Sperry introduces shoes made with ocean plastic

March 27, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Undoubtedly, one of the world’s most pressing issues is the massive amount of plastic waste that is clogging our oceans and waterways on a daily basis. Thankfully, some companies are converting this ocean plastic into useful products for the everyday consumer. Already well-known for its attractive boat shoes, American footwear company Sperry has just launched Bionic, a new type of eco-friendly boat shoe that is made with textiles spun from ocean plastic. Dating back to 1935, Sperry is an American shoe line that specializes in stylish and durable boat shoes. Its shoes are beloved by professional and amateur sailors, who also have a front-row seat to the shocking amount of plastic waste that is suffocating our planet’s water systems. Related: New line of men’s swimwear is made from recycled ocean plastic Working under its motto of “Look Good. Do Good.”, the footwear company has just unveiled a new line of eco-friendly boat shoes that are made out of recycled plastic waste. Working in collaboration with the teams from Water Keeper Alliance and Bionic Yarn , Sperry created the new Bionics collection, which features various boat shoes that are made with fabric spun from recycled plastic bottles. Once the plastic waste is collected from marine and coastal environments, it is then sent to be turned into eco-friendly yarn and fabric. Each shoe has the same rugged structure as Sperry’s regular collections, but the Bionic boat shoes feature that eco-friendly twist. In fact, according to Sperry’s calculations, each pair of shoes is made out of the equivalent of five recycled plastic bottles. Each item in the collection varies in cost, ranging from $30 to $100 per pair, with a range of styles and colors to choose from for both adults and children. + Sperry Images via Sperry

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Sperry introduces shoes made with ocean plastic

MVRDV designs a sustainable urban living room for Shenzhen

March 27, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Dutch architecture firm MVRDV has unveiled its competition-winning designs for the Shimao ShenKong International Centre, a new “three-dimensional urban living room” for the heart of Shenzhen’s Longgang district. Selected from nearly 30 competition entries, the winning proposal, also known as the Shenzhen Terraces, will introduce over 20 programs to a thriving university neighborhood. The project also focuses on sustainability and will integrate passive design principles, native landscaping, recycled materials and solar panels.  Named after its architecture of stacked plateaus, the Shenzhen Terraces project references forms of the nearby mountains while its predominately horizontal lines and curvaceous shapes provide a visual contrast with the vertical lines and hard edges of the surrounding high-rises. The terraced design also creates opportunities for large overhangs to mitigate solar gain as well as spacious terraces filled with plants and water basins for cooling microclimates . Bridge elements link various buildings to create a continuous elevated route.  Related: ZHA unveils LEED Gold-targeted OPPO headquarters in Shenzhen “ Shenzhen has developed so quickly since its origins in the 1970s,” said Winy Maas, founding partner of MVRDV. “In cities like this, it is essential to carefully consider how public spaces and natural landscape can be integrated into the densifying cityscape. The urban living room of the Shimao ShenKong International Centre will be a wonderful example of this, and could become a model for the creation of key public spaces in New Town developments throughout Shenzhen. It aims to make an area that you want be outside, hang out and meet, even when it is hot — a literally cool space for the university district, where all communication space can be outside. It will truly be a public building.” As a sustainable hub, the 101,300-square-meter Shenzhen Terraces will be home to a pedestrian-friendly landscape, a bus terminal and a mixture of functions — such as an art gallery, library, conference center and outdoor theater — conveniently placed near high-rise housing, commercial complexes and educational facilities. The landscaping, designed in collaboration with Openfabric, will mimic the curvaceous architecture and will feature native sub-tropical plants and recreation zones.  + MVRDV Images by Atchain via MVRDV

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MVRDV designs a sustainable urban living room for Shenzhen

Everloops sustainable toothbrush comes with replaceable bamboo bristles

March 26, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Mexico City-based NOS has come out with a design to address one of the many causes of plastic pollution that consumers tend to overlook: toothbrushes. The company’s Everloop toothbrush combines a reusable, recycled plastic handle with replaceable bristles made from compostable bamboo . The sheer number of plastic toothbrushes that end up in landfills every year is a much larger problem than most people realize. Most dentists, as well as the American Dental Association (ADA), recommend replacing toothbrushes every three or four months or whenever the bristles begin to fray. Seeing as there are over 300 million people living in the United States, that means there are about 1 billion plastic toothbrushes tossed into the garbage every year in this country alone. Related: Tooth — the eco-friendly toothbrush made from recycled and biodegradable materials The plastic handles on typical toothbrushes are regularly found during beach cleanups, and the tiny nylon bristles have the potential to contribute to microplastics in the ocean. Some modern designs aim to take the plastic out of disposable toothbrushes and replace it with bamboo handles. This is a step in the right direction, but it still leaves the issue of regular pollution every three months when it’s time to replace the toothbrush, especially considering many bamboo toothbrushes still have nylon bristles. NOS aims to stop this endless toothbrush pollution with its unique redesign of the bristle component. The head and base of the Everloop toothbrush is made of recycled plastic from other discarded toothbrushes, with a clipping mechanism that easily opens and closes to replace the bristles (made entirely out of natural bamboo) when it’s time to change them. The disposed bamboo bristles are 100% compostable. Each toothbrush comes with a set of eight bamboo bristles to be replaced every three months, enough for at least two years. Even the packaging, made from thermoformed paper pulp, can be safely composted . + NOS Images via NOS

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Everloops sustainable toothbrush comes with replaceable bamboo bristles

Floating ICEBERG creatively confronts global warming

March 26, 2020 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

In summer 2019, a surprising sight popped up on a New Hampshire lake — ICEBERG, a floating, iceberg-shaped pavilion made of locally sourced wood and recycled plastic. Created to raise awareness on the issue of polar ice melt, the temporary installation was the work of  Bulot+Collins , an international architecture firm that guided over a hundred Beam Campers to build the project on-site. The environmental installation also doubled as a play space with a resting area for sunbathing and a staircase that leads to a diving platform.  ICEBERG was designed and built for  Beam Camp , a summer camp in Strafford, New Hampshire that teaches campers hands-on skills and creative thinking through large-scale collaborative projects selected through an annual worldwide design competition. In 2019, Bulot+Collins’ ICEBERG project was chosen and built in three weeks by 104 campers between the ages of 10 to 17.  Located in the middle of Willy Pond, the 700-square-foot ICEBERG pavilion features a slanted wood frame buoyed by a series of empty barrels. The structure is covered in locally sourced plywood panels clad in recycled HDPE tiles manufactured on-site by the campers with a process exclusively developed by the architects for the project. Recycled plastic was melted and molded into triangular shapes and then covered in a mix of resin and thermochromic paint to simulate the appearance of a melting iceberg : the hundreds of tiles turn from different shades of blue in the cold to a polar white in the heat.  Related: ICEBERGS immerse visitors in a beautiful underwater world in Washington, D.C. In addition to its striking visual appearance, ICEBERG served as a play space with a sunbathing area and a 10-foot-tall diving platform. “As architects accustomed to working in an environment where the designer, the client and the users are often three distinct parties, we were stimulated to have the future users play an active role in the building process of the project,” note the architects. “This blurring of boundaries familiarized campers with the subtle implications of building a space, and allowed them to evolve in a structure that they constructed with their own hands.” + Bulot+Collins Images via Bulot+Collins

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Floating ICEBERG creatively confronts global warming

Stunning home on Spanish island built partially underground

March 25, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Formentera-based  Marià Castelló Architecture  has become known for creating incredible homes that deftly combine contemporary design with nature-based inspiration. The firm’s latest project is the Bosc d’en Pep Ferrer, a family home that was partially built deep underground into the rocky terrain to use the landscape as natural insulation to  reduce its energy usage . Local architects have used the natural beauty of Spain’s Balearic islands as inspiration in their  home designs  for years. In addition to the spectacular scenery, the island’s Mediterranean climate allows designers to use several passive features to create energy-efficient buildings that blend into the natural landscape. Related: This earth-sheltered Australian hobbit home stays cozy all year Located in the beach town of Migjorn, the Bosc d’en Pep Ferrer was built on a rocky landscape overlooking the expansive coastal views. Although the terrain would be normally considered a challenge for any type of construction, the team from Marià Castelló Architects used the rocky topography to their advantage, “burying” part of the home deep underground. The underground floor of the home was created by digging an elongated cavity reminiscent of a stone quarry. The shape of the tunneled space is horizontal, which was strategic in providing a base to create several transversal walkways and hovering patios on the upper floors of the design. Walking up from the underground level, the home design features several indoor/outdoor spaces lined by  natural rock  as the main walkway leads up to the home’s main courtyard. The upper levels of the home, which sit perpendicular to its underground base, are comprised of three light modules in cubical volumes. These bright white cubes with large glass facades give the home an undeniable contemporary feel, but once inside the  light-filled space , an array of natural features speak to the home’s incredible setting. Throughout the open-plan living space, there are walls of sculpted rock, locally-sourced limestone, pine and fir wooden elements, recycled cotton panels and several more  natural materials.  Even the rocky gravel was saved from the excavation process to be repurposed into the outdoor spaces around the home. Using the landscape also allowed the home’s design to take advantage of several  bioclimatic passive systems that not only insulate the home, but add substantially to its energy efficiency. Additionally, the Bosc d’en Pep Ferrer is equipped with an integral rainwater collection system that reroutes, collects and filters rainwater for reuse. +  Marià Castelló Architecture Images via Marià Castelló

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Stunning home on Spanish island built partially underground

Luxury resort in Bali pays homage to traditional village design

March 25, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Already well-known for creating large-scale public works like eco-parks and museums, Dutch architectural practice OMA has added yet another stunning project to its impressive portfolio — a luxury resort in Seminyak, Bali. According to the architects, the inspiration behind the Desa Potato Head resort is the area’s traditional villages, and the resort’s layout recalls this through the use of traditional Balinese building techniques and reclaimed materials . Located on the beach, the beautiful eco-resort is unique in that it is not designed to be another luxurious but impersonal getaway, where tourists just lounge for hours, sipping on mixed drinks in the warm sunshine. Rather, the resort’s design is an architectural attempt to connect visitors to the local community’s traditions. Related: Reclaimed materials star in this surf villa with ocean views in Bali “The essence of Bali lies in the interaction between different cultures,” architect and OMA partner David Gianotten explained. “Our design for the Potato Head Studios offers both private guest rooms and facilities, and public spaces, to encourage exchange between different kinds of users, challenging the ubiquitous Balinese resort typology that paradoxically emphasizes hotel guests’ exclusive enjoyment, detached from the life of the local community.” As part of that strategy, the architects incorporated several traditional building techniques and materials into the resort’s construction. For example, the building’s elevated layout was inspired by the raised courtyards typically found throughout Indonesia. Made up of three large volumes, the complex is lifted off the ground by a series of thin columns. Guests can enjoy the spacious common areas that lead out to the beach or to the rooms via corridors of handmade breeze block walls that cast light and shadows in geometric patterns. Often used for celebrations and cultural events, this indoor/outdoor space is covered with extensive native vegetation , which creates a strong connection to Mother Nature. To take in the incredible views, guests can also make their way up to the massive rooftop terrace, which provides stunning, 360-degree views. With most of the work done by local craftsmen, much of the hotel consists of either recycled or reclaimed building materials. The cladding of the spacious courtyards and zigzagging walkways is comprised of cement casing and reclaimed wood boards. Additionally, local artisans handcrafted the resort’s woven ceilings from recycled plastic bottles . The private suites feature terrazzo flooring made from waste concrete. Decorations throughout the spaces include wood furnishings and artworks from various local artists. + Desa Potato Head + OMA Via Design Milk Photography by Kevin Mak via OMA

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Luxury resort in Bali pays homage to traditional village design

Adidas unveils lightweight hiking shoe made from ocean plastic

March 24, 2020 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Long-distance hiking never looked so comfortable thanks to Adidas’ new shoes made especially for adventure. The Terrex Free Hiker Parley shoes are constructed using a sustainable combination of the company’s Boost technology and Parley for the Oceans’ recycled plastic material. The shoes will form to the shape of the wearer’s feet while providing a sleek look to match almost every style. This is the first in Adidas’ Terrex Free Hiker collection to incorporate Parley Ocean Plastic yarn, which is made from upcycled plastic waste collected from coastal areas. Adidas is a founding member of Parley for the Oceans, a global network that helps raise awareness for the oceans by collaborating among mindful brands and environmental groups. Related: New line of men’s swimwear is made from recycled ocean plastic Adidas’ Boost technology offers energy-return cushioning, even on rocky surfaces, and the mid-cut profile with a rubber outsole provides an adaptable grip on every type of terrain. The company’s signature Primeknit fabric makes the shoes water-repellent, lightweight and form-fitting to hug all the right spots of your feet (almost like a sock). Don’t let the breathable material fool you — these kicks are just as equipped for comfortable, long-distance hiking as they are for normal, everyday wear. This allows consumers to go from the rugged outdoors to the city sidewalks and urban settings to natural landscapes without missing a beat. “We believe that through sport, we have the power to change lives, and our latest shoe in the Terrex collection does just that,” said Tim Janaway, general manager of Adidas Outdoor. “The Terrex Free Hiker Parley represents both sustainability and performance, empowering you to get outside and challenge yourself, without challenging the environment .” The men’s and women’s designs weigh just 400 grams and 340 grams, respectively, and will retail for $200. All of Adidas’ Parley products are made using a yarn material spun from discarded plastic pollution collected from coastal areas, such as the Maldives, by beach cleanups run by partner organizations. + Adidas Images via Adidas

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Adidas unveils lightweight hiking shoe made from ocean plastic

Coronavirus Reshapes Human Environmental Impacts, Showing That We Can, Too

March 24, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Eco Tech, Recycle

Ardent recyclers and conscious shoppers have long been told by … The post Coronavirus Reshapes Human Environmental Impacts, Showing That We Can, Too appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Coronavirus Reshapes Human Environmental Impacts, Showing That We Can, Too

The 10 best tiny homes in California

March 23, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

If you’re looking for some cool tiny home retreats to try out a more minimalist style of living or just looking for a serene vacation spot, well, California is definitely the place to be. We’ve scoured the beautiful coastal state for some of the best tiny homes in California. Take a look! Gorgeous tiny home thrives in the California sunshine Surf’s up in this gorgeous tiny home, which is designed to be both comfy and mobile. One of Canadian studio  Minimaliste’s most recent tiny home builds, the compact 331-square-foot structure was built to perform just as well in warm climates as it does in colder regions. The interior space, although compact, was strategically laid out to provide optimal space, including a cozy sleeping loft made possible by the home’s slanted roof. Related: 8 tiny homes built tough for off-grid living Converted school bus in Malibu Creek State Park This gorgeous glamping retreat is located near Malibu Creek State Park and promises incredible mountain views. The interior is spacious and sleeps up to four people comfortably. Although you’ll most likely enjoy this cozy interior, the outdoor space is what makes this skoolie so special. An open-air deck with ample seating and dining space is a wonderful area to take in the views over breakfast, lunch and dinner. The nearby hammock is a prime napping spot. Young couple build tiny home to avoid sky-high Bay Area housing prices It’s well-known that California’s Bay Area is one of the country’s — and the world’s — most expensive places to live. However, its also an idyllic area to put down roots, or wheels for that matter. When Nicolette and Michael decided to live in the Bay Area so that Michael could stay in college, they had an impossible time finding proper housing. Frustrated at price of housing, the ambitious couple decided to just build their own tiny home . The result is a stunning, 300-square-foot home on wheels that comes with a full kitchen, sleeping loft and even a reading nook. Off-grid eucalyptus tiny home radiates cool Californian vibes Another creation by Canada-based  Minimaliste Houses , the Eucalptus tiny home is a sight to behold. Built for a client who wanted to explore the California coast, the beautiful tiny home on wheels is optimized for off-grid fun. Besides its modern design, the 28-foot-long home is equipped with roof-top solar panels , tight thermal insulation and natural light, all of which contribute to the home’s self-sustenance. Try out tiny home living in San Francisco’s ‘Pavilion’ This tiny home retreat is a perfect place to enjoy the beautiful city of San Francisco. The Airbnb property is just 450 square feet, but its charming cottage-style design, made up of several recycled and repurposed materials , makes it feel so much bigger. The retreat sleeps up to two guests, who can make use of its many amenities such as a light-filled, glass-enclosed living space surrounded by a serene garden with a pond. Relax in this retreat with a hot tub in San Francisco If you’re looking for a tiny home experience in California that is guaranteed to bring a little tranquility to your life, check out this retreat in San Francisco. Located in a spacious backyard of the owner’s home, the minuscule studio sleeps two guests comfortably in its shed-like space. The interior is compact, with just one room fitting in the bedroom, living room, kitchen and bathroom. But, the biggest draw to this retreat is its outdoor space. The home is surrounded by an open-air hardwood deck with a two-person hot tub. Built around a 700-year-old redwood tree that offers as much of a romantic touch as it does shade, the rental also boasts an outdoor shower, where you can bathe under the stars. The ‘Nugget’ in Costa Mesa takes tiny home living back to basics Located just a 10-minute drive to the beach, this beautiful tiny home in Costa Mesa is the perfect place to recharge your batteries. Although it is just 140 square feet, the retreat sleeps up to two guests comfortably. With its large sliding glass door entryway, the home boasts a minimalist feel that makes it just as perfect for a business trip as it does for a relaxing stay at the beach. A private deck wraps around the home and is shaded by bamboo trees. Tiny home getaway near San Diego These days, many travelers are forgoing the excessive displays of luxury in fancy hotels for simpler getaways. Tiny home retreats, like this gorgeous cabin-inspired tiny home near San Diego, offer guests a chance to relax and reconnect with nature. Located near beautiful Mount Laguna, the tiny home sleeps up to four people between a double bed and two sofa beds. Although the living space is more than sufficient, it is the outdoor area that is so special. The glamping retreat is completely immersed in nature, and features a rooftop terrace for guests to take in a bit of stargazing before enjoying a toasty nightcap around the private fire pit. Vintage glamping travel trailer in San Fernando Valley If there’s one iconic image that encompasses California adventure, it’s the gleaming vintage travel trailer, like this 1954 trailer just outside of Los Angeles. The trailer itself sleeps up to four and has a lovely interior. The magic really begins with the outdoor space, which features a covered deck with a romantic canopied double bed, perfect for sleeping under the stars during the long summer months. Additionally, guests can enjoy the incredible views of the San Fernando Valley from the adjacent outdoor lounge space. Off-grid tiny home in southern California Sometimes, you just need to get away from the hustle and bustle. For those times, this off-grid tiny home in Southern California will do the trick. The compact studio is outfitted with a plush, queen-sized bed. The space is tiny, but as an extra bonus, the home features a custom, garage door-style window that can be fully opened to enjoy amazing views of the 20 acres of beautiful private land that surround the tiny home retreat. Images via Minimaliste, Airbnb and Glamping Hub

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The 10 best tiny homes in California

Goodyear reCharge tire concept targets sustainability

March 20, 2020 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Goodyear tire company has a history of innovation with products like the  living moss tire that cleans the air as you drive  and  crazy spherical tires . Their newest concept could see a self-regenerating tire with customized capsules that renew your tire and allow it to adapt to varying mobility needs. “Goodyear wants the tire to be an even more powerful contributor to answering consumers’ specific mobility needs,” said Mike Rytokoski, Vice-President and Chief Marketing Officer of Goodyear Europe. “It was with that ambition that we set out to create a concept tire primed for the future of personalized and convenient electric mobility.” Related: These stylish, work-appropriate loafers are made with recycled tires The concept incorporates three main goals: provide a personalized experience,  manufacture the tires sustainably  and make the tires hassle-free for the consumer. To reach these goals, the concept tire offers a reloadable and biodegradable tread compound. This means each tire tread can be recharged with individual capsules. With the ability to regrow tire tread, the Goodyear reCharge can adapt to changing road conditions and your driving style. That might include extra cornering strength, protection on gravel, or variances in surface moisture such as rain and snow. The concept personalizes even further with the use of artificial intelligence that creates a driver profile and a customized liquid compound tailored to each individual’s driving style. For the sustainability portion, the tire will be made from biological material and reinforced by one of the strongest naturally-occurring fibers in  nature — spider silk. Not only is spider silk durable, but since it is a natural fiber, it is also 100% biodegradable. The liquid-capsule concept was created to provide hassle-free tire replacements. The frame has a “tall-and-narrow” shape and is lightweight so pressure maintenance or downtime related to punctures is less of a concern. “The Goodyear reCharge is a concept tire without compromise, supporting personalized, sustainable and hassle-free electric mobility,” said Sebastien Fontaine, Lead Designer at the Goodyear Innovation Centre in Luxembourg. + Goodyear  Images via Goodyear 

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Goodyear reCharge tire concept targets sustainability

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