This spellbinding icy blue throne was 3D-printed by robots

April 19, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This spellbinding icy blue throne was 3D-printed by robots

The robotically 3D-printed Voxel Chair 1.0 looks like it came straight out of a science fiction film. The futuristic mesh-like prototype was designed by Manuel Jimenez Garcia and Gilles Retsin , and manufactured using extruded PLA plastic through Robotic Additive Manufacturing Platform (RAMP), an innovative process that enables 3D printing of large-scale products with stunning detail and durability. The Voxel Chair, whose shape is inspired by the  Panton chair design, is the first prototype of its kind using new software that is specifically developed for robotic 3D printing. Unlike most 3D printing processes that use pre-defined forms, this innovative software – based on research by Manuel Jimenez Garcia and Gilles Retsin – allows for optimal control of thousands of line fragments. Related: Lilian van Daal creates a Biomimicry-inspired, 3D-printed chair Designed in collaboration with fabrication firms Nagami.Design and Vicente Soler, the chair was built out of transparent PLA, a non-toxic, biodegradable plastic that can be made out of various renewable resources like corn starch. Cyan-colored particles were mixed into the plastic to give the chair its unique glass-like appearance. The unique chair is just one example of how the RAMP process can be used to build stronger 3D-printed products . Considering the breakneck speed of advances in the field, unprecedented large-scale 3D objects are only a matter of time. The Voxel Chair 1.0 is currently on display at the Imprimer Le Monde in Centre Pompidou Paris. + Manuel Jimenez Garcia + Gilles Retsin Via Ignant Images via Manuel Jimenez Garcia, Gilles Retsin and Nagami.Design

Original post: 
This spellbinding icy blue throne was 3D-printed by robots

This crazy boot-shaped tiny house could only exist in Texas

April 19, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on This crazy boot-shaped tiny house could only exist in Texas

Only in Texas, people. This whimsical boot-shaped home may look like a quirky roadside stop, but it’s actually a fully functioning home available for rent . Designed and built by Dan Phillips of Phoenix Commotion – a firm that specializes in building affordable homes using reclaimed materials – the unique 2 bedroom, 1 bath home comes with custom features, a nice yard, and even a stunning rooftop deck “to boot”! The cowboy boot home, which is located in Huntsville, Texas, looks solitary from most angles, but it’s actually connected to a small tin-roofed bungalow with a wrap-around porch. The addition was added on to increase the total floorspace to a compact, but livable 711 square feet . Related: Beekeeper built dream hexagonal house without ‘hateful’ right angles Things are just as curious on the interior as they are outside. Dan Phillips has made a name for himself for building with whatever reclaimed materials he can find, and the cowboy boot house is no different. Throughout the home, the walls are clad in various wood pieces collected from other building sites. Shards of tiles make up the mosaic flooring, and parts of the ceiling are plastered in vintage record covers. The home has two bedrooms (one of which is accessed by ladder,) a single bathroom, and a kitchen clad in undulating metal sheets. A red spiral staircase leads to a rooftop deck located on the highest level of the boot. Although the boot home does have its roadside quality, the people behind the design, Phoenix Commotion, have more than just quirky homes in their portfolio. Since 1997, the company has constructed over 20 eco-friendly, affordable homes using reclaimed materials in the Huntsville area. All of their projects are built with help from future tenants, who tend to be low-income families. + Phoenix Commotion Via New Atlas Images via Har.com

Read the original post:
This crazy boot-shaped tiny house could only exist in Texas

Mak3D: World’s First 3D Printing Co-Working Space Opens in London

November 26, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Mak3D: World’s First 3D Printing Co-Working Space Opens in London

What do you do if you’re a designer with an amazing idea for a product, but no way to make it? There might a huge buzz around 3D printing , but we’re still a long way off from everyone having a machine at home. If you’re in London, you can head to Mak3d, the world’s first 3D printing co-working environment! Launched in August this year, Mak3d occupies a 1,000 square foot space on East London’s buzzing Brick Lane. Founded by Nick Allen of 3D printing bureau 3dprintuk, the Mak3d coworking space’s in-house equipment includes a 3D scanner and an Objet30 high definition 3D printer, which produces models from a resin called Vero White Plus. Allen noticed that though there were co-working spaces in London, most catered to individuals in the technology industry or computer-based designers, and there weren’t many spaces for makers that needed to make noise, and a maybe a bit of a mess. Individuals with ideas can come to the Mak3d space, and working from CAD files, sketches or even just a description, the concept can be turned into a physical model, either with the help of 3dprintuk’s designers, or if the person has the skills, they can do it themselves. 3D designers who rent desk space get access to the 3D scanner and reduced rates for printing. Current residents include a toy designer and jewelry designer Rob Elford , with room for more. Desk space for 3D designers starts at £200 a month, but there’s also the option of free workspace for designers skilled at 3D modelling who are willing to contribute 2 hours a week in work.

More:
Mak3D: World’s First 3D Printing Co-Working Space Opens in London

Conceptual Artists and Designers Push Boundaries of Design at London’s First 3D Print Show

October 31, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Conceptual Artists and Designers Push Boundaries of Design at London’s First 3D Print Show

Made from laser-sintered polyamide, Kinesis is a “wearable sculpture” by London- and Berlin-based Daniel Widrig that treats the body like a landscape, wrapping and undulating around its form. With a clear nod to the artist and designer’s training as an architect, including several years with Zaha Hadid Architects , the sculpture plays with the ideas of architecture, jewelry and fashion. The pieces were seamlessly created with selective laser sintering (SLS), in which a high-power laser fuses particles of powder (in this case polyamide) together to form a solid mass. Virtual City by Sang Un Jeon speaks to the way in which we interact with the real and virtual worlds. Even as we live more of our lives online, technologies like Google Earth allow us to explore physical places without ever leaving our computers. In Virtual City, a computer keyboard is the setting for a cityscape of 3D-printed buildings, with the keyboard letters corresponding to some of the Internet’s largest communities. The estimated unique monthly visitors of the websites determined the heights of the buildings. W is for Wikipedia. E is for eBay. We would have reserved I for Inhabitat, of course, but IMDB is pretty cool, too. Trained in studio pottery, artist Jonathan Keep pushes the boundaries of his medium with 3D-printed ceramics. The organic, coral-like shapes of the Random Growth series are inspired by the growth patterns of natural structures like stalactites or ant hills, which have an underlying logic paired with randomness. The artist scripted a generative algorithm that mimics the effect, and the code determines the shape of the pieces. A similar approach is used for Keep’s Sound Surfaces series, which consists of physical representations of digital music recordings. A pixel is coded in virtual space to spiral, with a three-dimensional computer mesh eventually forming the basic shape of the vase or vessel. Data from digitally recorded songs add texture to the virtual mesh, with the tone and rhythm determining the ultimate surface of the 3D-printed ceramic object. Keep taught himself how to code, seeing it as another form of making. Francesca Smith’s Memento recreates classic designs from the Victorian era with modern 3d-printing technology. Exploring the Victorian era’s attitudes toward rituals associated with mourning and contrasting them with our current day approach, she created a collection of jewelry that combines rapid-prototyped nylon hands with textiles and human hair. The juxtaposition of hard and soft materials is a recurring theme in her work. Michael Eden’s Bloom was eye-catching for both its neon hue and shape. The shape references antique ceramics and classic decorative forms, but it’s made through a process of additive layer manufacturing with a nylon material and a mineral soft coating. Eden, one of the early explorers of 3D printing’s potential for artwork, often marries traditional craft skills and digital technology, referencing Wedgwood ceramics in his pieces and working with unfired ceramic materials. He’s currently a research fellow at the Manchester Institute for Research and Innovation in Art and Design (MIRIAD) , where he conducts research on digital forming, including 3D printing. For SAVE AS , Israeli curator Maya Ben David called for designers from around the world to submit their impressions of the Arab Spring. Exploring the nature of collective memory and human experience, the collection includes five 3D-printed objects that embody the designers’ online experiences of the events. Tahrir Rolling by Dan Hochberg and Roi Vaspi Yanai incorporates a map of Cairo’s Tahrir Square on the surface of a rolling-pin, bringing together major events and daily needs. Fragile Desire by Munich-based Umur Sener uses connected Arabic patterns to create the shape of a Coca Cola bottle , a symbol of Western values. The curator believes that designers are the natural bridge between the digital and the physical. We spotted Matthew Plummer-Fernandez’s fantastic, pseudo-fractal 3D-printed bowls last month at the London Design Festival. For the 3D Print Show, he unveiled his stunningly colorful Digital Natives series, incorporating a print-in-color process and software 3D interface he developed himself. Everyday objects like watering cans, spray bottles and toys were 3D scanned using a digital camera, and then their shapes were distorted and abstracted, or remixed, according to various algorithms, rendering the forms almost unrecognizable. Plummer-Fernandez clearly remembers the first time he grasped 3D-printing’s infinite possibilities. He was reading “Infinite Music: Imagining the Next Millennium of Human Music-Making” by Adam Harper , and was struck the author’s description of the boundless nature of music — and realized that infinite potential also applied to 3D technology. Long heralded in tech and design circles as the ultimate tool for sustainable design and production, 3D printing seems to have exploded this year in the mainstream consciousness. Four thousand people attended the London show, exceeding organizers’ expectations. Held at The Brewery in Central London October 19-21 2012, the inaugural 3D Print Show included demonstrations and exhibitions from 3D printing services like i.materialise , as well as a whole area devoted to demonstrations of show partner MakerBot’s Replicator 2 desktop 3D printer . The 3D Print Show travels to Paris and New York before returning to London in 2013. + 3D Print Show Photos by Charlene Lam for Inhabitat

Originally posted here: 
Conceptual Artists and Designers Push Boundaries of Design at London’s First 3D Print Show

Nervous System’s Ethereal 3D-Printed LED Leaf Lamps Shine Light on Natural Design

May 20, 2012 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Nervous System’s Ethereal 3D-Printed LED Leaf Lamps Shine Light on Natural Design

Read the rest of Nervous System’s Ethereal 3D-Printed LED Leaf Lamps Shine Light on Natural Design Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3d printed design , 3D printed lamps , 3D printing , biomimicry , energy efficient lighting , green design , green interiors , green lighting , green products , icff 2012 , International Contemporary Furniture Fair , LED lamps , LED lighting , low energy lighting , Nervous System , sustainable design

View original here:
Nervous System’s Ethereal 3D-Printed LED Leaf Lamps Shine Light on Natural Design

Bad Behavior has blocked 1359 access attempts in the last 7 days.