Innovative Future Tree was built by robots and 3D-printing

July 29, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Innovative Future Tree was built by robots and 3D-printing

Robotic construction has taken another step forward with the Future Tree, a recently completed timber canopy built with robots in a project by Gramazio Kohler Research and ETH Zurich . Completed in October 2019, following 2 years of planning and approximately 4 months of construction, the Future Tree is a study of complex timber structures and digital concrete. The tree-like canopy was installed over the courtyard of the office building extension of Basler & Hofmann in Esslingen, Switzerland. An industrial robot was used to fabricate and assemble the Future Tree’s 380 timber elements made from acetylated pine wood and fitted with full-threaded screws and tension cables to form a reciprocal frame. The structure’s canopy-like crown is supported by a single, trunk-like concrete column and anchored to the office building on two sides while cantilevering on the opposite corner. Related: Robots weave an insect-inspired carbon-fiber forest in London “The frame’s geometry is informed by its structural behaviour, differentiating its flexural rigidity by playing with the opening of the reciprocal knots to achieve a higher stiffness in the cantilevering part,” Gramazio Kohler Research’s explained. “To integrate geometric, structural and fabrication concerns we developed a custom computational model of the design.” Perhaps the most noteworthy aspect of the project is Future Tree’s reinforced concrete column, which was made with a novel fabrication process called “Eggshell” that combines an ultra-thin, robotically 3D-printed formwork with fast-hardening concrete. As the first built example using this fabrication process, Future Tree “shows [how] non-standard concrete structures can be fabricated efficiently, economically and sustainably,” according to Gramazio Kohler Research. Because the formwork — which is 3D-printed to a thickness of 1.5 millimeters using a robotic arm — is filled with fast-hardening concrete in a layer-by-layer casting process to minimize hydrostatic pressure, it can be recycled and reused after the concrete has hydrated. + Gramazio Kohler Research Images by Gramazio Kohler Research, ETH Zurich and Basler & Hofmann AG

See original here:
Innovative Future Tree was built by robots and 3D-printing

Futuristic DFAB HOUSE is digitally built with robots and 3D printers

July 15, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Futuristic DFAB HOUSE is digitally built with robots and 3D printers

The homes of the future could be built with robots — that is the narrative that DFAB HOUSE, an experimental “house” in Switzerland’s municipality of Dübendorf, hopes to promote. Set atop Empa and Eawag’s modular research and innovation building NEST, the three-story structure completed last year serves as a testing ground and showroom for cutting-edge smart home technology and robotic construction . Built largely with digital means, the inhabitable “home” is also smart in terms of energy consumption; it includes rooftop solar panels that supply, on average, one-and-a-half times as much electricity as the structure needs as well as heat exchangers that harvest hot wastewater from showers. <img src="//inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2020/07/DFAB-HOUSE-9-889×592.jpg" alt="large glass and concrete building topped with a white extension" class="wp-image-2274915" Researchers from eight professorships at ETH Zurich collaborated with industrial partners to not only digitally plan DFAB HOUSE but also make it habitable for academic guests and visiting scholars of Empa and Eawag. The innovative construction has created an otherworldly interior landscape — defined by curvaceous walls and a wavy concrete ceiling cast in 3D-printed formwork — that Empa likens to the Swiss artist H.R. Giger’s Alien film sets. Related: Robots weave an insect-inspired carbon-fiber forest in London The ground floor, which houses the common areas, is built mainly of concrete, while the two upper residential floors are characterized by wooden frames fabricated by construction robots. In addition to a home automation system that coordinates all energy consumption, guest residents also benefit from an intelligent multistage burglar protection system, automated glare and shading options and networked intelligent household appliances that even include a smart hot water kettle. 

See the original post: 
Futuristic DFAB HOUSE is digitally built with robots and 3D printers

Czech Republics first 3D-printed floating home will take just 48 hours to build

June 12, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Czech Republics first 3D-printed floating home will take just 48 hours to build

The first 3D-printed house in Czech Republic is scheduled for completion by the end of June 2020. Not only will the project, called Prvok, only take about 48 hours to build, but this floating home will also set an example for innovative affordable housing solutions for the future. The project will be printed with partially self-sustaining green technology , including a re-circulation shower, a green roof and well reservoirs for water. It is a collaboration between sculptor Michal Trpak and building society Stavebni sporitelna Ceske sporitelny. Related: This clothing tech company is 3D-printing garments to help reduce waste Once completed, the home will have been built seven times faster than conventional houses, saving up to 50% of construction costs compared to a regular building, all while reducing construction waste and carbon emissions by about 20% along the way. It is printed using a highly advanced robotic arm that moves 15 centimeters per second. To create the structure, a specially developed concrete mixture enriched with nano-polypropylene fibers, plasticizers and a setting accelerator will flow through a tip in the robotic arm. While Prvok will have the ability to float via pontoon anchor, the house will also be designed to stand on land, suitable for long-term living in both the country and the city. The nearly 463-square-foot living space will feature three rooms in total: a bedroom, a bathroom and a combination living room/kitchen. The design renderings feature a substantial green roof as well as massive porthole windows, an exposed concrete exterior and wood plank flooring for a unique, nautical appearance. According to Trpak, future owners of the 3D-printed home will be able to crush the building once it has reached the end of its life and reprint it again using the recycled material at the same location, making it long-lasting as well as sustainable. Stavebni sporitelna Ceske sporitelny hopes that the Prvok home will demonstrate the possibilities for more accessible and affordable housing options throughout the Czech Republic. + Prvok Images via Prvok

See the rest here: 
Czech Republics first 3D-printed floating home will take just 48 hours to build

This clothing tech company is 3D-printing garments to help reduce waste

June 8, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This clothing tech company is 3D-printing garments to help reduce waste

Did you know that 85% of textiles ends up in landfills? While plenty of environmental data exists to focus on what happens to clothing at the end of its life, Copenhagen-based Son of a Tailor wants to bring awareness to the fact that textile waste is abundant at the manufacturing stage, too. At the manufacturing level, a large amount of usable material is wasted due to fabric cut-offs during production and mass-produced clothing that often goes unsold. Now, a fashion-meets-tech company is doing its part to end that unsustainable cycle. Son of a Tailor has been around since 2014, already known for creating custom, made-to-order T-shirts, and now it is aiming to eliminate waste even further with the world’s first 3D-knitted pullover sweater. Related: The sustainable wardrobe — it’s more accessible than you think Customers input individual measurements, such as height and weight, and a custom size is created through an algorithm on the website. For the T-shirts and polos, each individual garment pattern is fitted like puzzle pieces to minimize waste, then cut with a laser and sewn together. Unlike most mass-produced clothing, each Son of a Tailor shirt is constructed by the same person from start to finish. Going a step further, the new pullovers are created using an advanced, 3D-knitting machine. Each pullover is constructed in one whole piece, reducing the amount of cut-off waste from 20% to less than 1%. Son of a Tailor exclusively uses 100% extra-long staple cotton grown in California and superfine Merino wool from Australia. Both materials are tested for allergens and harmful substances and are knitted in Europe. There is no warehouse or store full of unsold clothing. Garments are only made if they are needed, meaning the company goes against the norm of fast fashion . Nothing ends up in the trash if it is unsold or goes out of style. A T-shirt will cost between $48-$64, and a pullover is between $117-$156, depending on the custom fit. The long cotton fibers and high-quality, durable wool make the products less prone to wear and tear, so the fabric stays soft and bright even after multiple washes. The company also offers a 100% satisfaction guarantee and will remake an item for customers who are unhappy with the garment fit. + Son of a Tailor Images via Son of a Tailor

See more here: 
This clothing tech company is 3D-printing garments to help reduce waste

CX Landscape proposes futuristic coastal park in response to climate change

May 19, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on CX Landscape proposes futuristic coastal park in response to climate change

Australia-based CX Landscape has unveiled designs for Sea Line Park, a conceptual project to link the eastern and western inner suburbs of Melbourne with a linear coastal park. Designed to serve as a new line of defense against rising waters, the Sea Line Park would comprise three islands, two pontoon bridges and undersea roads to provide a new direct connection between Williams Town to the west and Elwood in the east. The fantastical proposal would also draw power from renewable sources, including tidal and solar power. Bookended by two movable pontoon bridges, the Sea Line Park consists of three curvaceous green islands : two “Sports Islands” flanking a central “Art Island”. The Sports Islands would function as public outdoor recreation space for both active and passive programs. The Art Island serves primarily as an events space and would be home to a large north-facing meadow that can host open cinemas, performances, markets and other events. A naturalistic landscape with pedestrian and cyclist paths would be integrated onto all islands. Related: Olson Kundig solar sail proposal could power up to 200 Melbourne homes with clean energy The linear parks would also house a live seed bank within a series of pods, the design of which is inspired by the diamond-patterned totem polls of the Wurundjeri tribe. Solar panels would cover the exterior of each pod and — along with the tidal power generation units integrated in the two pontoon bridges — provide energy for the entire park. The islands are also punctuated by bubble-like structures that house seawater purification and freshwater storage systems. To address ocean waste, the designers have proposed using submarine robots to collect plastic ocean debris and repurposing the waste as raw material for 3D printing construction materials. “This park will grow, adapt and innovate with the help of cutting-edge technologies, to be resilient and resistant to natural disasters and climate change ,” the designers said. “A self-sustained living hub is suitable for any coastal cities around the world, which can carry the critical resources and civilizations to create a mobile global village.” + CX Landscape Images via CX Landscape

Here is the original post:
CX Landscape proposes futuristic coastal park in response to climate change

These pendant shades shine a light on recycled materials

May 18, 2020 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on These pendant shades shine a light on recycled materials

Innovative companies around the world are looking at everyday objects in a new light, and custom lighting fabrication and design studio LightArt is no exception. In fact, LightArt is moving “from waste to watts” with its newest line of pendant light shades made from recycled materials . The process began with the question, “What can we do with falloff material?” Finding the answer took over two years of research and development investment, but the result is a line of light-cover pendants made using additive manufacturing, also known as 3D printing.  Related: This lovely lampshade is made from cabbage Relying on 3D printing , the team at LightArt found the initial trials to be less than elegant. Ryan Smith and his team explained, “This is where things started to get really challenging. When we first started, it did not look polished — it looked like what you might expect when you’re trying to turn garbage into something beautiful. But we kept following the promise of the process and made something we’re so proud of.” Based out of Seattle, Washington, the team worked with parent company 3form and other companies involved in polymer development across the country to hammer out the finer details for the shade designs.  For now, LightArt is recycling waste materials from inside the plant, using new technology to sort out the black and white pieces for the desired look. With this upcycled waste, the company created seven shapes in each of the two shade colors. Diameters change with each shape but range from 8 inches to 12 inches. Called the Coil Collection, the pendants have a matte finish and a touch and feel that resembles handmade pottery. In addition to recycling cast-off materials, the company used PVC-free cord and TGIC-free powder coat for the canopy and interior hub for each of the pendant shapes. LightArt plans to continue in its efforts to produce quality, custom lighting options that are sustainable. According to the company’s website, “Under the guidance of Align, we aim to create net-positive products that will leave our planet in better condition than when we started.” + LightArt Images via LightArt

Read the rest here: 
These pendant shades shine a light on recycled materials

Architects turn waste wood into a 3D-printed cabin in upstate New York

May 11, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Architects turn waste wood into a 3D-printed cabin in upstate New York

A stunning cabin in upstate New York is making waves thanks to groundbreaking technology that allowed it to be 3D-printed with wood waste. Headed by architects Leslie Lok and Sasa Zivkovic, HANNAH was able to repurpose wood from ash trees damaged by an invasive beetle species to build the Ashen Cabin, a modern, tiny cabin completely constructed using 3D-printing of timber and concrete. Located in Ithaca, New York, the innovative cabin definitely stands out for its distinct shape. Ash wood cladding connects it to the lush woodland setting, while whimsical features, such as curved wood paneling and thick, triangular concrete pillars, create a futuristic, almost spaceship-like, feel. The prominent use of ash wood was specifically chosen to make use of damaged ash wood trees. Related: 3D-printed micro cabin in Amsterdam welcomes anyone to spend the night Tunneling into the trees’ bark to lay eggs, the dreaded Emerald Ash Borer is a major threat to America’s ash tree population. In their wake, these ruthless beetles leave 8.7 billion trees across the country so damaged that they cannot even be used by sawmills as lumber. Specifically, nearly one in 10 ash trees in New York state are destroyed by the pesky insects. But now, working with innovative design methods, HANNAH has discovered a remedy that can’t quite protect the trees from their beetle nemesis but enables a sustainable way to use the waste wood . Zivkovic explained, “Infested ash trees are a very specific form of ‘waste material’ and our inability to contain the blight has made them so abundant that we can — and should — develop strategies to use them as a material resource.” To begin the project, the firm decided on a two-tier process, first building a robotic platform that was specifically designed for processing the irregular ash trees and a separate system for using 3D-printed concrete. The first step was repurposing a six-axis robot arm found on eBay to cut pre-shaped planks that fit together like puzzle pieces. The repurposed robot allowed the designers to work with the otherwise worthless wood waste. The second step involved creating a solid, eco-friendly base for the cabin. Again going with a highly innovative processing strategy, the team manufactured nine interlocking, 3D-printed concrete segments that were used to form the footing, cabin floor, chimney and interior fixtures. This method avoided the need to build a large frame and base for the cabin. Using the minimum amount of concrete possible, the designers were able to reduce the project’s overall footprint while providing a strong, resilient base. With the durable concrete base and unique shaping of the wood volume, the cabin shows just how fun and functional sustainable architecture can be. + HANNAH Via The Architect’s Newspaper Photography by Andy Chen and Reuben Chen via HANNAH; drawings by HANNAH

Read the original: 
Architects turn waste wood into a 3D-printed cabin in upstate New York

Architects turn waste wood into a 3D-printed cabin in upstate New York

May 11, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Architects turn waste wood into a 3D-printed cabin in upstate New York

A stunning cabin in upstate New York is making waves thanks to groundbreaking technology that allowed it to be 3D-printed with wood waste. Headed by architects Leslie Lok and Sasa Zivkovic, HANNAH was able to repurpose wood from ash trees damaged by an invasive beetle species to build the Ashen Cabin, a modern, tiny cabin completely constructed using 3D-printing of timber and concrete. Located in Ithaca, New York, the innovative cabin definitely stands out for its distinct shape. Ash wood cladding connects it to the lush woodland setting, while whimsical features, such as curved wood paneling and thick, triangular concrete pillars, create a futuristic, almost spaceship-like, feel. The prominent use of ash wood was specifically chosen to make use of damaged ash wood trees. Related: 3D-printed micro cabin in Amsterdam welcomes anyone to spend the night Tunneling into the trees’ bark to lay eggs, the dreaded Emerald Ash Borer is a major threat to America’s ash tree population. In their wake, these ruthless beetles leave 8.7 billion trees across the country so damaged that they cannot even be used by sawmills as lumber. Specifically, nearly one in 10 ash trees in New York state are destroyed by the pesky insects. But now, working with innovative design methods, HANNAH has discovered a remedy that can’t quite protect the trees from their beetle nemesis but enables a sustainable way to use the waste wood . Zivkovic explained, “Infested ash trees are a very specific form of ‘waste material’ and our inability to contain the blight has made them so abundant that we can — and should — develop strategies to use them as a material resource.” To begin the project, the firm decided on a two-tier process, first building a robotic platform that was specifically designed for processing the irregular ash trees and a separate system for using 3D-printed concrete. The first step was repurposing a six-axis robot arm found on eBay to cut pre-shaped planks that fit together like puzzle pieces. The repurposed robot allowed the designers to work with the otherwise worthless wood waste. The second step involved creating a solid, eco-friendly base for the cabin. Again going with a highly innovative processing strategy, the team manufactured nine interlocking, 3D-printed concrete segments that were used to form the footing, cabin floor, chimney and interior fixtures. This method avoided the need to build a large frame and base for the cabin. Using the minimum amount of concrete possible, the designers were able to reduce the project’s overall footprint while providing a strong, resilient base. With the durable concrete base and unique shaping of the wood volume, the cabin shows just how fun and functional sustainable architecture can be. + HANNAH Via The Architect’s Newspaper Photography by Andy Chen and Reuben Chen via HANNAH; drawings by HANNAH

Read more: 
Architects turn waste wood into a 3D-printed cabin in upstate New York

Architects turn waste wood into a 3D-printed cabin in upstate New York

May 11, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Architects turn waste wood into a 3D-printed cabin in upstate New York

A stunning cabin in upstate New York is making waves thanks to groundbreaking technology that allowed it to be 3D-printed with wood waste. Headed by architects Leslie Lok and Sasa Zivkovic, HANNAH was able to repurpose wood from ash trees damaged by an invasive beetle species to build the Ashen Cabin, a modern, tiny cabin completely constructed using 3D-printing of timber and concrete. Located in Ithaca, New York, the innovative cabin definitely stands out for its distinct shape. Ash wood cladding connects it to the lush woodland setting, while whimsical features, such as curved wood paneling and thick, triangular concrete pillars, create a futuristic, almost spaceship-like, feel. The prominent use of ash wood was specifically chosen to make use of damaged ash wood trees. Related: 3D-printed micro cabin in Amsterdam welcomes anyone to spend the night Tunneling into the trees’ bark to lay eggs, the dreaded Emerald Ash Borer is a major threat to America’s ash tree population. In their wake, these ruthless beetles leave 8.7 billion trees across the country so damaged that they cannot even be used by sawmills as lumber. Specifically, nearly one in 10 ash trees in New York state are destroyed by the pesky insects. But now, working with innovative design methods, HANNAH has discovered a remedy that can’t quite protect the trees from their beetle nemesis but enables a sustainable way to use the waste wood . Zivkovic explained, “Infested ash trees are a very specific form of ‘waste material’ and our inability to contain the blight has made them so abundant that we can — and should — develop strategies to use them as a material resource.” To begin the project, the firm decided on a two-tier process, first building a robotic platform that was specifically designed for processing the irregular ash trees and a separate system for using 3D-printed concrete. The first step was repurposing a six-axis robot arm found on eBay to cut pre-shaped planks that fit together like puzzle pieces. The repurposed robot allowed the designers to work with the otherwise worthless wood waste. The second step involved creating a solid, eco-friendly base for the cabin. Again going with a highly innovative processing strategy, the team manufactured nine interlocking, 3D-printed concrete segments that were used to form the footing, cabin floor, chimney and interior fixtures. This method avoided the need to build a large frame and base for the cabin. Using the minimum amount of concrete possible, the designers were able to reduce the project’s overall footprint while providing a strong, resilient base. With the durable concrete base and unique shaping of the wood volume, the cabin shows just how fun and functional sustainable architecture can be. + HANNAH Via The Architect’s Newspaper Photography by Andy Chen and Reuben Chen via HANNAH; drawings by HANNAH

More:
Architects turn waste wood into a 3D-printed cabin in upstate New York

Tigers, humans at risk for coronavirus as ‘Tiger King’ zoo reopens

May 11, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Tigers, humans at risk for coronavirus as ‘Tiger King’ zoo reopens

We’ve already seen interspecies transmission of COVID-19 happen in the Bronx , where an asymptomatic zookeeper infected five tigers and four lions. Now, as the infamous Greater Wynnewood Exotic Animal Park reopens, will human visitors expose innocent tiger cubs to coronavirus ? Droves of people descended upon Oklahoma’s Greater Wynnewood Exotic Animal Park, made famous by the Netflix series ‘Tiger King’, when it reopened May 2. People are drawn by the hard-to-resist attraction of petting adorable tiger cubs, despite the cautions by wildlife experts. Related: ‘Tiger King’ drama overshadows abuse of captive tigers in US National Geographic reported on the first day the park resumed operations, noting the lack of pandemic precautions. The cubs worked long shifts and were expected to look cute for visitors who sometimes waited 4 hours to pet them. With hundreds of people feeding and petting tigers, the felines could contract the virus . It could also easily spread among the throngs of humans yearning to interact with tigers. Oklahoma’s pandemic restrictions had closed the Greater Wynnewood Exotic Animal Park for about a month. Many Netflix viewers had eagerly awaited its reopening. The true crime documentary miniseries ‘Tiger King’ focused on the life of former park owner Joe Maldonado-Passage, also known as Joe Exotic, who is now serving 22 years in prison for his crimes against humans and tigers. Maldonado-Passage’s former partner, Jeff Lowe, now owns the animal park. To keep a constant supply of darling cubs, some private facilities “speed breed” their tigers, according to National Geographic. Newborn cubs are quickly removed from their mother so that she goes into heat and breeds again. Cub-petting facilities constantly need little tigers that are in the sweet spot of 8 to 12 weeks old. Any bigger and they’ll be dangerous enough to hurt visitors. Tigers may then be bred, exhibited or possibly killed. At press time, the Bronx Zoo tigers and lions that tested positive for coronavirus are all recovering well. There have also been a few isolated cases of pet cats and dogs with the novel coronavirus. Via National Geographic Image via Wikimedia Commons

Read more here: 
Tigers, humans at risk for coronavirus as ‘Tiger King’ zoo reopens

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 5930 access attempts in the last 7 days.