One million people show solidarity with Dakota Access Pipeline protesters by checking in on Facebook

November 1, 2016 by  
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People are jumping on social media to show their support for the Dakota Access Pipeline protesters. Over one million people checked in to the Standing Rock Indian Reservation and Standing Rock, North Dakota on Facebook in an effort to bewilder police. While law enforcement claims they’re not tracking people via Facebook, supporters continue to check in and show solidarity. On Monday, a Facebook post challenged people to back pipeline protesters on the ground and “overwhelm and confuse” law enforcement by checking in to Standing Rock, North Dakota on Facebook. Thousands responded, including the Morton County Sheriff’s Department, which said on Facebook , “The Morton County Sheriff’s Department is not and does not follow Facebook check-ins for the protest camp or any location. This claim/rumor is absolutely false.” Related: Dakota Access Pipeline protesters raise over $1 million on GoFundMe This statement didn’t deter the thousands of people who checked in and continue to check in on Facebook. Sacred Stone Camp says they did not start the Facebook movement but in a statement emailed to Mic said checking in is a “great way to express solidarity” and that there is “no doubt that law enforcement monitor communications and comb social media for incriminating material.” They also noted there are many other actions people can take beyond a Facebook check in. They asked people to consider their own consumption of fossil fuels , and get involved with environmental or indigenous struggles near their own homes. They called on CitiBank, Mizho Bank, and the Bank of Tokyo to deny the Dakota Access Pipeline a $1.1 billion loan. Supporters of the protesters can also contribute to legal defense on FundRazr or donate to Sacred Stone Camp on GoFundMe . Sacred Stone Camp also called for more people to actually come to Standing Rock, saying “We also need 10,000 to 100,000 people to join us here on the ground. Now.” Via The Guardian and Mic Images via Fibonacci Blue on Flickr and Sacred Stone Camp Facebook

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One million people show solidarity with Dakota Access Pipeline protesters by checking in on Facebook

A massive Celtic cross made out of thousands of trees has secretly sprouted up in an Irish forest

November 1, 2016 by  
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Passengers flying over Ireland ’s County Donegal have been struck by a curious formation in the treetops , posting their findings to social media and gaining the public’s attention. It seems some crafty person has quietly planted two different varieties of trees within this massive forest , creating the image of a gigantic Celtic cross from above. Aerial shots have been taken by passengers flying into the City of Derry Airport, prompting UTV Northern Ireland to take flyover footage of the scene. The team discovered the emblem was created by local man Liam Emmery, a late forester in the area. Emmery passed away in 2010, but not before planting the differing tree types in the iconic formation. UTV reports , “Even his family knew little about his creation.” Related: Zero-carbon housing development welcomes its first families in North Ireland Apparently, the cross has been visible for a few years, yet this year’s particularly dry autumn has made the light yellow colors of the trees pop against the surrounding greenery. The cross is estimated to be 300 feet long and contain thousand of trees. Gareth Austin, a local horticulturist, told UTV, “We’re going to be appreciating this for the next sixty or seventy years.” Via Atlas Obscura , ITV Images via UTV (screenshot)

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A massive Celtic cross made out of thousands of trees has secretly sprouted up in an Irish forest

Armed police arrest 141 protesters over Dakota Access Pipeline

October 28, 2016 by  
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Morton County Sheriff’s Department said they arrested 141 people protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline . Officers who performed the arrests were reportedly armed and wearing riot gear, and arrived with soldiers and military Humvees. An airplane and helicopters monitoring the scene from above showed a string of law enforcement officials standing down protestors lined up on a bridge. On October 27 at 11:15 AM Mountain Time law enforcement began moving towards people protesting the pipeline on land owned by Energy Transfer Partners close to Cannon Ball, North Dakota . The Morton County Sheriff’s Department said they told protesters they were ” free to go ” and asked them to move to the south camp, which is on federally owned land. Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier said it was a ” public safety issue ” as protesters were blocking roads and “trespassing on private property.” Related: Donald Trump has a yuge vested interest in the Dakota Access Pipeline The sheriff’s department reported violence and even said a woman shot at law enforcement with a .38 caliber revolver. The Indigenous Life Movement said the woman was in fact holding a prayer staff . Protesters contend it’s not their actions, but the pipeline that is illegal, and that the corporation behind the pipeline stole the land . Standing Rock Sioux tribe chairman Dave Archambault II wrote a letter to US Attorney General Loretta Lynch dated October 24, requesting the government investigate “overall militarization of law enforcement response.” In the letter he said, “Peaceful protests are being met with military vehicles and heavily armed law enforcement personnel in riot gear. Rather than seeking to keep the peace, law enforcement personnel are clearly working in tandem with private security of Dakota Access…This country has a long and sad history of using military force against indigenous people – including the Sioux Nation. I would like to think that those days are past – and that today Tribal rights cannot be ignored and military force cannot be used to suppress Indian people. But when I see the militarization taking place in North Dakota against Indian people, I am genuinely concerned.” Via NPR Images via Morton County Sheriff’s Department Facebook , Stand Against Dakota Access Pipeline – No DAPL Facebook , and Myron Dewey Facebook

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Armed police arrest 141 protesters over Dakota Access Pipeline

Judge rejects riot charges against journalist Amy Goodman for Dakota Access Pipeline coverage

October 18, 2016 by  
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A North Dakota judge has thrown out charges against journalist Amy Goodman after she filmed oil company security using pepper spray and dogs on protesters at the Dakota Access Pipeline . The Democracy Now! host could have spent multiple months in jail if Judge John Grinsteiner hadn’t rejected the charges in a move widely praised for upholding freedom of the press. At first the state attorney office of North Dakota charged Goodman with “criminal trespass,” but later decided to switch to riot charges after they admitted “legal issues with providing the notice of trespassing requirements in the statute,” as reported by Democracy Now! Related: Oil company sics attack dogs on Native American protesters in North Dakota State attorney Ladd Erickson did his best to charge Goodman with something; he told a local newspaper she was “a protester, basically,” and that she was only working to justify actions taken by protesters. He said in an email she “was not acting as a journalist” even though the first trespass complaint described Goodman as a reporter since she identified herself on camera and conducted interviews. Goodman could have spent as much as a year in jail if the riot charges hadn’t been rejected. One of her lawyers, Reed Brody told The Guardian the disturbing case was a “real outlier in general.” But the state attorney’s office may already be trying to pin Goodman down on another charge. Local county sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier said in a statement, “I am assured charges are being considered against these individuals. Let me make this perfectly clear, if you trespass on private property, you will be arrested.” For now, many people are thrilled freedom of the press won the day. In a Democracy Now! article, Goodman said, “This is a complete vindication of my right as a journalist to cover the attack on the protesters, and of the public’s right to know what is happening with the Dakota Access pipeline. We will continue to report on this epic struggle of Native Americans and their non-Native allies taking on the fossil fuel industry and an increasingly militarized police in this time when climate change threatens the planet.” Via The Guardian and Democracy Now! Images via Amy Goodman Facebook and screenshot

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Judge rejects riot charges against journalist Amy Goodman for Dakota Access Pipeline coverage

What is the Dakota Access Pipeline project? We explain…

September 13, 2016 by  
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Dominating the headlines this past week has been coverage of the Dakota Access Pipeline and the ensuing protests by both Native American tribes and environmental groups who oppose the construction and operation of the project. The pipeline developers promise economic benefits and a reduced dependence on foreign energy, while native tribes, in particular, the Standing Rock Sioux , lambast the project for the threat it poses to sacred land and their drinking water supply . To understand what is happening with this rapidly developing situation, here are five things to know about the project and the people involved. What is the Dakota Access Pipeline project? The Dakota Access Pipeline would bring crude oil across 1,168 miles and four states from the oil-rich Bakken Formation area of North Dakota all the way to Illinois. Also referred to as the Bakken Pipeline, the project would carry 470,000 barrels of crude oil to refineries and markets each day, according to CNN . The Bakken Formation is a unit of rock spanning parts of Montana and North Dakota, as well as the Canadian territories of Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Oil was first discovered underneath the formation in the 1950s and the US Geological Survey estimates an available 7.4 million barrels of oil lie in wait under just the US portion of land. Why is it being built? Dakota Access, a subsidiary of Energy Transfer Crude Oil, has developed the project as a way to lessen US dependence on foreign oil . By creating an underground pipeline, they claim the resource can be transported in a more environmentally responsible way, as compared to having to rely on railways and transporting by truck. Economic arguments for the project include the creation of an estimated 8,000-12,000 construction jobs, as well as the amount of money that could be made on the oil. An estimated $156 million could be made in sales and income taxes by state and local governments. This would, arguably, offset the $3.7 million undertaking to bring the pipeline to life. Who is protesting its construction? The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, a federally recognized tribe located on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, have filed a federal complaint against the pipeline project. They claim the construction and operation of the pipeline would destroy sites of valuable cultural and historic significance, as well as threaten “the Tribe’s environmental and economic well-being.” There is also concern that digging underneath the Missouri River could impact the drinking water supply. Dave Archambault II, chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, cited existing laws that require federal agencies to take these sacred sites into concern, yet that “the Army Corps has ignored all those laws and fast-tracked this massive project just to meet the pipeline’s aggressive construction schedule.” Other tribes, celebrities, and outraged citizens have joined the protests. A group of 30 environmental agencies, including Greenpeace and the Sierra Club , penned a letter to President Obama demanding he axe the project, like he did with the Keystone XL Pipeline . They say the Dakota Access project is “yet another example of an oil pipeline project being permitted without public engagement or sufficient environmental review.” What is happening at these protests? Many people are first hearing about the controversy after seeing footage of protests in North Dakota turning violent. Last weekend, demonstrators from the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe encountered private security officers from developer Energy Transfer Partners. These officers threatened protestors with dogs , leading to multiple people – and dogs – on both sides becoming injured. The use of pepper spray on dozens of people was also documented. The Morton County Sheriff’s Office describes the scene as a “riot,” mentioning protestors breaking through a wire fence and entering the area where construction was taking place. Tim Menz, Sr., who helped the tribe start its Tribal Historic Preservation Office, stated the bulldozers had already destroyed an ancient burial site and members were denied the opportunity to search for disturbed human remains. The Sioux Tribe’s requested the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia issue a temporary restraining order against the company, yet U.S. Judge James Boasberg declined the request on Friday. A surprise announcement by the U.S. government moments later, however, revealed an override of the court’s decision and a temporary block on the pipeline’s construction. A joint statement from the Department of Justice, the Department of the Interior, and the U.S. Army read, “Construction of the pipeline on Army Corps land bordering or under Lake Oahe will not go forward at this time.” Why should we care? While an oil pipeline would provide construction jobs and a supply of domestic fuel, the implications of building and operating such a project extend much further. The risk of oil spills and the effects on local drinking water and larger aquatic ecosystems is enough for some to oppose a pipeline anytime and anywhere. Furthering our dependence on oil as an energy source, whether obtained domestically or abroad, also runs counter to environmentalists’ mission to grow sustainable and renewable forms of energy production. On a humanitarian level, the disregard for native people’s culture, historically significant sites, and land is a violation on an enormous scale. MSNBC’s Last Word host Lawrence O’Donnell reminded viewers that the US is a nation “founded on genocide” and theft of Native people. He states, “And so we face the prospect next month of the descendants of the first people to ever set foot on that land being arrested by the descendants of the invaders who seized that land, arrested for trespassing.” Images via Wikipedia , Flickr ( 1 , 2 , 3 )

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What is the Dakota Access Pipeline project? We explain…

France is an affordable tiny house that snaps together in just 3 hours

September 13, 2016 by  
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KBodaWCdADs Despite its patriotic coloration and name, Tiny House France was assembled in the Czech Republic just south of Prague. The structure was built from 21 insulated panels connected with threaded rods. This setup makes it easy to assemble and disassemble the home as needed. The house is topped with a classic gabled roof and is elevated off the ground, no foundation necessary. Related: How to build a compact and multifunctional Cheryl Cabin with just $3K of materials The house is split into three main spaces partitioned by color. The section painted blue houses the bedroom and “night zone”, a decision motivated by the architect’s belief that the color blue “is the most suitable for a good night’s sleep.” The communal area with multifunctional seating and a table are located in the white-colored “day zone” and divided from the bedroom by a multifunctional partition that doubles as shelving. The final red-colored “heating zone” contains the wood-burning stove and kitchenette. + Pin-Up Houses Images via Pin-Up Houses

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France is an affordable tiny house that snaps together in just 3 hours

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