3D-printed Aquaponic Homes grow their own veggies and fish

October 24, 2016 by  
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One of the finalists of Inhabitat’s recent Biodesign competition , Aquaponic Future Housing comprises a three-level home 3D-printed with biodegradable plastic that also has its own closed-loop aquaponics system. “A symbiosis between hydroponics and aquaculture,” aquaponics is a perfect example of a self-sufficient, living machine that produces food without creating waste or pollution. Simply put, an aquaponics system combines aquaculture (the raising of edible fish) and hydroponics (the growing of plants without soil) and consists of a hydroponic grow bed filled with plants positioned above a water tank containing fish or other aquatic life. Fish excrement and uneaten feed is filtered out of the water through the plants’ roots and is absorbed as essential ammonia-rich nutrients that allows plants to thrive. This win-win situation creates a highly productive ecosystem and yields more food per square foot than any other form of agriculture . Read more about aquaponics here. Related: Floating Jellyfish Lodge purify polluted water and air while growing food “The building uses novel structures and fabrication, proposing lightweight bend-active aquaponic towers, which sustain growing crops and fishing,” the designers write in their competition brief. “The towers enclose inhabitation units which are 3D printed using bioplastic created in-house from vegetable starch. This flexible house of the future acts as a Rep-Rap 3D printer using robotic fabrication for both weaving carbon enhanced bioplastic rods as well as extruding bioplastic layers.” One benefit of this unique housing program, according to the designers, is its ability to regenerate urban brownfield sites that have been marred by various pollutants and make more land available to house a rapidly growing population. “Similarly to aquaponics,” the designers say, “it enables a cradle-to-cradle lifestyle where fresh organic food and construction materials are produced in-house by the inhabitants.” +Mihai Chiriac Images via Mihai Chiriac

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3D-printed Aquaponic Homes grow their own veggies and fish

Crazy SkunkLock makes would-be bike thieves vomit

October 24, 2016 by  
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If you are sick and tired of having your bicycle stolen stolen, then we have just the thing for you. After he and several of his friends lost their bikes to sneaky thieves, inventor Daniel Idzkowski came up with the most bizarre solution. SkunkLock prevents bike theft by releasing a chemical deterrent released when a would-be thief tries to cut through the lock , and it’s noxious enough, nobody would want to stick around. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ba1OLoPIBfY Made with hardened medium-carbon steel , the black and white U-Lock contains a hidden pressurized deterrent that the company says actually induces vomiting in most cases. These noxious chemicals are so strong they “elicit an instinctive response to run away immediately,” according to the company’s Indiegogo page. They say it’s possible a bike might smell if the chemicals are released, but not likely, although they include disinfection instructions with their locks. Related: Engineering Students Create the World’s First Unstealable Bike What chemicals do they use? SkunkLock doesn’t quite disclose that information, saying they prefer to keep their formula a secret so thieves can’t figure out a way around it. They do say on their Indiegogo page that capsaicin compounds may be present in the lock, but that SkunkLock isn’t “strictly a pepper spray product.” While some bike owners may be deterred by the idea of noxious chemicals, SkunkLock assures people their bike lock is safe and legal. The company purposely skewed away from electronic and smart locks, saying electronics can fail or be dismantled. Instead their lock fights back, as per the company slogan. Once the chemicals are released, the company says the structural integrity should still be there but the lock won’t deter against thieves in the unique skunk-like fashion any more. There’s no expiration date on the bike lock, but the company plans to keep improving the technology and hopes SkunkLock owners will buy updated versions in the future. SkunkLock is currently crowdfunding on Indiegogo . A limited number of people can snag a SkunkLock for $99; from there the price goes up to $109 and then to $119. You can check out the campaign here . + SkunkLock + SkunkLock Indiegogo Campaign Images via SkunkLock Facebook and SkunkLock

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Crazy SkunkLock makes would-be bike thieves vomit

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