ESA 3D prints extraterrestrial bricks with concentrated sunlight and moondust

May 4, 2017 by  
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The European Space Agency (ESA) is getting in on the 3D-printing fun with extraterrestrial materials. They used simulated lunar material and the sun’s heat to print bricks that are as strong as gypsum . Their project demonstrates how lunar explorers could one day use a similar method to construct Moon colonies. Future travelers to both the Moon and Mars could use locally-sourced materials to build habitats. Recently University of California, San Diego engineers funded by NASA were able to create super-strong bricks with simulated Mars dirt, and now ESA scientists have been able to use dust with similar composition and grain size as the material on the moon to 3D print bricks. Related: Scientists create super-strong bricks from Mars-like soil Materials engineer Advenit Makaya said they cooked successive layers of moondust 0.1 millimeters thick in a solar furnace at temperatures of 1,000 degrees Celsius – or 1,832 degrees Fahrenheit. The team can finish a 7.9 by 3.9 by 1.1 inch brick in about five hours. The solar furnace is located at the DLR German Aerospace Center , a place you may be familiar with because they recently built the world’s largest artificial sun . The bricks will now go through extensive mechanical testing. They’re not perfect yet; for example, some have warped at their edges because the center cools slower than the edges. Advenit said they’re looking into ways to manage the warping, “but for now this project is a proof of concept, showing that such a lunar construction method is indeed feasible.” The European Union’s Horizon 2020 program will back a follow-up project, RegoLight , which aims to develop 3D printing technology to shape lunar regolith, or the “loose layer of dust, soil, and broken rocks on the Moon surface.” Advenit said the recent ESA project occurred in normal atmospheric conditions, but RegoLight will attempt to 3D print with moondust in the high temperature extremes and vacuum conditions you’d find on the Moon. Via the European Space Agency Images via ESA – G. Porter and ESA/Foster + Partners

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ESA 3D prints extraterrestrial bricks with concentrated sunlight and moondust

Dubai-based firm to construct world’s first 3D-printed skyscraper

March 17, 2017 by  
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3D printing could soar to new heights with the construction of the first 3D-printed skyscraper in the world. Dubai -based firm Cazza recently announced they aim to print the high-rise in the United Arab Emirates . They will draw on a novel construction technique known as crane printing. To print their ambitious skyscraper, Cazza will draw on cranes with added units designed for constructing 3D-printed buildings higher than 262 feet. It’s not yet known how tall the skyscraper will be. The company’s CEO Chris Kelsey said when they started their company, they focused on 3D-printing low-rise structures or houses, but developers kept asking about skyscrapers, so they decided to adapt their technology to reach higher. Related: Three-mile-high futuristic skyscraper has a smog-eating, self-cleaning coating The crane printing process includes all the major structural components needed by towering buildings, according to Construction Week Online. Current construction methods will complete the rest of the building. Mechanical engineer Xavier Hernand said there are vast possibilities for what kind of materials they could use, including steel or concrete . Cazza Chief Operating Officer Fernando De Los Rios said, “The crane printing system can be easily adopted with existing cranes which means we don’t have to build cranes from scratch. We are adding new features to make it adaptable to high wind speeds along with the use of our layer smoothing system that creates completely flat surfaces. You won’t know it’s 3D printed.” Cazza gained notice for blending mobile 3D printing robots with existing building methods to speed up construction processes and make them more cost effective and environmentally friendly. Kelsey said, “Through our technologies, we will be able to build architecturally complex buildings at never-before-seen speeds. It is all about economies of scale where the initial high technology costs will reduce as we enter the mass production phase.” The company has not yet announced a start date for the skyscraper construction. + Cazza Via Construction Week Online Images via Pexels and Good Free Photos

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Dubai-based firm to construct world’s first 3D-printed skyscraper

BigDelta machine 3D-prints durable, affordable houses from dirt

July 19, 2016 by  
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Last year Italian company World’s Advanced Saving Project (WASP) debuted BigDelta, a 40-foot-tall 3D-printer that prints affordable, sustainable homes . Now they’re organizing workshops and inviting local makers to participate as they work towards printing their first Earth home in an Italian “technological village” called Shamballa . Constructed from a locally-sourced mix of dirt and straw, these ecological homes are notably “light and strong.”

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BigDelta machine 3D-prints durable, affordable houses from dirt

3D-printed eggs could radically change how conservationists monitor endangered species

April 5, 2016 by  
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When it comes to monitoring endangered species , the less invasive the method the better. Conservationists have used camera traps and drones to gain insight into wildlife populations, but flashes and buzzes can change animal behavior. Now scientists may have just developed a less obtrusive monitoring device: a 3D-printed egg equipped with sensors. Read the rest of 3D-printed eggs could radically change how conservationists monitor endangered species

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3D-printed eggs could radically change how conservationists monitor endangered species

iLab Haiti Relief Project 3D-Prints Direly Needed Medical Supplies On Demand

December 24, 2013 by  
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3D printing is great for homes because it can let you print just about any plastic object you crave. But in Haiti, which is still recovering from a devastating earthquake , the technology has a more urgent application: 3D-printing medical supplies on demand . Vital community resources in Haiti are still very often in low quantities or missing altogether, but the new iLab Haiti project aims to use 3D-printing to solve some of the country’s immediate medical needs. Read the rest of iLab Haiti Relief Project 3D-Prints Direly Needed Medical Supplies On Demand Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3d print , 3D printed humanity mission , 3D printed medical supplies , 3D printing , 3d printing relief project , advanced fabrication , Ashley Dara , Filabot , good will , green technology , Haiti Communitere , haiti earthquake , Haiti Earthquake relief , helping people , Humanity Projects , iLab Haiti , iLab Haiti 3D printed medical tools , KIDMob , makerbot , Makerbot Replicator , plastic , plastic printing , vital resources        

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iLab Haiti Relief Project 3D-Prints Direly Needed Medical Supplies On Demand

3D Systems ProJet 4500 Debuts Full Color Plastic 3D Printer with Built-in Recycling

December 9, 2013 by  
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3D Systems , a manufacturer of 3D printing solutions , just unveiled its new ProJet 4500 full-color plastic 3D printer . The company is calling it the world’s first and only continuous-tone full color 3D printer . What this means is that it’s able to produce 3D prints with a full range of colors that blend as seamlessly as a rainbow. What’s more, the printer also features integrated material recycling to cut down on wasted materials and usage. Read the rest of 3D Systems ProJet 4500 Debuts Full Color Plastic 3D Printer with Built-in Recycling Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3d print , 3D printing , 3d systems , 3D systems color 3D printing , 3D Systems ProJet 4500 , full color 3D printer , full color 3D printing , green gadgets , green technology , laser sintering , material recycling , ProJet 4500 , VisiJet C4 Spectrum materials        

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3D Systems ProJet 4500 Debuts Full Color Plastic 3D Printer with Built-in Recycling

Scientists 3D Print a Lithium-Ion Battery the Size of a Grain of Sand

June 20, 2013 by  
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As technology advances, gadgets and gizmos are becoming smaller and smaller. From medical devices to bee-sized robots , developments in engineering have made for incredibly tiny electronics. To accommodate these diminutive devices, researchers at Harvard University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have successfully 3D printed lithium-ion batteries the size of a grain of sand. They were able to use a printer to fabricate interlocking electrodes each about the width of a human hair. Their results have been published in the June 18 edition of Advanced Materials. Read the rest of Scientists 3D Print a Lithium-Ion Battery the Size of a Grain of Sand Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3d print , advanced materials , anode , cathode , electrode , harvard university , ink , jennifer lewis , lithium ion battery , microbattery , University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign        

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Scientists 3D Print a Lithium-Ion Battery the Size of a Grain of Sand

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