How India’s Tata is mainstreaming natural and social capital

April 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Giant Indian conglomerate Tata group is moving to account for tough-to-value environmental, human and social factors within its business decisions. The exercise hasn’t been easy, but it’s determined to try.

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How India’s Tata is mainstreaming natural and social capital

Can Apple close the loop? Tech giant targets 100% recycled material

April 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green, Recycle

Apple is aiming to use 100 percent recycled materials to make its iPhones, Macbooks and other electronics products in the future in a bid to reduce its reliance on mined raw materials, the company revealed last week.

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Can Apple close the loop? Tech giant targets 100% recycled material

The March for Science and what’s at stake for business

April 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

The lackluster political support for science could bite companies squarely in the supply chain, among other places.

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The March for Science and what’s at stake for business

Thousands take to the streets to march for science in cities around the globe

April 23, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Tens of thousands of people took to the streets for Saturday’s March for Science , a series of rallies and marches held on Earth Day . With over 600 rallies across the world, the “celebration of science” advocated the use of evidence-based policy making in all levels of government, with climate change a core topic. President Donald Trump administration’s recent budget cuts to many environment-related programs and his perceived hostility to science served as a major spark for the movement. Inspired by the 2017 Women’s March of January 21, 2017, the March for Science amassed large support in a short amount of time thanks largely to social media channels like Facebook and Twitter. Co-led by nonprofit Earth Day Network , the March for Science was officially declared non-political although many protestors used it as an opportunity to protest Trump’s administration. The main march kicked off in the early morning with a mass gathering on Washington D.C.’s National Mall followed by a march down Constitution Avenue toward the Capitol in the afternoon.t Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images Hundreds of satellite marches were held around the world on every continent except for Antartica. In D.C., the event was headlined by Bill Nye , Mona Hanna-Attisha, and Lydia Villa-Kmoaroff who, along with other well-known activists in the science community, presented a series of speeches complemented by “teach-ins,” educational sessions that covered topics from climate change to endangered wildlife. Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images Related: Why scientists are marching in over 400 cities on Earth Day Many protestors displayed homemade signs with many indirectly and directly attacking Trump with slogans such as “What do Trump and atoms have in common? They make up everything,” “Mr. President, science gave us Romaine,” and “Pruitt Plus Trump Equals Bad Chemistry.” A few hours after the marches kicked off, President Trump released a statement on Saturday saying: “Rigorous science is critical to my administration’s efforts to achieve the twin goals of economic growth and environmental protection. My administration is committed to advancing scientific research that leads to a better understanding of our environment and of environmental risks. As we do so, we should remember that rigorous science depends not on ideology, but on a spirit of honest inquiry and robust debate.” Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images The March for Science was held just a week prior to another major science-related march , the People’s Climate March that will take place in cities across the world on April 29, 2017. + March for Science Lead image via Wikimedia Commons Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images

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Thousands take to the streets to march for science in cities around the globe

Amber-tinted glass clads Gienckes extraordinary concert hall in Latvia

April 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

At the heart of the building lies the Great Hall, a venue that holds up to 1,000 guests for performances by the resident Liepaja Symphony Orchestra or other acts. The space is primed for acoustic perfection and is visually pleasing as well. Sunlight is piped in via sun tubes to give the space a natural glow and the seats’ fabric mimic the variation in hues created by light shining through the amber glass. Related: The world’s first sustainable dance club opens in Rotterdam The hall is also home to the Liepaja Conservatorium, a ballet studio, and an experimental stage. Students and teachers of the arts can also meet and share their imaginative creations in the various instruction and rehearsal rooms available. For the public, a bar and music club attracts those interested in a night on the town and a dose of local culture. It’s no doubt the Great Amber Concert Hall will entertain and inspire for years to come. + Volker Giencke Via Frame Images via Indrikis Sturmanis and Aigars Prusis

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Amber-tinted glass clads Gienckes extraordinary concert hall in Latvia

Amber-tinted glass clads Gienckes extraordinary concert hall in Latvia

April 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

At the heart of the building lies the Great Hall, a venue that holds up to 1,000 guests for performances by the resident Liepaja Symphony Orchestra or other acts. The space is primed for acoustic perfection and is visually pleasing as well. Sunlight is piped in via sun tubes to give the space a natural glow and the seats’ fabric mimic the variation in hues created by light shining through the amber glass. Related: The world’s first sustainable dance club opens in Rotterdam The hall is also home to the Liepaja Conservatorium, a ballet studio, and an experimental stage. Students and teachers of the arts can also meet and share their imaginative creations in the various instruction and rehearsal rooms available. For the public, a bar and music club attracts those interested in a night on the town and a dose of local culture. It’s no doubt the Great Amber Concert Hall will entertain and inspire for years to come. + Volker Giencke Via Frame Images via Indrikis Sturmanis and Aigars Prusis

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Amber-tinted glass clads Gienckes extraordinary concert hall in Latvia

The chicken or the egg — or neither

April 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Lab-grown promises to be one of modern science’s finest hours. Is it enough to change, or end, the way humans consume animals?

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The chicken or the egg — or neither

VIDEO: Self-flying electric car successfully takes its maiden voyage

April 21, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Forget the flying cars you’ve seen in sci-fi movies because the air transportation of the future is going to be way better than we imagined – at least, if Lilium Aviation has anything to do with it. The aviation company recently unveiled their all-electric, self-flying car. And while there are quite a few flying car prototypes driving, er, flying around right now, Lilium sets itself apart with its electric engine and vertical takeoff, which the company successfully tested for the first time this week. The vehicle is powered by 36 electric jet engines. Electric powered-flight is just developing, but Lilium has figured out how to make it work in its prototype. “It’s the same battery that you can find in any Tesla,” co-founder Patrick Nathen told The Verge . The battery consumes 90 percent less than current drone aircraft. The craft has a flight speed of 186 mph with a range of 186 miles per charge. Related: AeroMobil is launching a flying car that you can actually buy this year Lilium’s prototype is a two-seater, but the company plans to eventually make a 5-seat vehicle that can be used as an air taxi. For the maiden voyage, the craft was remotely piloted from the ground, but the company is shooting for manned flight night. The final version will be piloted autonomously and you will be able to book a flight using your smartphone, just like a Lyft in the sky. Via The Verge

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VIDEO: Self-flying electric car successfully takes its maiden voyage

VIDEO: Self-flying electric car successfully takes its maiden voyage

April 21, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Forget the flying cars you’ve seen in sci-fi movies because the air transportation of the future is going to be way better than we imagined – at least, if Lilium Aviation has anything to do with it. The aviation company recently unveiled their all-electric, self-flying car. And while there are quite a few flying car prototypes driving, er, flying around right now, Lilium sets itself apart with its electric engine and vertical takeoff, which the company successfully tested for the first time this week. The vehicle is powered by 36 electric jet engines. Electric powered-flight is just developing, but Lilium has figured out how to make it work in its prototype. “It’s the same battery that you can find in any Tesla,” co-founder Patrick Nathen told The Verge . The battery consumes 90 percent less than current drone aircraft. The craft has a flight speed of 186 mph with a range of 186 miles per charge. Related: AeroMobil is launching a flying car that you can actually buy this year Lilium’s prototype is a two-seater, but the company plans to eventually make a 5-seat vehicle that can be used as an air taxi. For the maiden voyage, the craft was remotely piloted from the ground, but the company is shooting for manned flight night. The final version will be piloted autonomously and you will be able to book a flight using your smartphone, just like a Lyft in the sky. Via The Verge

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VIDEO: Self-flying electric car successfully takes its maiden voyage

Scientists will attempt to be the first to drill into Earth’s mantle

April 21, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Scientists want to plumb the Earth for one of its last secrets. An international group of researchers led by  Japan’s Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology say they plan to be the first to successfully drill into the mantle, that is, the region sandwiched between the planet’s outer crust and its inner core. Although the mantel makes up about 80 percent of the Earth’s mass, much of it remains a geological enigma. “We don’t know the exact [composition] of the mantle yet,” researcher Natsue Abe told CNN . To access the mantel, JAMSTEC will deploy the Chikyu, one of its biggest and most sophisticated drilling vessels, to penetrate 2.5 miles of ocean, then another 3.7 miles of sea floor (a.k.a the crust). The Japanese government is backing the expedition in the hopes that the data gleaned will help scientists better predict earthquakes. Related: Geologists find seventh continent hiding in plain sight “In Japan we have some volcanoes, earthquakes and such kind of natural hazards,” Abe said. “People [want to create] some monitoring or analysis equipment but we don’t know … what kind of factor to use. So we need to know the natural system more clearly or precisely … we have to observe the Earth more precisely.” All three drilling sites currently under consideration are located in the Pacific Ocean. The first is off Hawaii, the second off Costa Rica, and the third is off Mexico. “We already drilled and have taken some samples from the ocean floor but [only] from the top,” Abe said. “[We want] to dig from the ocean floor to the deep pristine mantle.” Via CNN Earth image via Wikimedia  and Flickr

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Scientists will attempt to be the first to drill into Earth’s mantle

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