandemic. COVID-19 is also delaying environmental initiatives. In-person meetings have been postponed, including talks about providing more warm-water manatee habitat by breaching the Ocklawaha River dam. “We’ve lost tens of thousands of acres of seagrass over the past decade,” Rose said. “The power plants, which currently supply artificial warm water , will also be closing in the coming years, making our fight to protect natural warm springs habitat all the more critical.” Via The Guardian Image via Pixabay

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Effects of COVID-19 lead to increased deaths of Florida manatees

Reclaimed wood raft features an origami paper canopy

April 6, 2020 by  
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The innovative team at U.K.-based Inclume has come up with a unique way to take a break from the stresses of life. Its latest design is a reclaimed wood raft that accommodates two people. The Tetra raft even features a peaceful shading canopy made out of delicate, origami paper forms. Inspired by the shape of an abstracted sail, the volume of the raft incorporates multiple tetrahedron shapes. Entirely constructed out of reclaimed materials, Tetra achieves its buoyancy thanks to three old barrels that were donated to the team. Atop the barrels is the main platform, which is made of salvaged shipping pallets provided by a local carpenter. Several discarded garden bamboo canes comprise the frame and canopy. Even the boat’s oars, which were sanded and painted with a triangular motif, were donated from a local boat club. Related: Floating ICEBERG creatively confronts global warming With its tiny size and rustic nature, the reclaimed wood raft is perfect for an escape on the water. Adding a bit of serenity to the design is a beautiful, handcrafted canopy. This canopy consists of several triangular frames, which are crafted from thread entwined with recycled paper. The canopy is then covered in origami paper forms that add whimsy to the overall design. Intricately folded by hand, the paper forms sway gently in the wind and allow natural light and shade to dance across the raft. The Tetra raft was a temporary installation that took place on a local lake. During the day, passersby were encouraged to help the team construct parts of the raft on the shore. According to the designers, the aim of the event was not only to build a temporary, water-based shelter out of reclaimed materials, but to also encourage people to participate in similar projects in their communities. + Inclume Images via Inclume

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Reclaimed wood raft features an origami paper canopy

How Newspaper Became a Fashion Statement

September 24, 2010 by  
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Top eco-designers Samantha Pleet, Lara Miller, Bahar Shahpar and Anthony Lilore took a break from post-Fashion Week mayhem to participate in Yesterday’s News Do-Gooder Design Challenge.

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How Newspaper Became a Fashion Statement

Ed Begley, Jr., Takes on Fox, Martha Talks Turkey, and More (Video)

November 27, 2009 by  
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Planet Green star Ed Begley Jr.

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Ed Begley, Jr., Takes on Fox, Martha Talks Turkey, and More (Video)

Under Attack, Michael Mann, In His Own Words

November 27, 2009 by  
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Penn State’s Michael Mann You know the story by now.

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Under Attack, Michael Mann, In His Own Words

Giving Thanks

November 23, 2009 by  
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Originally, I thought I was going to continue building on my Chicago post-occupancy study rant on energy modeling for this week’s column, but then I realized that: 1) I need a break from being a pissant; and 2) I’ve got a lot to be thankful for.  

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Giving Thanks

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