Tactile ‘Cabin of Curiosities’ was built with 4,500 3D-printed ceramic tiles

March 19, 2018 by  
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We’ve already established that San Francisco-based Emerging Objects (founded by Ronald Rael) is quickly becoming the king of innovative 3D printing , but their latest design is taking the world of 3D architecture to new levels. The Cabin of Curiosities is an amazing tiny house, built with more than 4,500 3D printed ceramic tiles. Through a strategic arrangement, the front facade is integrated with the company’s “planter tile” system, which creates a base for a garden wall. The exterior of the cabin is a textural facade made up of thousands of 3D printed tiles . The unique facade system incorporates the company’s own creation called “Seed Stitch” walls. The system, which is named for a knitting technique, involves printing the tiles at extremely high speeds resulting in deliberate anomalies. The batch of uneven tiles looks like they were handmade, giving the structure a unique character. Using galvanized metal J moldings, the tiles are hung on the frame of the building. Related: 10 ways 3D printing is disrupting the architecture industry On the interior, the cabin’s walls are clad with the company’s translucent “Chroma Curl Wall”. Made with a bio-based plastic derived from corn, the texture and aesthetic are another feature unique to Emerging Objects . The interior is lit by color-changing LED lights giving the space a trippy, but serene feel. The interior has been decorated with several of Emerging Objects’ own creations such as 3D printed furniture , pottery, and lamps. The design for the cabin, which recently made its debut at SXSW, has been a long-time coming for the innovative designers. According to Emerging Objects, the structure is a culmination of various years of 3D innovation and shows how 3D printing is pushing the world of architecture forward. + Emerging Objects Via Archinect Photos by Matthew Millman va Emerging Objects

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Tactile ‘Cabin of Curiosities’ was built with 4,500 3D-printed ceramic tiles

Disney’s ‘World of Pandora’ Avatar park opens with floating mountains and glowing forests

May 30, 2017 by  
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Now Avatar fans can finally explore the amazing world of Pandora in person. The much-anticipated Pandora – World of Avatar opened this past weekend at Orlando’s Walt Disney World Resort, and it looks spectacular. Guests can explore the alien planet’s bioluminescent rainforest, hike through floating mountains, and even take a thrilling 3D ride on the back of a wild banshee. The 12-acre park has been under construction for six years, and it looks like it was well worth the wait. The park is set in an area of Pandora that was not seen in the film called the Valley of Mo’ar. The alien planet was designed by director James Cameron, whose ultra-creative attention to detail has resulted, once again, in a jaw-dropping immersive 3D experience. Related: Save the dates: this is when Disney’s “Avatar” and “Star Wars” theme parks open Visitors to the valley will be able to explore the mystical jungle landscape with flowing streams, dark caves full of bioluminescent life and a “floating” mountain range called the Hallelujah Mountains. A boat ride down the dark Na’vi River will lead through pulsating, glowing vegetation to an encounter with a Na’vi shaman. For those looking for a more thrilling experience, visitors can also participate in the “Avatar Flight of Passage” 3D adventure . Guests are matched with an onscreeen avatar and take their place on a motorcycle-like flight simulator. Once in place, guests will “soar” across the valley on the back of a banshee, plunging straight down into the lush vegetation only to swoop up through the massive trees, continuing around the mountains as herds of wild beasts run underneath you. + Pandora — World of Avatar Via CNN Images via Disney World

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Disney’s ‘World of Pandora’ Avatar park opens with floating mountains and glowing forests

This spellbinding icy blue throne was 3D-printed by robots

April 19, 2017 by  
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The robotically 3D-printed Voxel Chair 1.0 looks like it came straight out of a science fiction film. The futuristic mesh-like prototype was designed by Manuel Jimenez Garcia and Gilles Retsin , and manufactured using extruded PLA plastic through Robotic Additive Manufacturing Platform (RAMP), an innovative process that enables 3D printing of large-scale products with stunning detail and durability. The Voxel Chair, whose shape is inspired by the  Panton chair design, is the first prototype of its kind using new software that is specifically developed for robotic 3D printing. Unlike most 3D printing processes that use pre-defined forms, this innovative software – based on research by Manuel Jimenez Garcia and Gilles Retsin – allows for optimal control of thousands of line fragments. Related: Lilian van Daal creates a Biomimicry-inspired, 3D-printed chair Designed in collaboration with fabrication firms Nagami.Design and Vicente Soler, the chair was built out of transparent PLA, a non-toxic, biodegradable plastic that can be made out of various renewable resources like corn starch. Cyan-colored particles were mixed into the plastic to give the chair its unique glass-like appearance. The unique chair is just one example of how the RAMP process can be used to build stronger 3D-printed products . Considering the breakneck speed of advances in the field, unprecedented large-scale 3D objects are only a matter of time. The Voxel Chair 1.0 is currently on display at the Imprimer Le Monde in Centre Pompidou Paris. + Manuel Jimenez Garcia + Gilles Retsin Via Ignant Images via Manuel Jimenez Garcia, Gilles Retsin and Nagami.Design

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This spellbinding icy blue throne was 3D-printed by robots

This crazy boot-shaped tiny house could only exist in Texas

April 19, 2017 by  
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Only in Texas, people. This whimsical boot-shaped home may look like a quirky roadside stop, but it’s actually a fully functioning home available for rent . Designed and built by Dan Phillips of Phoenix Commotion – a firm that specializes in building affordable homes using reclaimed materials – the unique 2 bedroom, 1 bath home comes with custom features, a nice yard, and even a stunning rooftop deck “to boot”! The cowboy boot home, which is located in Huntsville, Texas, looks solitary from most angles, but it’s actually connected to a small tin-roofed bungalow with a wrap-around porch. The addition was added on to increase the total floorspace to a compact, but livable 711 square feet . Related: Beekeeper built dream hexagonal house without ‘hateful’ right angles Things are just as curious on the interior as they are outside. Dan Phillips has made a name for himself for building with whatever reclaimed materials he can find, and the cowboy boot house is no different. Throughout the home, the walls are clad in various wood pieces collected from other building sites. Shards of tiles make up the mosaic flooring, and parts of the ceiling are plastered in vintage record covers. The home has two bedrooms (one of which is accessed by ladder,) a single bathroom, and a kitchen clad in undulating metal sheets. A red spiral staircase leads to a rooftop deck located on the highest level of the boot. Although the boot home does have its roadside quality, the people behind the design, Phoenix Commotion, have more than just quirky homes in their portfolio. Since 1997, the company has constructed over 20 eco-friendly, affordable homes using reclaimed materials in the Huntsville area. All of their projects are built with help from future tenants, who tend to be low-income families. + Phoenix Commotion Via New Atlas Images via Har.com

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This crazy boot-shaped tiny house could only exist in Texas

BigDelta machine 3D-prints durable, affordable houses from dirt

July 19, 2016 by  
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Last year Italian company World’s Advanced Saving Project (WASP) debuted BigDelta, a 40-foot-tall 3D-printer that prints affordable, sustainable homes . Now they’re organizing workshops and inviting local makers to participate as they work towards printing their first Earth home in an Italian “technological village” called Shamballa . Constructed from a locally-sourced mix of dirt and straw, these ecological homes are notably “light and strong.”

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BigDelta machine 3D-prints durable, affordable houses from dirt

A swarm of earthquakes rattles central California

July 19, 2016 by  
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A series of small earthquakes rattled central California , beginning Sunday evening and continuing into Monday, but the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) says there is no cause for alarm. The phenomenon, called an earthquake swarm, is actually fairly common in regions with a high level of geological activity (such as California). Despite the number of quakes—18 or more within a day’s time—the strongest registered a magnitude 3.7, which is not very strong as earthquakes go and no significant damage has been reported. With a sharp increase in earthquake activity, one might wonder whether bigger quakes are on the way. But USGS reports that swarms like this have not been connected to larger earthquakes occurring in the same region. The agency’s definition of an earthquake swarm, or seismic swarm , is actually fairly loose, referring simply to a cluster of small quakes happening in one area with no requirement for a set time period. The quakes don’t even have to occur along the same fault line to be considered part of the swarm. Related: Chance of California megaquake within next three decades increases The earthquake swarm in California may already be over, or additional tremors may still be on the horizon, but it’s unlikely they will lead to anything more substantial. Yellowstone National Park has seen a number of earthquake swarms over the years, with the largest happening in 2004, 2009, and 2010. That most recent swarm included more than 2,000 quakes over the course of a month. Although several registered a magnitude over 3.0, the swarm didn’t lead to any type of larger earthquake or other catastrophic event. Via Gizmodo Images via Shutterstock and  USGS

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A swarm of earthquakes rattles central California

Elon Musk uses Iron Man-inspired holographic 3-D user interface to print a rocket part

February 22, 2015 by  
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After Elon Musk announced plans to post a video of himself using a holographic computer interface inspired by the one Tony Stark uses in the film Iron Man, it looks like the Tesla CEO and inventor has delivered. In the video, which you can see after the jump, Musk shows a rocket part with hand gestures and then prints it using titanium. Read the rest of Elon Musk uses Iron Man-inspired holographic 3-D user interface to print a rocket part Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3D printing , 3d Technology , CEO Elon Musk tesla motors , elon musk , Elon Musk 3d Hologram , Elon Musk invention , green technology , Hand Manipulated 3D Hologram , high-tech gadgets , holographic technology , Iron Man , Iron Man hologram , Iron Man movie , Iron Man technology , Tesla Motors

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Elon Musk uses Iron Man-inspired holographic 3-D user interface to print a rocket part

No hardware store? No problem. Astronauts just 3D printed a working wrench in space

December 23, 2014 by  
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Launching anything into space requires a massive amount of time, money and resources. So what if astronauts could just “print out” anything they need? Now they can! Astronauts on the International Space Station recently used a 3D printer to print out a socket wrench, which they then used. Can a Star Trek-style replicator be far behind? Read the rest of No hardware store? No problem. Astronauts just 3D printed a working wrench in space Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3d print polymers , 3d Printed space station , 3D printing , 3d Technology , 3d technology construction , made in space , nasa , space , space technology

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No hardware store? No problem. Astronauts just 3D printed a working wrench in space

Two-Year-Old Gains Use of Her Arms Thanks to 3D Printed Robotic Exoskeleton

August 6, 2012 by  
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Two-year-old Emma LaVelle wanted to play with the other children, but a congenital disorder prevented her from using her arms. Now, with the help of 3D printing, Emma  can lift toys and draw pictures with her friends. Stratasys , a pioneer in Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) and 3D printing , has worked with Emma’s doctors at Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children  to create a custom plastic robotic exoskeleton that allows Emma to overcome her disorder. Read the rest of Two-Year-Old Gains Use of Her Arms Thanks to 3D Printed Robotic Exoskeleton Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3D printing , 3D robotic arms , 3d Technology , Emma Lavelle , exoskeleton , Mobility assistance , mobility devices , Robotic arms , Stratasys

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Two-Year-Old Gains Use of Her Arms Thanks to 3D Printed Robotic Exoskeleton

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