Scientists Bring Extinct Mouth-Brooding Frog Back to Life After 30 Years

March 18, 2013 by  
Filed under Green

Most of us probably thought the first species that would be brought back from extinction would be large, scaly, and wreak havoc on a theme park. While not nearly as intimidating, scientists have revived one of the most interesting amphibians the world has ever seen. Using preserved DNA, researchers at the University of Newcastle in Australia have resurrected the gastric-brooding frog (Rheobatrachus silus). The frog was native to small portions of Queensland, and was pushed out of existence by habitat loss , parasites, fungus and invasive weeds back in the 1980′s. Using cloning methods, the animal, which can amazingly incubate eggs in its stomach and give birth through its mouth, may soon be hopping back into the world. Read the rest of Scientists Bring Extinct Mouth-Brooding Frog Back to Life After 30 Years Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: australia , cloning , DNA , embryo , gastric-brooding frog , great-barred frog , long now foundation , mike archer , National Geographic Society , queensland , rheobatrachus silus , scnt , somatic cell nuclear transfer , sydney , tasmanian tiger , tedx deextinction , the lazarus project , University of New South Wales , university of newcastle , Washington DC , wooly mammoth

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Scientists Bring Extinct Mouth-Brooding Frog Back to Life After 30 Years

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