Take a trip to explore natural beauty on the San Juan Islands

September 24, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

As I pick my way between the crazily-shaped logs, to the water of South Beach on San Juan Island, it’s a driftwood lover’s dream come true. Some pieces are propped up to make primitive shelters. I’m here to run a half marathon and see some fellow runners huddled inside these shelters, appreciating the windbreak as we watch gentle gray waves and await our start time. Only an hour off the Washington coast by ferry , the crowds and tall buildings of Seattle seem very far away. Related: Green-roofed vacation home embraces old-growth trees in the San Juan Islands The San Juan Islands include 172 named islands and reefs. But only a handful are well known, even in Washington, and only a few are served by ferry. I recently spent a September weekend exploring San Juan Island on the hunt for nature experiences and a look at island culture. Outdoor adventures My friend and I drove up from Portland and took the ferry from Anacortes to San Juan Island on a Friday morning. Since the road around the island is only 41 miles, we figured we’d have plenty of time to see everything. However, once we started dilly-dallying on island time, the hours evaporated. We started by driving up to Roche Harbor at the north end of the island, where we visited the San Juan Island Sculpture Park . The park covers 20 acres and displays more than 150 works of art , many made from recycled materials like sheep crafted out of old fishing nets. The garden area around the entrance is more manicured, with sculptures surrounded by plantings. But our favorite part was the Whimsey Woods, a forested trail full of art surprises like garlands of old LPs strung between trees, or a strange little outdoor living room with colorful, broken-bottomed chairs arranged around a creepy monkey jack-in-the-box. The park displays an ever-changing collection of work. If you’re an artist, you can find out about submissions here . Visiting a mausoleum is not everybody’s idea of a good time, but Afterglow Vista draws an impressive number of tourists. This mausoleum is the final resting place of John S. McMillin and his family , who monopolized the limestone trade on the west coast in the late 20th century. The huge round structure features seven columns (one broken, to represent life cut short) with a limestone table surrounded by six stone and concrete chairs. The ashes of the family are in the base of those chairs. McMillin was a Mason and the huge structure reflects Masonic symbolism as well as that of various spiritual and architectural traditions. While we didn’t manage to work whale watching into our trip, it’s one of the reasons I most want to return to the San Juan Islands. The Southern Resident Killer Whales who frequent the waters of the islands include three pods: J, K and L. They follow salmon and are most often seen in the summer months. The best ways to view them are from land, on a whale watching cruise or in a kayak. Or you can do like we did and visit the excellent Whale Museum on a rainy afternoon. If you do venture out by boat or kayak, follow these Whale Wise guidelines so you don’t harm or disturb the orcas and other local whales. Lime Kiln Point State Park on the west end of San Juan Island is considered one of the world’s best whale watching spots. Biking , hiking and running are other good ways to get outside and see the island. San Juan Island has both forested and beachy trails. Biking is very popular. Some people bring bikes on the ferry and get around on two wheels. But watch for cars—the roads are narrow and some have little in the way of shoulders. I participated in Orca Running’s annual San Juan Island Half Marathon, which is a fun way to check out the scenery with running support like periodic electrolytes, gels and portable toilets. Visit the lavender farm If you like the smell of lavender , stop at Pelindaba Lavender Farm. When we visited in September, the flowers in the organically certified fields had turned an inky purplish charcoal, rather than the typical purple. Turns out, that’s the time to harvest lavender for its oil. Culinary harvesting happens earlier. We got a lavender education and saw the distilling process in action.  The grounds are open for picnicking and wandering. Pelindaba’s website lists an impressive number of ways the public are invited to use the space free of charge, no reservation necessary: book club meetings, vow renewals, elopements, photo shoots and yoga in the fields. But I found it impossible to leave without a sack full of lavender souvenirs—salve, lip balm, essential oil, dark chocolate lavender sauce, to name a few—as well as, consuming a cup of lavender/lemon sorbet on the premises. Dining out Mike’s Café & Wine Bar is a phenomenal restaurant with a sleek, modern look and an all- plant-based menu. It’s a happening place on a weekend night and draws way more than just the vegan crowd. Locals stop in for Northwest beer and wine. Visitors like me are thrilled to see a big menu of tacos, interesting salads, sandwiches, bowls and fancy hors d’oeuvres. Since the islands are known for seafood, I was drawn to the crabby tacos made with vegan crabby cakes. We also got an appetizer of heirloom tomatoes with plant-based mozzarella and some delicious shishito peppers. The Cask & Schooner Public House also has several clearly marked vegan items, including an eggplant and red pepper spread sandwich, and a chickpea and leek saute. For coffee, we got hooked on the Salty Fox, which is in a big white Victorian house. Not only was the coffee good, but it’s perfectly situated on the harbor to watch the ferries and other boats come and go. Getting around We took our car on the ferry and then drove around the island, as many visitors do. But there are much more eco-conscious ways to go. You can leave a car in Anacortes and walk onto the ferry. Or take Amtrak to Mount Vernon, Washington, then get to Anacortes by Uber or public bus . Once you arrive on San Juan Island, you can get around by shuttle bus, or rent a bike, e-bike, scooter or electric car. Be sure to reserve your ferry passage ahead of time, especially if you’re bringing a car during the high season of June through September. Amy Nesler, stewardship and communications manager for the San Juan Islands Visitor Bureau , would like to see more visitors arrive car-free. Her ideal visitor “patronizes local shops, restaurants and tour operators, while being patient, kind and appreciative of service workers. They respect traffic etiquette, stay on marked trails, leave campsites/picnic areas better than they found them and maintain a respectful distance from wildlife , whether on land or sea.”  Where to stay Islanders are conscious of their island ecosystem, so many hotels have green initiatives. One of the best is the Island Inn at 123 West in Friday Harbor, the main town on San Juan Island.  Once the site of a fuel and storage facility for the local fishing fleet, cannery and ferry, the hotel is now Silver LEED certified. They reuse rainwater, supply extremely lightweight towels and sheets to save on laundry energy and stock refillable bath amenity dispensers to cut down on waste. Plus, they feature a custom blend by San Juan Coffee Roasting Company packed in recyclable materials. If you venture over to Orcas Island, the Pebble Cove Inn & Animal Sanctuary will serve you vegan food and prepare your room using cruelty free, natural cleaning products. You can meet adorable rescue animals like Dolly the mini horse and the Dread Captain Redbeard, a turkey who escaped the brutal American Thanksgiving tradition. Doe Bay Resort & Retreat , also on Orcas Island, offers yoga, massage and outdoor hot tubs. Doe Bay has a long history of being an alternative to the mainstream, from the time a mixed-race couple raised their family on 175 acres in the 1870s to hippie types discovering it in the 1960s and beyond. Photography by Teresa Bergen / Inhabitat

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Take a trip to explore natural beauty on the San Juan Islands

How Maine and Oregon seek to make manufacturers pay for packaging waste

September 24, 2021 by  
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Less than half of consumer packaging ultimately gets recycled.

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How Maine and Oregon seek to make manufacturers pay for packaging waste

Khawarizm Studio showcases unique 3D printed vase and lamp

September 15, 2021 by  
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In 2020, Khawarizm Studio’s 3D-printed smart lamp “The Future Catcher” (also known as LouLou, after the Arabic word for “pearls”) placed third in the 2020 3D Printed Luminaire Design Competition and was exhibited at Dubai Design Week. The light fixture design was a reference to Arabian wind catchers and meant to boost awareness of 3D printing in lighting and interior design . Now, designer Muhammad Khalid has revealed another futuristic 3D printed project, this time inspired by the Arabic word for “whirling,” referring to a form of physically active meditation that originated among Sufi groups. The new design, Tawwaf, is modeled after the whirling movements and classic Egyptian Tannura fabric. Featuring both a vase and lamp made from  recycled materials , the collection reflects a flowing pattern with bright, neon colors of orange, blue, pink and red. Related: Award-winning, 3D-printed smart lamp references Arabian wind catchers “We decided to implement computational design tools in our design aiming for a fluid form influenced by Whirling spirituality and Egyptian Tannura fabric behavior, through differential growth simulation starting from a circle to differentiated fluid curve,” explained the designer. “Whirling has been seen as a symbolic imitation of planets in the Solar System orbiting the sun, which led us to a serious question about producing “Tawwaf” on another planet in the future, as an answer we decided to use 3D Printing as production technology and Recycled PLA Filaments as a printing material aiming for possible opportunities in the future to spread  Egyptian  designs in the SPACE.” The lamp design uses smart  LED lighting  technology at its core, complete with multiple lighting modes and colors to reflect different styles and decor. Among the Tawwaf and the LouLou collections, the designer has also produced another vase concept called “Ward” (or the Arabic word for “flowers”) inspired by the Egyptian lotus flower as a symbol of purity, enlightenment and self-regeneration. + Khawarizm Studio Images courtesy of Khawarizm Studio

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Khawarizm Studio showcases unique 3D printed vase and lamp

14 eco-friendly van life essentials every vanlifer needs

September 15, 2021 by  
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Whether you’re hitting the trail for a weekend trip or committing to van living, there are some items you need to make your time more enjoyable. These eco-friendly van life essentials will keep you comfortable and help reduce your environmental footprint. Wildland Coffee Minimize the coffee -making supplies required for your cup of joe with Wildland’s Coffee in a Tea Bag. This convenience produces your morning brew in five to eight minutes. Simply prepare it as you would tea; drop the compostable coffee bag into hot water and allow it to steep. Conscientious coffee lovers will appreciate that Wildland Coffee uses ethically sourced beans from Brazil. Related: Couple turns old van into home-on-wheels for just $1K Layover travel blanket A light, packable blanket can go where you go. At only 11.4 ounces, the Layover by start-up Gravel will clip on to your day pack or stash away in the van with packed measurements of about 5 inches by 7 inches. Even better, the compressible insulation is made up of 100% recycled PET plastic. Allez Another ethically sourced essential, Allez uses plant-based ingredients for natural cleansing. The cloths are biodegradable , compact, lightweight and handmade in the U.S.A. Through a partnership with Purchase to Protect, Allez has stewarded over eight acres of protected rock climbing areas. Bee’s Wrap There’s no reason to fill your drawers (or your garbage can) with plastic wrap. Instead, grab some Bee’s Wrap for your food storage needs. The wraps are compact, come in a variety of sizes and reduce  waste . Bee’s Wrap is made in the U.S. from certified organic cotton, responsibly sourced beeswax, certified organic plant oils, and tree resin. Mioeco reusable towels Skip single-use paper towels and napkins in favor of bleach-free, organic cotton reusable ‘ unpaper ’ towels. The GOTS-certified material is produced via carbon-neutral,  solar-powered  manufacturing too. Osprey Arcane bag Adventure requires gear. Whether heading to the library for research on your next destination or packing up for a week in the wild, the Osprey Arcane series has you covered with bags that keep your smaller items organized and your essentials close at hand. Every bag is constructed from 100% recycled polyester fabric made from water bottles and offers a lifetime repair guarantee. Big Potato Games We all need a little entertainment in our lives, so when choosing games for your limited space, look to Big Potato Games , a brand dedicated to using the smallest box possible for space efficiency in shipping and storage. The company has also implemented a  plastic -free initiative, aiming to make 64% of its games plastic-free by the end of the year. Plus, the brand plants one tree for each game sold, supporting mangrove trees in Madagascar and working toward reforestation in Mozambique and Kenya. Plants Speaking of trees, your van life also needs some greenery, so select a cute flower pot and a favorite  plant  to hang indoors during your journey. Succulents are a resilient and popular choice that will brighten up any space. Reli. biodegradable trash bags Although you may be close to zero waste, it seems there’s always some trash to deal with. When the need calls, ‘ Reli ’ on biodegradable bags that break down in the landfill after being exposed to soil, air and  water .  All-natural sponges Even if you move all your belongings into a van, cleaning is still part of life, unfortunately. When choosing tools for the job, go with  natural materials . Standard sponges are often made using polyester or nylon, which is not recyclable or biodegradable. In contrast, Helping Out Mother Earth sponges are all-natural. Bite Toothpaste Continue your zero waste journey with toothpaste bits that come in a reusable glass jar instead of a tube. Bite Toothpaste Bits are made with natural, plant-based ingredients, and refill packs are made from 100% biodegradable cellulose. Wood utensils Food tastes better in nature, and cooking is better for the planet when you eliminate plastic from the process. Stock up on bamboo cooking utensils, or sets made of sustainably sourced wood.  Canning jars You may not be canning jam or salsa, but canning jars are the ideal storage device throughout the entire van. Use half-pint jars for herbs and spices and larger jars for nuts and seeds. Outside the kitchen, use a jar to store cotton balls and swabs, make an easy toothbrush holder or pot plants. Clothing  A minimalist van lifestyle means choosing quality over quantity, especially when it comes to clothing . Whether you’re dressing for work or the mountain, look for natural materials that will biodegrade back into the soil at the end of the piece’s usable life. Brands like prAna, Patagonia, Tentree, and Cotopaxi can get you started. Reviewing the essentials Wildland Coffee and Allez sent sample products for me to try out. Although I haven’t moved into van life quite yet, it’s on my radar. I am an avid backpacker and camper , however, so both products are a good lifestyle match. The Wildland Coffee is a ‘wild’ idea. I typically go with French press or drip when I have room. When I don’t, I use a funnel and an unbleached coffee filter that I bury afterward. But a simple tea bag in hot water is brilliant and simplifies the process immensely. It doesn’t get any easier to make a cup of coffee. The flavor is described as chocolatey and creamy. I wouldn’t say there’s that level of complexity, but it’s worlds better than instant coffee (yuck!), and the flavors are mild and well-balanced. I would be grateful to have this brew as part of my backpacking wake-up call. The Allez wipes are ultra-convenient, especially considering space and weight constraints when backpacking. I was shocked at the generous size. They’re very thick, too. I think I could wipe down my car with these things, so they can certainly handle anything nature throws my way. Better yet, they didn’t leave my skin feeling stripped like a lot of wipes do. I’m extremely sensitive to scents, so the Cactus Bloom and Chaparral scent was a little strong for me. That said, my husband’s sniff test didn’t find it to be overpowering, and he really enjoyed using the cleansing cloths himself. Images via Wildland Coffee, Allez, Osprey, Lindsay McCormick , Pixabay , and Dawn Hammon / Inhabitat 

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14 eco-friendly van life essentials every vanlifer needs

Google’s first retail location earns LEED Platinum certification

September 14, 2021 by  
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This summer, Google opened its first retail storefront in New York City. The landmark event is notable for a variety of reasons, perhaps the most noteworthy being that the location was planned, designed and built with sustainability in mind. In fact, its sustainability measures earned the space a LEED Platinum rating, the highest certification possible from the U.S. Green Building Council. Google has made headlines multiple times for its efforts to lean into environmentally-friendly practices. As a company, Google claims to be carbon neutral since 2007 and has set a goal to be carbon-free by 2030. That may seem like a long timeline, but achieving that goal within a decade for a company that size will require a clear vision and consistent change. In the short term, more immediate goals that will stair step to the larger achievement include earning zero waste to landfill certification in 2022, setting a 2025 deadline to be plastic-free in all packaging and incorporating recyclable or renewable materials into products. Related: Google’s San José Downtown West Mixed-Use Plan approved by city council The development team built a full-scale version of the retail space inside its Mountain View hangar; this allowed developers to physically evaluate the layout’s flow, look and customer experience. Architect Reddymade helped the team achieve its vision of an interactive, warm,  naturally lit  and approachable space. With a blueprint established, the project focused on energy efficiency and material selection to help Google meet its sustainability goals. Inside the space, responsibly sourced hickory veneer dresses the walls while highly sustainable cork and wood furniture was custom made by a local craftsman. Carpet made from recycled materials and  energy-efficient  lighting illuminate the focus on eco-friendly interior design.  More than just a space to display the range of Pixel phones, Nest products and other devices, the retail store stands as an example of LEED Platinum design that is rare amongst retail stores anywhere in the world.  According to a press release, Google is, “Honored to have worked with the U.S. Green Building Council in this process, and we now can share that the Google Store Chelsea is one of fewer than 215 retail spaces in the world to have achieved a LEED Platinum rating — the highest certification possible within the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design green building rating system.” + Google Via Environmental Leader Photography courtesy of Google and Paul Warchol

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Google’s first retail location earns LEED Platinum certification

This collapsible cooler is insulated with upcycled coconut fiber

September 9, 2021 by  
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Fortuna Cools recently announced the launch of the Nutshell Cooler, a collapsible cooler made using upcycled coconut fiber sourced from the  Philippines  and designed to outperform plastic. The company worked with local coconut farmers from a fishing village on Lubang Island to create the innovative, insulating material. Each cooler is insulated with 24 coconut husks and manufactured close to the farms, meaning more income for those small-scale coconut  farmers  and the creation of advanced jobs in their local agricultural communities. Since the liners use recycled PET, there are no virgin plastic components to the coolers either. Related: Coconut oil production is a danger to vulnerable species The cooler is the product of a collaboration between Tamara Mekler, a Behavioral Biologist with an M.S. from Stanford in Sustainable Development who previously worked in community-based conservation and environmental education, and David Cutler, a Stanford-educated designer who worked in development and consulting for startups and  NGOs  across Asia. The pair started working on coolers in the Philippines back in 2018 as university graduate students.  While studying with NGO Rare and the local community on Lubang Island in the Philippines, Mekler and Cutler discovered a way to turn coconut husk fiber (a leftover byproduct of the coconut meat industry that is typically burned as waste) into a material to replace plastic foam. Together with award-winning industrial engineers at Box Clever, they released the first coconut coolers in 2019 and created a Kickstarter for the Nutshell Cooler for an Early Bird price of $169 (MSRP $249). Through the 1% for the Planet program, the company donates at least 1% of sales to its  conservation  NGO partners in the Philippines. The cooler’s structure is inspired by origami, specifically the convenient feature of folding into itself to collapse and save space while not in use. Once open, it holds 19 liters (or enough for 18 cans and 14 pounds of ice) and weighs just eight pounds empty. Both the polyester shell and liner are 100%  recycled . Controlled tests promise to keep ice frozen as long as the Yeti Hopper Two and 10-40% longer than the Coleman Excursion, the REI Pack-Away and the popular Expanded Polystyrene ice chests. + Nutshell Coolers Via Core 77 Images courtesy of Nutshell Coolers

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This collapsible cooler is insulated with upcycled coconut fiber

NOMA Collectives Joshua Tree Edit highlights global artisans

September 8, 2021 by  
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California-based NOMA Collective, the brainchild of  interior designer  and creative director Rebecca Haskins, partners with craftspeople from places like Guatemala, Mexico, India and Sub-Saharan Africa to connect lesser-known global artisans with conscious consumers. Seeking out women’s cooperatives, small family-run businesses and individual artists, the company can provide unique pieces that are not only made using traditional, generations-long crafting techniques but also made one at a time by hand. All products are  fair trade  through ethical work environments and crafted using locally sourced materials, many of which are natural or recycled. Already the collective features gifts and home decor such as baskets, blankets and throws, pillows, rugs, napkins and hand towels, amongst others. Related: GlobeIn offers unique, handmade items from around the globe NOMA’s latest collection is inspired by the shapes, textures and colors of the desert — specifically  Joshua Tree National Park  in southeastern California. This area is known for its pastel sunsets and vast stretches of arid desert landscape, dotted with a variety of cacti, succulents and spikey Joshua “trees” (which aren’t really trees but rather plants more closely related to the yucca family). Dubbed the Joshua Tree Edit, the collection features pops of greens, blues and light pinks akin to that of the West Coast desert setting. Among the collection are the Santiago Blankets in both navy and grey colors and a pair of thick wool throws that come from the mountain region of Momostenango, Guatemala. The  wool  is locally sourced and spun by hand on an antique wooden spinning wheel before being dyed using non-toxic dyes, a process that can take up to four days to complete. The collection also includes several baskets, like the Abaco Hamper, which is hand weaved using reduced strips of  recycled plastic  in the West African nation of Senegal. There are also decorative bowls, like the Ivy Wooden Bowl carved by artisans in remote Rwanda. + NOMA Collective Photographs courtesy of Charlotte Lea

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NOMA Collectives Joshua Tree Edit highlights global artisans

Designing sustainable habitats at the San Diego Zoo

September 8, 2021 by  
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What’s more amazing, a tiny nectar-drinking  bird  that weighs less than a nickel and can fly backward, or a giant carnivorous lizard that can smell a dying animal up to six miles away? They’re both impressive, and now visitors to the San Diego Zoo can experience both hummingbirds and Komodo dragons in brand new habitats just steps away from each other. The two new  habitats  have been carefully designed, both from an eco-materials standpoint and considering what will make these creatures feel most at home. The hummingbirds can bathe in their choice of three water ponds, each using recycled water, or nest in green walls. Visitor benches are made from recycled plastic lumber. Komodo Kingdom features three distinct environments that wild dragons would enjoy — mountain highland, woodland and beach. The habitat also features heated caves and logs, pools and misters to replicate the hot and steamy environment of their native Indonesia. Related: San Diego Zoo successfully clones an endangered Przewalski’s horse There’s also an area of deep, soft sand for egg-laying. Zookeepers hope that Ratu, the female, and Satu, the male, will like each other enough to make baby lizards. Satu only arrived a few months ago, in time for the opening of Komodo Kingdom in June. The two haven’t met yet, and are currently being kept in separate parts of the enclosure. So what’s it like designing habitats for such diverse creatures as Komodo dragons and hummingbirds? Inhabitat talked to San Diego Zoo  architect  Vanessa Nevers to find out. Inhabitat: How did you go about researching the lifestyle and preferences of Komodo dragons? Nevers: San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance’s Architecture and Planning department worked closely with our  wildlife  care experts to determine not only the needs of the Komodo dragon but also the ways that the habitat design would encourage natural behaviors such as digging, soaking in shallow waters and basking, to name a few. Inhabitat: What factors did you take into consideration when designing Komodo Kingdom from a materials standpoint? Nevers: For the Komodo habitats, getting enough UV  light  into the space is critical, as is maintaining the hot, humid environments that Komodo dragons thrive in. The roof and clerestory at the two indoor habitats consist of an ETFE [Ethylene tetrafluoroethylene, a recyclable plastic that’s 100 times lighter than glass] system that facilitates appropriate levels of UV transmission and climate control. Other factors to take into account for habitat design are soils and plantings that are safe for the Komodo dragons and allow for natural behaviors. Also, the ability to create sheltered areas and pools that are just the right size, heated rocks and elevated areas for basking is very important and is usually executed with shotcrete rockwork. Inhabitat: What are the main features of the hummingbird enclosure? Nevers: Interestingly, the features that make the Hummingbird Habitat great for birds also make it very pleasant for people. The central spatial feature is a semicircular cenote-themed shotcrete structure with fly-through openings and vertical plantings. This structure breaks up the experience into three spaces which also helps define territories for the birds. The flowing ponds and streams, as well as a built-in misting system, add ambiance but also provide ample bird bathing opportunities. And of course, the tropical  plantings  with big broad leaves and the nectar-producing plants are also essential and enjoyable for both birds and people. Inhabitat: How did sustainability affect your choice of building materials? Nevers:  Sustainability  is an important consideration in the selection of all building materials. For example, the ceilings at Komodo Kingdom and Hummingbird Habitat are clad with Accoya wood, and the interior and exterior walls at Hummingbird Habitat are clad with Moso [a type of bamboo]. Both Accoya wood and Moso are Forest Stewardship Council-certified products. The ETFE system, which has been awarded the Environmental Product Declaration (EPD), is used at both Komodo Kingdom and Hummingbird Habitat. It has low levels of embodied energy and can be recycled at the end of its useful life into components used in the manufacture of new ETFE systems. Inhabitat: Did anything surprise you during the process? Nevers: Komodo dragons like it hot, really hot! Their native habitat in the islands of  Indonesia  is usually about 95 degrees Fahrenheit with 70% humidity. This doesn’t sound surprising on paper, but stepping into the indoor habitats in Komodo Kingdom shortly before the dragons moved in was like walking into a sauna. The Komodo dragons love it, but I felt like I was melting! Inhabitat: How does it feel to design habitats for rare and endangered creatures? Nevers: Amazing! Being part of a team that creates habitats that allow these  animals  to thrive is one of the two most rewarding aspects of my work. The other is creating opportunities for people to really appreciate how incredible all life is and the importance of sustaining healthy habitats around the world. Inhabitat: What would you like people to know about the work that you do? Nevers: Zoo architecture is so much more than the design and construction of buildings; it truly is the architecture of experience. From the range of habitat experiences for the animals to the experiences in the guest landscape, these are all part of a larger effort to foster relationships with nature in support of  conservation  for a healthy planet. + San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance Images courtesy of the San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance and Teresa Bergen / Inhabitat

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Designing sustainable habitats at the San Diego Zoo

We Earthlings: For Every Million Cellphones Recycled

September 7, 2021 by  
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It’s important to recycle electronics to ensure that toxic materials are properly disposed of and… The post We Earthlings: For Every Million Cellphones Recycled appeared first on Earth911.

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We Earthlings: For Every Million Cellphones Recycled

Dash Linear turns cardboard into high-performance lighting

September 6, 2021 by  
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As part of  interior design , lighting serves a greater purpose than illumination alone. Fixtures set the tone of a room and work as a central element in the theme. Graypants Studio, with offices in Seattle and Amsterdam, takes the look of its lighting products seriously while placing a focus on producing them sustainably. The studio’s newest release, Dash Linear, is a high-performance lighting option for newly-created home-work spaces, home additions or upgraded kitchens. Dash Linear is the latest installment in Graypants’ Scraplight series, an appropriate name considering they are made out of recycled and virgin cardboard. Related: Serif + Sero modular furniture is made of 100% upcycled cardboard It may seem counterintuitive to make lighting out of paper, but the team at Graypants is dedicated to marrying modern and  minimalist  designs with technical function while maintaining a low carbon footprint. To this end, Dash Linear is handmade using a low-impact manufacturing process that includes zero-VOC adhesive and limited material waste.  Dash Linear is currently available across North America and offered in three finishes — natural, white and blonde.  Recycled  cardboard is used for the natural Dash, while virgin corrugated cardboard is used for the white and blonde options. There are height and length options, as well as differing brightness levels for a custom feel over a desk or other workstation. Available lengths are 48 or 93 inches. Height options range from 4 to 12 inches. While lit, Dash Linear relies on  energy-efficient  LED modules and can offer direct or uniform lighting. The flagship Scraplight line also includes table lamp options made from recycled materials and mounted on a brass base. Graypants Studio also creates pendant lamps in a variety of shapes and finishes.  Graypants explains that the studio “was founded as an opportunity to apply an architectural mindset to product design and art —enhancing space and enriching experiences. Graypants’ work, rooted in light-minded design, includes architecture, product design, art installation and exhibition, and fixture design.”  + Graypants Images via Graypants

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Dash Linear turns cardboard into high-performance lighting

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