How using 3D-printed foam can cut down concrete waste

January 25, 2022 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

The construction industry is highly unsustainable. In fact, 7% of global CO2 emissions result from cement production alone. In an effort to cut down construction-related carbon emissions, researchers in the Digital Building Technologies (DBT) department at ETH Zürich have created FoamWork. The project examines how foam 3D printing (F3DP) can be used in conjunction with concrete casting. The outcome is a less labor-intensive system that enhances material efficiency and lowers carbon emissions. Currently, cast-concrete structural elements use excessive material. Occasionally, engineers use hollow plastic forms to reduce concrete in standard slabs. For more complex systems, casting molds are made from timber or CNC-carved dense plastic foam. These labor-intensive systems overuse concrete or produce excessive waste from off-cuts. Conversely, using F3DP shapes within cast concrete formwork can save up to 70% of concrete, are significantly lighter and well-insulated. Related: New eco-friendly, decomposing construction foam unveiled A slab prototype by the DBT team shows how versatile it is to combine concrete structures and 3D-printed foam . The slab uses ribs derived from isostatic lines, which indicate the directions of compression and tension. Based on the principal stress pattern, the geometry of this slab has 24 cavities for foam inserts of 12 different shapes. For the foam production, ETH Zürich has collaborated with FenX AG, a company that uses mineral waste to produce high-performance building insulation. A robotic arm fabricates the foam components using recycled fly ash, the waste from coal-fired power stations. The foam components are arranged in timber formwork before poured in ultra-high-performance fiber-reinforced concrete (UHPFRC) to cast the structural element. Once the concrete cures, the foam pieces can either be left in for their insulative properties, or the raw material can be recycled and reprinted for other FoamWork projects. This process can be replicated for other standardized or more intricate concrete structural elements. Calculating the principal stress patterns can be used to design and fabricate various material-efficient structural elements. These can range from standardized elements to customized slabs and walls. Since there are no off-cuts created in using FoamWork, the whole fabrication system has the potential to be zero-waste . Alongside minimizing material waste, the lighter masses of the structural elements allow for easy transportation, handling and assembly on construction sites. + Digital Building Technologies, ETH Zürich Photography by Patrick Bedarf

Excerpt from:
How using 3D-printed foam can cut down concrete waste

Latest Adidas shoe uses upcycled materials to avoid waste

January 25, 2022 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Adidas has introduced a new hiking and athletic shoe in its TERREX line of apparel. The Nothing Left Behind Free Hiker Gore-Tex shoe is an ankle-supporting athletic shoe in sophisticated colors for the sustainably-minded hiker. It’s the latest in a growing movement for sustainable footwear. The Adidas TERREX Nothing Left Behind Free Hiker Gore-Tex shoes are the newest in the brand’s line of eco-conscious hiking shoes . They are part of the brand’s push for a more sustainable future and an end to plastic waste. The new shoes feature an upcycled upper with a breathable Gore-Tex waterproof membrane and Three Stripes Boost technology with responsive cushioning that provides bounce-back energy return as you walk. Continental-brand rubber outsoles and midsoles work together to provide traction on any surface. Related: Adidas 100% recycled jacket is solving plastic pollution Between the shoe’s fun colors and cool style, you would never guess it’s made of upcycled parts. The color palette is subtle but sporty, including muted red, pink, orange, green and blue details along with the classic gray Adidas stripes on the outside. Meanwhile, the upcycled parts use leftover materials from past product drops. “Through an innovative program that upcycles leftover premium materials within our supply chain, we are able to create and unveil the latest version of the Free Hiker model for the very first time,” said Michael Kadous, Head of North America, Adidas Outdoor, Terrex and Five Ten. “The varying materials used through this method produces a truly unique silhouette for shoe collectors and aficionados worldwide. ‘Nothing Left Behind’ reinforces Adidas’ ethos and commitment to exploring all avenues towards becoming one of the most sustainable performance brands.” Currently, The Nothing Left Behind Free Hiker Gore-Tex shoe is only available to Creators Club members and retails for $225. Buyers seem to be loving the shoes, with one reviewer even praising them for their comfort and ankle support. + Adidas Images via Adidas

Read more from the original source:
Latest Adidas shoe uses upcycled materials to avoid waste

Precycling Helps Shoppers Save

January 25, 2022 by  
Filed under Eco, Recycle

Resolving to be a better recycler is a great New Year’s resolution. But there’s an… The post Precycling Helps Shoppers Save appeared first on Earth911.

Read the original:
Precycling Helps Shoppers Save

Plant Prefab aims to make housing accessible and affordable

January 24, 2022 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Between impact on the land, use of resources , construction waste and effects on air quality, the building and maintenance of homes and businesses accounts for nearly 40% of carbon emissions on the planet. Plant Prefab setting out to change all that.  The concept behind Plant Prefab is prefabricated homes. It’s a process the construction industry has leaned into for a variety of reasons, including the fact that prefabbed buildings require less materials and create substantially less waste . Working from this base of knowledge, Plant Prefab builds custom multi-family or single-family homes from any architectural design.  Related: These prefabricated tiny homes are earthquake- and fire-resistant This in-house building system addresses many environmental and industry-specific issues. One is the shortage of skilled labor in the construction field. Efficiency in the plant means less labor is required. The process is also cost effective by streamlining material and labor expenses.  The hybrid modular model of building panels equates to short project timelines, 20% to 50% faster than a standard build. The process is flexible, so it can cater to endless combinations of low or high volume real estate developments at a 10% 25% cost savings and up to 30% less waste. When in full swing, the company anticipates being able to produce around 900,000 square feet of living space per year, equivalent to 800 dwelling units. Currently, the company is catering to custom builds, but they are working to scale the process to serve a breadth of customers across all price points, becoming a solution for the housing crisis across the U.S. The company’s third plant will break ground this month. It will be located on 17 acres in the Tejon Ranch Commerce Center, 25 miles south of Bakersfield, California . The innovative automated system will guide the business towards achieving these goals, with production starting in about a year. “The launch of our hub is a critical milestone in Plant Prefab’s broader mission to make architectural, sustainable housing more accessible, as it allows us to expand our capabilities from single-family and small multifamily housing into high-volume, large-scale developments – including student, affordable and market-rate housing for real estate, hospitality and corporate developers,” said Steve Glenn, founder and CEO of Plant Prefab. Plant Prefab is the first Certified B Corporation building technology company dedicated to sustainable design, materials and operations. The new hub echoes sustainability goals with efficient systems to minimize water use and energy consumption. Energy-efficient lighting, appliances and mechanical systems ensure low-usage requirements. The plant will also rely on solar power for energy production. Plant Prefab has announced a goal to achieve carbon-neutral operations by 2028. The homes produced in the Plant Prefab factories are held to an equally high sustainable building standard. Materials are selected for occupant and environmental health such as wool-based insulation and recycled drywall, as well as zero-VOC paints, stains and sealants.  + The Brown Studio and Plant Prefab Images via Plant Prefab

View post: 
Plant Prefab aims to make housing accessible and affordable

19th century Harlem house restored to be energy efficient

January 21, 2022 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

A 19th-century house, owners interested in passive house design and an architectural firm came together with a resulting blend of original elements married to modern innovations in a big-city row house. MESH Architectures led the design for this original Brownstone building in New York City . While the façade looks like others in the Harlem area, it’s been restored bottom to top. Walls and roofing are air sealed and insulated with ample blown-in cellulose insulation for energy efficiency . Related: The United States’ first Passive Plus House generates nearly all the energy it needs Inside, the cellar was converted into a home gym and media area. The main floor houses the kitchen and dining room that open into the back patio space. One floor up, the parlor level features the living room and library . The master bedroom and home office/guest room are located on the third floor, with four bedrooms on the fourth floor.  Each level was modernized with innovative HVAC systems that constantly filter air to provide fresh air for the residents. The systems are ultra energy-efficient, leaving behind a minimal environmental footprint.  Although brought up to date in terms of passive design standards, the team put significant effort into retaining elements of the original 1800s era home. The process involved repairing the extensive original woodwork around the windows, doors, stairs and fireplaces, while updating the home at the same time.  The hybrid interior design is seen throughout the space with fixtures that are a blend of new and historical. While the kitchen was completely remodeled for the modern era, some doors were recycled by relocating them in order to salvage them.  “This house is an integration of old and new. It is airy and clean, and it responds directly to the needs of a modern urban family,” said MESH Principal Eric Liftin. “We emphasized the social space of the kitchen/dining room/yard, while making a special effort to preserve the historical elements of the house. The house is full of recent building science technology, yet it feels like a serene, historic Harlem row house. We were happy to learn that the clients had already learned about passive house construction before we met them.” Although a row house by design, the retrofitting of energy-efficient technology stands as an example of what’s possible for home renovations in the name of zero-emission futures for both existing and new architecture.  + MESH Architectures  Photography by Frank Oudeman 

Read more:
19th century Harlem house restored to be energy efficient

What is wishcycling? Two waste experts explain

January 21, 2022 by  
Filed under Business, Green, Recycle

The gist: Just because you wish to recycle something doesn’t mean that you can.

Read the original here:
What is wishcycling? Two waste experts explain

Indoor-outdoor living drives this design for VAVA House

January 20, 2022 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Architecture takes a variety of forms and serves many purposes, but most people would agree that the best home is one that meets the family’s needs and lifestyle goals. To this end, VAVA House was designed to emphasize indoor-outdoor living through shared space and a connection to the outdoors.  Designed by Fivedot Architects, this Seattle , Washington home caters to the client’s desire for a space that reinforces family connection within the home and community relationships outside the home. Unlike most residential homes that open into the backyard, VAVA House opens outdoor living into the front yard where it can be shared with neighbors.  Related: Brutalist home in Puerto Rico is resistant to weather Inside, cozy coves beneath the staircase and in a narrow TV viewing area provide space for reflection and relaxation. Larger areas are equipped for group gatherings, whether that be family , neighbors or friends. In all, the house features four bedrooms, three bathrooms, an open floor plan throughout the main living area, a home gym, lounge, office and bonus room in a 3,643-square-foot space.  Out front, the home features an expansive patio with gathering areas, a custom-made wood swing, and heat sources such as a firepit and heater for year-round entertaining. The swing incorporates  recycled  roof joists from the previous home and souvenir hardware the clients brought back from India.  Plants  and landscaping surround the home, including a green roof and beds along the front yard and street. The theme continues with a custom plant rack for hydroponic growing. Previous concrete on-site is fashioned into the design to minimize water runoff and waste. Extensive solar panels produce renewable energy for the home. Fun, custom additions adorn the home. Prints of the children’s first steps are imprinted into the floor, and mural prints by Mario de Miranda decorate the walls. + Fivedot Images via Mark Woods

See the rest here:
Indoor-outdoor living drives this design for VAVA House

Energy efficient bamboo device in Vietnam is a cooling system

January 20, 2022 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

AREP, a multidisciplinary architecture agency, created a cooling system prototype based on the history, culture and original designs used by ancient civilizations. Called an adiabatic urban cooling system, the idea dates back centuries, yet is still perhaps the most natural solution for the challenges of cooling modern Vietnamese cities facing regular heat waves. The adiabatic urban cooling system relies on the copious amounts of water throughout Hanoi. At a local level, the system works to naturally cool the air through an evaporation process. It’s energy-efficient since there’s no energy required to implement the adiabatic principle.  Related: LEGO to build its first carbon neutral factory in Vietnam   It’s also a frugal solution to cool the cities and public areas without a need for energy production or the use of polluting refrigerants like those in air conditioning units. All that’s needed is fresh water and hot air — two things Vietnam has in natural abundance. The cultural relevance of the adiabatic technique goes beyond the system itself. It has a unique update that supports local artisans and incorporates another resource Vietnam has an abundance of — bamboo .  In addition to agriculture and fishing, Vietnam supports a bustling arts and crafts industry. Villages scattered throughout the region have developed specialization in bamboo, pottery, textile and even recycled beer glass techniques. For AREP’s prototype, the team met and worked with local families to develop a system that could be built by locals.  They initially experimented with glass, but found glass to be fragile and unsafe. In the end, they turned to bamboo for the main structure. The marriage of AREP’s modern take on an ancient process with traditional handicrafts in the region became a viable, low-tech and energy-efficient solution for cooling down the city’s outdoor spaces.  + AREP Images via AREP Vietnam

Continued here:
Energy efficient bamboo device in Vietnam is a cooling system

Green roofs top Marmormolen’s sustainable timber architecture

January 17, 2022 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

The timber design for Copenhagen’s upcoming large commercial building Marmormolen shows sustainable architecture leadership from designers Henning Larson and Ramboll. Lush with green roofs , a waterfront garden and more, the project shows what a commercial building can be to a community. Marmormolen, which will break ground in 2022 and open in 2024, was created to be a combination retail, office and public programming space. It will be one of the largest contemporary wood structures in Denmark . The building integrates into the innovative district of the Nordhavn waterfront, which has replaced a traditionally industrial neighborhood with a residential and tech district complete with self-driving bus test routes and recycled brick buildings. Related: University under a hill in India has a green roof Marmormolen features an open green plaza out front to welcome visitors and includes lush rooftop gardens and promenades. The building blends seamlessly with the waterfront via a park that extends to the water. Marmormolen measures 28,000 square meters with eight stories and is primarily being built for the AP Pension company. “Today, it is imperative that architecture challenges our usual notion of structures and materials,” said Soren Ollgaard, Partner and Design Director at Henning Larsen. “The construction industry is a major emitter of CO2, and we therefore also have great opportunities to make things better.” Henning Larsen is collaborating with AP Pension to prioritize the U.N.’s Sustainable Development Goals in creating the building. Green urban space surrounds Marmormolen on three sides. The building has a full height of eight stories on the street side where train tracks cross, stepping down to three stories toward housing on the opposite side. This is possible because the building is built of cubes with individual rooftops featuring terraces, gardens, butterfly houses and beehives. The rooftop can even produce vegetables for the cafeteria. “Workplaces used to be very interior and exclusive, but people today want to feel they are a part of a more diverse community and open up to their surroundings. With Marmormolen we want to create more than a great office building, we also want it to give something back to the city and makes the building come alive – even outside office hours,” said Mikkel Eskildsen, Associate Design Director and Lead Design Architect on the project. The ground floor will house an auditorium, various markets and public meeting spaces. On upper, more private levels, workplaces enjoy views of the city skyline and the sea. A large courtyard tops the center of the building with planted gardens. + Henning Larsen and Ramboll Images via Henning Larsen and Ramboll

Here is the original post:
Green roofs top Marmormolen’s sustainable timber architecture

Urwahn Platzhirsch e-bike wins major sustainability award

January 14, 2022 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

German bike maker Urwahn has received the German Sustainability Award 2022, Europe’s biggest award for social and ecological commitment to helping the planet, for its E-Bike Platzhirsch. The Platzhirsch is a 3D-printed steel electric bike with a gorgeous matte frame. The award honors groundbreaking contributions toward a sustainable future and boosts Urwahn’s efforts to create fair conditions for people and the environment. The jury for the German Sustainability Award is comprised of leaders in the fields of design and sustainability. The E-Bike Platzhirsch was given the award this year for its steel frame, which is featured on all Urwahn bikes. The idea is that steel provides longevity as it can be repaired and recycled better than carbon or aluminum, thus reducing waste and promoting a circular economy. Related: CAKE announces new :work series of mopeds and e-bikes The E-Bike Platzhirsch has 250 watts of power, producing 40 Nm torque and up to 25 km/h support from the electric motor. This produces a range of 208 Wh, making it a great urban commuter bike . All cables are routed inside the frame, giving it a sleek and modern look. Urwahn runs short production cycles and focuses on regional sales to further reduce production waste and extra carbon from shipping. Every Urwahn e-bike is created according to the principles of lean production, on-demand, and just-in-time. CEO and Urwahn founder Sebastian Meinecke explained, “Sustainability plays a central role for us and goes far beyond production. People are always at the center of everything we do. For this reason, we have conspired to ultra individualization in order to be able to consider the needs for design , function and safety on a whole level. In addition, we pay all people involved in the value creation fairly, pay attention to regulated working hours and preserve health protection.” + Urwahn Bikes Images via Urwahn Bikes

Read the original post:
Urwahn Platzhirsch e-bike wins major sustainability award

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 8183 access attempts in the last 7 days.