This brilliant project turns plastic waste into 3D-printed benches for Amsterdam

November 21, 2017 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Rotterdam-based studio The New Raw is rallying citizens to turn their household plastic waste into stylish public furniture. Their “Print Your City!” initiative combines 3D printing with recycling to re-design urban space. The first prototype to come out of this call to action is the XXX bench, designed for the Municipality of Amsterdam. According to recent reports, Amsterdam residents generate 23 kg of plastic waste per person annually. Rotterdam-based studio The New Raw has worked out that this amounts to enough plastic to build one bench for every two Amsterdammers every year. The team collaborated with Aectual to 3D-print their first piece of 100% recycled furniture, the XXX bench. Related: World’s First Wrench 3D-Printed with Recycled Ocean Plastic Wins Innovation Award The XXX bench seats two to four people and takes the form of a double-sided rocking chair. The balance required for it to function makes a statement on working together to close the cycle for plastic. Print Your City! was kick-started in 2016 as part of the AMS Institute’s Circular City Program and it’s supported by TU Delft and AEB Amsterdam. + The New Raw + Aectual

Original post: 
This brilliant project turns plastic waste into 3D-printed benches for Amsterdam

Beautiful Northcote Solar Home shows off modern energy-efficient family living

November 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Sustainable design principles are embedded throughout the Northcote Solar Home, a beautiful Melbourne home that shows how energy efficiency can go hand-in-hand with contemporary design. Local architecture studio Green Sheep Collective designed the light-filled home for a family who wanted flexible spaces and an emphasis on indoor-outdoor living. The sustainable, passive solar home is strategically positioned for thermal mass, while elements like double-glazing and rainwater harvesting reduce its energy footprint. Topped by an eye-catching raked corrugated zincalume roof, the Northcote Solar Home’s pitched roofline and clerestory windows help to modulate solar gain, while allowing for stack ventilation. North-facing living areas take advantage of passive heating and cooling, and high levels of insulation helps lock in desired temperatures. Large low-e, double-glazed windows frame the outdoors and bring in ample natural light. Views to the central courtyard and garden can be enjoyed throughout the home. Related: Swanky laneway house in Melbourne is built from recycled red brick The airy interior features white plaster walls and wormy chestnut flooring that flow from the inside to the outside decking and also tie into the silvertop ash exterior cladding. Large sliding doors delineate the three bedrooms from the living and dining areas, and are set up so for easy adaptation into different uses. “In addition, the courtyard affords great connectivity between spaces within the home, so while inhabitants might be undertaking separate activities, they may still be ‘together’,” wrote the architects. + Green Sheep Collective Images via Emma Cross

See the original post:
Beautiful Northcote Solar Home shows off modern energy-efficient family living

Son builds modern dream cabin from recycled materials for his aging father

November 17, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Retiring to a cozy cabin in the woods is a dream of many, and one that Josh Wynne helped his father fulfill when he built and designed Mike’s Hammock, a compact dwelling located on his property in Nokomis, Florida. Designed for handicap accessibility, the modern one-room was crafted for aging in place and prioritizes sustainability in its use of recycled materials and low-energy footprint. Stylish and sustainable, the 604-square-meter cabin was constructed with mostly local and recycled materials , including the Southern yellow pine salvaged from a nearby construction site. The careful use of resources resulted in less than one dumpster of waste for the project. To minimize site impact , Josh cantilevered the home above its foundation and planted three trees in place of the one he needed to remove. A custom-made central cooling and heating system helps reduce energy costs to an average of only $25 per month, even in summer, Wynne told New Atlas. Related: This cozy off-grid cabin shows beauty on a budget in upstate New York The facade is clad in vertically oriented corrugated metal siding to match the neighboring barn, while the interior is lined with Southern Yellow Pine that runs horizontally through the structure. The timber’s seamless lines, coupled with the large glazed sliding doors that frame outdoor views, gives the illusion of spaciousness. The small size of the home, as well as the layout and wheel-chair accessible features, cater to his father’s limited mobility without compromising aesthetics. + Josh Wynne Construction Via New Atlas

More here:
Son builds modern dream cabin from recycled materials for his aging father

Recycled materials make up this quirky solar-powered hotel in West Africa

November 17, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

A beautiful sun-soaked retreat on Cape Verde’s island of Sao Vicente prides itself on sustainability. Ramos Castellano Arquitectos designed the Terra Lodge Hotel using recycled and found materials, water recycling systems, and a rooftop solar array . The hotel draws the eye with its gridded timber frame, constructed from unfinished African wood, that partially encloses private verandas. Built predominately from lime-plastered concrete, the Terra Lodge Hotel’s five structures are rotated to optimize views and cross breezes. The hotel includes 12 rooms and a suite, a breakfast room, a lap pool, and a large outdoor terrace on the roof of an old green colonial house that now houses the owner’s tourist agency. The architects used found materials in construction, such as the recycled metals from petroleum barrels for the gate and the locally sourced rocks for the walls. Related: Hotel Shabby Shabby: Pop-Up Hotel Offers Recycled Rooms Built for Under €250 “Every solution is simplified adapting to the island lack of material and resources, simple and essential for satisfying basic needings, not for ephemeral fashion,” wrote the architects. “Almost everything is handmade, employing people from the neighborhood, from the floor finishing to the furniture, trying to distribute the economy of the building construction in the social environment.” The architects also designed the furnishings and light systems with locally handcrafted and recycled wood. + Ramos Castellano Arquitectos Via ArchDaily Images © Sergio Pirrone

Go here to read the rest: 
Recycled materials make up this quirky solar-powered hotel in West Africa

Inspiring youth village for orphans generates solar power for nearly 10% of Rwanda

November 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

More than one million people in a population of over 11 million in Rwanda are orphans . After hearing about this crisis, couple Anne Heyman and Seth Merrin started the Agahozo-Shalom Youth Village (ASYV) to offer a safe community and four-year high school education for at-risk orphans. Today, over 500 teenagers from across Rwanda’s 30 districts call the youth village home — and an on-site solar plant provides clean energy to other parts of the country. After hearing about Rwanda’s orphan crisis, Heyman was reminded of youth villages Israel constructed to house children orphaned after the Holocaust. The couple began ASYV to help teenagers specifically, as they knew of several organizations already working to care for orphaned babies. On 144 acres, hundreds of teenagers now receive an education and a family. Related: This modular orphanage in Thailand was built using local and recycled materials ASYV organizes students into families. Each group has a mama, a Rwandan educator who resides in a house with the teens, and a big brother or big sister or Rwandan guidance counselor who visits once a week. They also have a cousin, a foreign volunteer who comes for a year. ASYV recruits teenagers from around the country, taking in 125 every year. A village Health and Wellness Center provides medical and mental care, with health education on topics like HIV/AIDS, malaria prevention, and diet. Life Enrichment Applied Programs allow students to get involved in athletics or the arts. A farm , where students can get hands-on farming experience, provides around 30 percent of the village’s food. There’s even a 8.5-megawatt solar plant on village grounds. According to ASYV, “It is the first sub-Saharan grid-connected solar project, and provides electricity to nearly 10 percent of Rwanda.” Students of mixed ethnicities live together, as the youth village hopes to express reconciliation in Rwanda. One student, who asked to remain nameless, told National Geographic, “Of course, I know that some of my brothers are born from parents who could have been killers in the genocide. But why should we punish them for crimes they did not commit? I don’t want to know what their parents did. I only see them as my brothers and sisters.” Ten years in, graduates of the youth village have gone on to higher education at universities like Brown University or the University of Pennsylvania. Student Emmanuel Nkund’unkundiye, at ASYV’s first graduation ceremony, said, “Many people call us orphans but this time we are no longer orphans, we have a home.” Check out ASYV’s website for more information on the community, or on how to get involved . + Agahozo-Shalom Youth Village Via National Geographic Images via Agahozo-Shalom Youth Village Facebook

Continued here: 
Inspiring youth village for orphans generates solar power for nearly 10% of Rwanda

Historic French building stuffed with plastic bags looks ready to explode

November 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

A shockingly large number of plastic bags appeared to fill a historic stone building to near bursting in Bordeaux last month. The eye-catching installation is the most recent work of Luzinterruptus , a design collective famous for raising environmental awareness with plastic art installations. Created for the FAB Festival de Bourdeaux, the temporary artwork, titled The Plastic We Live With, turned into a light installation at night evocative of illuminated stained glass. Inspired by France’s ban of single-use plastic bags passed last year, The Plastic We Live With draws attention to the staggering amount of plastic waste in the world. “The idea was to graphically visualize, in a way that could be understood by all, the plastic excess that is around us, a recurrent subject in our work and in life, since practically everything we consume is either made with this material or it is wrapped in it or we are eating it in small particles in the meat and the fish we ingest,” Luzinterruptus wrote. Related: PlasticWaste Labyrinth is a stunning look inside our plastic waste problem The team, aided by 30 volunteers from the Asociacion Bénévoles en Action, collected thousands of plastic bags and recycled plastic for months from the city stores and warehouses. The bags were assembled in the openings of the building’s facade and lit from behind at night. The installation was on view for four days, after which the plastic was taken down and recycled with the building returned to its original condition. + Luzinterruptus Images via Lola Martínez

Go here to see the original: 
Historic French building stuffed with plastic bags looks ready to explode

Avoiding the Watery Grave: How to Recycle Fiberglass Boats

November 14, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Eco Tech, Recycle

Boating is a major industry in the U.S., with millions … The post Avoiding the Watery Grave: How to Recycle Fiberglass Boats appeared first on Earth911.com.

Read more from the original source:
Avoiding the Watery Grave: How to Recycle Fiberglass Boats

Yves Bhar recycles wetsuits and boat sails into ocean-friendly bags

November 9, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Yves Béhar is turning trash into treasure. The rock-star industrial designer, founder of the San Francisco-based firm Fuse Project , has teamed up with Mafia Bags to transform used wetsuits, recycled boat sails, and castoff climbing ropes from the Yosemite Valley into an “everyday urban adventure pack.” Even better, the proceeds benefit  Sustainable Surf , a California nonprofit that leverages surf culture into a force for protecting the world’s oceans. The project hits close to home for Béhar, an avid surfer and kiteboarder, as well as an ambassador for Sustainable Surf. “I am passionate about protecting the oceans,” Béhar wrote in a blog post . “I surf, swim and explore in them. And I have seen firsthand the damage done. When Sustainable Surf and San Francisco-based sail recycler Mafia Bags approached me, I saw this project as an opportunity to create awareness and finance sustainability programs … and to make a good bag with waste materials.” Related: Yves Béhar unveils new Smart Locks that make keyless entry a breeze Designed, sourced, and crafted in San Francisco, the Deep Blue Bag is chock-full of adventure-ready features, water-resistant wet pocket (for wetsuits and sweaty gym clothes), a padded laptop pouch, a hidden side-seam pocket for your wallet and keys, external and internal gear loops, and a place to secure a water bottle. All zippers are designed to be weather-resistant for “fog, rain, sun, shine.” Besides boasting a generous lifetime warranty from Mafia Bags, no two bags are exactly alike. “One thing that I love about this bag is that because of the way the sails are constructed and re-used, the stitching may happen in different places, which makes every bag a one-of-kind,” Béhar said. Each carryall diverts more than 10 square feet of material from the landfill, according to its Kickstarter campaign , where you can preorder a bag for $175. Related: “Listen Closely” lampshades are made with legacy sails from Canada Place All profits from the Deep Blue Bag will go to Sustainable Surf to expand Waste to Waves, a recycling program that reimagines trash as a resource for creating new products. “When you buy this product, you’re not only investing in a functional adventure pack— you’re helping to keep our oceans clean, and supporting a movement that’s making treasure from our trash,” Béhar said. + Deep Blue Bag at Kickstarter + Fuse Project

Here is the original: 
Yves Bhar recycles wetsuits and boat sails into ocean-friendly bags

Tower of Winds embraces impermanence with a striking kinetic facade

November 8, 2017 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

The Tower of Winds reimagines common water reservoirs as structures in constant evolution. Designed as a competition proposal in 2015 by architect Tram-Anh Nyugen, Markus Von Dellinghausen, Midori Hasuike, and Andreas Nordstrom, the project demonstrates how modular elements and local resources can be used to build state-of-the-art sustainable facilities with low construction costs. The project is part of an interdisciplinary design research platform founded by architect Tram-Anh Nyugen. Called Impermanent Devices , the project focuses on one the three characteristics of existence in Buddhism “Antiya”, the belief that all that exists is transient. Related: Temporary Story Tower Made With Recycled Materials Offers Free Book Exchange in Latvia The theoretical foundation of the project rests on the idea that design can be transformed to fit different contexts, scales and functions. Structures should be able to appear, disappear and evolve in order to facilitate continual change and fluidity of space. The architect’s work has been applied to several research projects, including an urban planning project in Paris on the Pe?riphe?rique, a major ring road that separates the inner city from the suburbs in Paris . Another recent live project is a commission from the BHD Star Cineplex to design a cinema in the center of Hanoi, Vietnam. This project gives the cinema a new interactive façade that references Vietnamese elements. + Impermanent Devices

Here is the original post:
Tower of Winds embraces impermanence with a striking kinetic facade

Artist turns recyclable cardboard into strikingly lifelike human sculptures

November 8, 2017 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

That Amazon delivery box you’ve chucked in the recycling bin might not mean much to you, but in the hands of artist James Lake cardboard takes on almost limitless possibilities. The talented UK sculptor has been working with cardboard for 20 years, manipulating the medium into human sculptures and other objects full of expression and detail. James, who describes cardboard as a “brilliant material to work with,” challenges viewers to see the extraordinary in things often dismissed as mundane. When James was 17, he developed bone cancer that ended with the amputation of his right leg. Despite, or perhaps because of, these struggles, he developed a passion for the arts that he’s channeled into sculpting cardboard. “When I first started making sculpture I decided to use cardboard as my medium of choice,” says James on his website . “I wanted a medium that can be used to sculpt beyond traditional material and without the need of an arts studio. The end result was the fine crafting of an inexpensive common place and recyclable material. I manipulate cardboard into taking a form which is vastly beyond its original function as a container to transport food and commercial goods.” Related: Modular Wikkelhouse wrapped in 24 layers of cardboard snaps together in a day In addition to his personal work and commissions, James’ work has been displayed in schools and as part of community projects. His use of cardboard goes beyond its cost-effective advantages; James believes the use of a ubiquitous material makes his sculptures more accessible “and blur the boundary between high art and low art.” As a self-described “diversity/inclusion artist,” James regularly holds art workshops with disadvantaged members of the community and provides resources to local schools and colleges. + James Lake Via Colossal

Go here to see the original: 
Artist turns recyclable cardboard into strikingly lifelike human sculptures

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1104 access attempts in the last 7 days.