Giant robots and 3D printers are building a futuristic house in Switzerland

July 12, 2017 by  
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Researchers from ETH Zurich University plan to use giant robots and 3D printers to build “the first house in the world to be designed, planned and built using predominantly digital processes.” The DFAB House will fuse cutting-edge technologies – including 3D printing, robotic fabrication and prefab construction – to create a futuristic home worthy of the Jetsons. The researchers will collaborate with business partners to build the three-story, 656-square-foot house as part of the National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR) Digital Fabrication project. They will build it at NEST– research facility in Dübendorf, Switzerland , operated by the Empa institute. Related: Floating timber pavilion transforms a Swiss lake into an exciting new public square “Unlike construction projects that use only a single digital building technology, such as 3D-printed houses, the DFAB House brings a range of new digital building technologies together,” said the project’s initiator, ETH professor Matthias Kohler. Related: A 10K tiny house 3D-printed in 24 hours A six-foot tall robot mounted on caterpillar tracks will build steel-wire mesh sections which will have a dual role–it will function as formwork and reinforcement for concrete walls. The mesh is then filled with a concrete mix that forms a load-bearing wall topped with a 3D-printed ceiling slab. The house is scheduled to complete in summer 2018. It will function as a residential and working space for guest researchers and partners of the NEST project. + ETH Zurich + Empa Via Dezeen

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Giant robots and 3D printers are building a futuristic house in Switzerland

Royal Navy Helicopter transformed into an amazing hotel room in Scotland

July 12, 2017 by  
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Forget fancy tents and swanky treehouses – helicopter glamping is the next big trend in luxury camping . The folks at Helicopter Glamping have converted a decomissioned Royal Navy ZA127 Sea King Helicopter into one very unique hotel room, complete with a bed in the tail and a cozy seating area in the cockpit. Helicopter Glamping preserved many of the copter’s original features while giving the interior a sophisticated, modern touch. Set in the green pastures of Mains Farm in Stirling, Scotland, the helicopter has been insulated properly to ensure that the space stays cool in the summer months and warm in the winter. White wooden paneling covers the walls to enhance the interior space. Extra doors and windows were also added to the body to provide natural light and air circulation. Related: DROP box micro hotel lets you roam the world in nomadic luxury The luxury digs can sleep a family of five, with one lucky “passenger” staying in the single bed located in the copter’s tail. The hotel room has even been equipped with a mini kitchenette with stainless steel countertops and floating wood shelving. However, the highlight of the helicopter hotel is undoubtedly the cockpit, complete with its original flight deck – which has been converted into a cozy seating area with swivel seats and a table made from an old fuel tank cover. The large windshield offers guests beautiful panoramic views of Stirling’s expansive green landscape. + Helicopter Glamping Via Contemporist Images via Helicopter Glamping

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Royal Navy Helicopter transformed into an amazing hotel room in Scotland

A 10K tiny house 3D-printed in 24 hours

March 1, 2017 by  
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Building a house typically takes months, exacerbating the housing crisis so many people face worldwide. Apis Cor , a San Francisco-based company that specializes in 3D-printing , decided to tackle that crisis with a groundbreaking mobile 3D-printer that can print an entire 400-square-foot tiny home in just 24 hours. What’s more, doing so costs just over $10,000 – a steal compared to most modern homes. On their website, Apis Cor says the construction industry may be sluggish now, but they will persevere in disrupting that industry “until everyone is able to afford a place to live.” Their revolutionary mobile 3D-printer is small enough to be transported, so assembly and transportation costs can be slashed. Although their mobile printer only needs a day to print a home from a concrete mixture, the company says their buildings will last up to 175 years. Not only is their process speedy, but environmentally friendly and affordable too. Related: New 3D house printer cranks out 1,000 square feet a day https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xktwDfasPGQ The Russian house offers a promising beginning. Located at the Apis Cor test facility in Stupino, around 60 miles south of Moscow, the home was printed as a whole rather than assembled with pre-printed pieces. Apis Cor printed components like the building envelope, self-bearing walls, and partitions right on location. Winter couldn’t even stand in the little mobile printer’s way. Apis Cor printed the home last December, which was no big deal for their printer because it can function in temperatures down to negative 31 degrees Fahrenheit. The concrete mixture does require temperatures above 41 degrees Fahrenheit, however, so Apis Cor erected a tent over the tiny house site to plunge forward in cold weather. White decorative plaster finished the tiny home’s exterior, allowing the team to paint it in bright colors. The interior is bright and furnished with modern appliances from Samsung. In total, the house cost $10,134, or around $275 per square foot. + Apis Cor Via Curbed Images via Apis Cor

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A 10K tiny house 3D-printed in 24 hours

Robotically woven hexagonal pavilion heralds revolution in architecture

March 1, 2017 by  
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An exciting fusion between robotics and architecture is on the rise, and the potential of digital fabrication is wonderfully expressed in the stunning Elytra Filament Pavilion. Designed by a team at the University of Stuttgart , the robotically woven structure is now on view at Germany’s Vitra Design Museum after its premiere at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London . The experimental pavilion is an artistic exploration between architecture, engineering, and biomimicry principles, weaving carbon fiber into fibrous structures inspired by beetles. Installed as part of the Vitra’s “Hello, Robot. Design between Human and Machine” exhibition, the 200-square-meter Elytra Filament Pavilion shows off the power of robotics in architecture. The University of Stuttgart’s Institute for Computational Design (ICD) and the Institute of Building Structures and Structural Design (ITKE) developed a unique robotic fabrication technique to create the pavilion’s 40 modular hexagonal units, each of which weigh 45 kilograms and take about three hours to make. A computer algorithm determined the pavilion’s design, which was then produced with the help of a robot. Taking cues from the forewing shells of flying beetles known as elytra, the computer-programmed Kuka robot spun resin-soaked glass and carbon fibers into hexagonal scaffolds and densely wound fibers into the canopy. The entire pavilion weighs 2.5 tonnes and is “exceptionally lightweight,” weighing less than 9 kilograms per square meter. Related: Robots weave an insect-inspired carbon-fiber forest in London “With Elytra Filament Pavilion we aim to celebrate a truly contemporary and integrative approach to design, engineering and production, resulting in a distinctive spatial and aesthetic experience,” said Achim Menges, an architect behind the project. “The canopy grows in response to real-time sensing data, showcasing the profound impact of emerging technologies and related new alliances between the fields of design, engineering and natural science. Through this we seek to provide visitors with a unique experience that offers a glimpse of novel architectural and engineering possibilities, which may transform our built environment in the future.” + University of Stuttgart Images by Julien Lanoo

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Robotically woven hexagonal pavilion heralds revolution in architecture

Donald Trump would probably hate this crossable border wall

March 1, 2017 by  
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As a tongue-in-cheek response to Donald Trump’s mission to build a wall along the US and Mexico border, Rotterdam-based Atelier ARI has created an art installation called Open Border. Created for the annual Winnipeg Warming Huts event, the bright orange 9-foot-tall, 120-foot-long “wall” is made of vertical plastic strips that easily let people pass through to the other side. The Winnipeg Warming Huts event is an arts competition that sees various designers install their art works along a long stretch of the Red River Mutual Trail. The open-air architecture gallery is known for having a number of fun, avant-garde designs, but this year, Atelier ARI’s winning installation is speaking volumes about Trump’s hard-line immigration policies. Related: Trump will give architects just five days to submit proposals for a Mexican border wall Visually, Open Border ‘s bright orange strips are in stunning contrast to the snowy landscape, inviting curious visitors to walk through from one side to the other. Although fun in nature, the protest art installation makes reference to a seriousness of the worrisome xenophobic international policies being demonstrated not only by the USA’s current administration, but worldwide. “Creating a wall or border on a route is one the most radical and unnatural architectural statements one can make, which was something we liked a lot,” de Grauw and den Berg told Co.Design . “The moment we came up with the wall we realized this would be a political act as well, relating to the speeches of Trump, but also refugee problems in Europe. [It’s] something you can pass through and a place to gather and warm up.” The design was strategically crafted to make people contemplate the issue as they pass through the orange curtains. The semi-opaqueness of the PVC strips cause people to be indistinguishable as they pass through, a metaphorical statement on the equality of the entire human race. Atelier ARI explains the significance, “Everybody in the wall becomes dark-red silhouettes. Everybody becomes the same.” + Atelier ARI Via Lost at E Minor

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Donald Trump would probably hate this crossable border wall

SOM debuts “world’s largest 3D-printed polymer building” designed for off-grid living

January 28, 2016 by  
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World’s largest delta-style 3D printer can print nearly zero-cost housing out of mud

September 18, 2015 by  
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Drach and Ganchrow recreate ancient Paleolithic tools 3D printing

September 18, 2015 by  
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Chinese company ‘builds’ 3D-printed villa in less than 3 hours

July 22, 2015 by  
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SketchUp’s Open-Source 3D-Printable WikiHouse Snaps Together Like Lego Bricks

July 5, 2015 by  
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What if you could assemble your house like Legos using free modeling software and a 3D printer? That’s the idea behind Eric Schimelpfening ‘s WikiHouse – a home designed entirely in SketchUp that can be downloaded by anyone, customized to fit the user’s needs and sent to the 3D printer. The components are then snapped together using less than 100 screws to make rooms that can be rearranged as easily as you would rearrange furniture. Read the rest of SketchUp’s Open-Source 3D-Printable WikiHouse Snaps Together Like Lego Bricks Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3d printed home , 3D printed house , 3D printers , 3D printing , 3d-printed architecture , Eric Schimelpfening , google sketchup , green technology , maker faire , SketchThis.NET , WikiHouse , WikiHouse Google

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