10 eco-friendly holiday gift ideas for friends

November 27, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Too often, the giving season feels like a mad rush to check tasks off a list. It’s all too easy (and embarrassing) to wind up giving our friends and family junk gifts that we regret buying. Our  shopping  guide makes it simple to find sustainably made, easy-to-purchase presents that you can feel good about giving over the holidays. Spent grain pancakes Everybody has to eat, and anybody sane likes a good pancake. This  spent grain mix  is low carb, high  protein , contains lots of fiber and uses recycled grains. What?! That’s right, these pancakes are called “spent” because the barley flour comes from microbrewery castoffs. You and your pancake gift recipient will feel even better about breakfast knowing that Grain4Grain donates to a food bank every time somebody purchases a box. Related: How to make soy wax candles for a cozy, autumnal home Shoes by Allbirds Buying shoes can be intimate, so this one is for your close friends.  Allbirds , best known for its sneakers, also makes boat shoes, slip-ons and flats. Choose from shoes made from wool — supposedly these New Zealand sheep have a fabulous life — or, for your  vegan bestie, choose shoes made from responsibly sourced eucalyptus fiber. As a carbon-neutral company, Allbirds puts eco-thought into all aspects of business. The laces are made from recycled plastic bottles, the insoles use castor bean oil and even the shipping boxes are made from 90% recycled cardboard. Digital thrift store gift card Some friends are easier to shop for than others. For some particular people, it’s best to let them pick out their own  gifts . Help them shop sustainably with a digital thrift store gift card from Rent the Runway or thredUP. Upcycled clutch from Jungalow Jungalow  specializes in bright colors and bold botanical patterns. The company is the brainchild of  design  blogger Justina Blakeney. Now you can get Jungalow’s super lush upholstery fabrics in a clutch purse. These clutches use upholstery scraps that wound up on the cutting room floor. Your friend can carry it as a small purse, or keep important things organized inside the clutch while tossing it in a larger bag. Darling little tassels adorn the clutch’s zipper. Girlfriend Collective activewear Through  fashion  alchemy,  Girlfriend Collective  turns old fishing nets, plastic bottles and other trash into chic leggings, bras, socks, sweatsuits and shorts. The company has already sidetracked about 4.5 million plastic water bottles bound for a dubious fate. You can find clothing for all sizes, and even a maternity section on their website. Homemade sugar scrub For a low-cost yet personal gift with a sweet scent, make your friend a sugar scrub. All you need is  sugar , coconut oil (or similar) and a few drops of essential oil. Use the essential oil straight out of the bottle, or make a special blend for your friend. Scoop the scrub into a mason jar, tie a bow around it, and it’s ready to gift. Full details on making sugar scrubs are available at  The Simple Veganista . Malala Scrunchie With a  Malala scrunchi , your friend can secure her hair while simultaneously promoting  education  for girls. When you buy these hair holders, the money goes to the Malala Fund, named for the brave and beloved Pakistani heroine and kick-ass activist Malala Yousufzai. The scrunchies are made from sustainably sourced bamboo fabric and dyed with natural plant dyes, like turmeric for yellow, indigo for blue and madder root for pink. We like the pumpkin color for fall and winter. Cruelty-free, 10-free nail polish from Pear Nova Ten what? Bad ingredients: toluene, formaldehyde, formaldehyde resin, DBP, xylene, parabens, camphor, fragrances, phthalates or animal ingredients. Not sure what all those ingredients are? The bottom line is you probably don’t want them on your nails.  Pear Nova  products are 10-free, designed in  Chicago  and look much more stylish than your average drugstore nail polish. The inventive colors have fun names, such as Cleo F*ckin Patra, Rub My Temples, It’s Summer Somewhere and Rooftop ‘Til You Drop. Wine barrel Apple Watch strap In another clever example of  upcycling ,  Uncommon Goods  offers an upgrade for your Apple Watch strap. Your oenophile friend will feel good knowing that her new watch strap was once a French oak wine barrel. These straps are made in Austria and compatible with Apple Watch Series 5, 4 and 3. Eco travel kit In this pandemic  holiday  season, everybody wants things to go back to normal ASAP. Give the gift of optimism with this  eco travel kit . Your friend will smell delightful with naturally flavored lip balm, deodorant, moisturizer and perfume in grapefruit, bergamot and rose scents. She’ll nap beneath a silky eye mask and wake to note her thoughts in an artisan-crafted kite notebook. The kits come in a vegan leather case and also include earplugs, q-tips, hair ties, disposable face masks and Emergen-Cs. You can upgrade and personalize the Aria Kit with extra add-ons. Images via Grain4Grain , Katherine Gallagher / Inhabitat, thredUP , Jungalow , Girlfriend , Pixabay, HARA , Pear Nova , Uncommon Goods , and Aria Kit

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10 eco-friendly holiday gift ideas for friends

Prefab Morgan Motor Company Experience Centre uses sustainable timber

November 27, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Bath, U.K.-based Hewitt Studios has given a stunning makeover to Morgan Motor Company’s aging café, museum and showroom with the new Experience Centre, a prefabricated visitor center made from sustainably sourced timber . Designed with reusability in mind, the building takes cues from the British motor car manufacturer’s hand-built sports cars that are constructed from three recyclable core elements: ash timber, aluminum and leather. The sustainably minded building also reduces its carbon footprint with high-performance insulation, daylighting and a responsible stormwater management strategy. With more than a century of experience working with local craftsmen to construct its handmade cars, the Morgan Motor Company has built its reputation on ethical sourcing, natural materials and a focus on longevity. As a result, Hewitt Studios wanted the new Experience Centre to reflect the company’s sustainable values and used three prefabricated structures built of timber in a nod to the company’s historic ash body frames. These structures include the Jewel Box, a display space for the company’s hero car and customer handovers; a sculptural visitor entrance foyer; and an external covered car canopy that is large enough to shelter the demo car fleet. The car canopy features an undulating profile evocative of the Malvern Hills’ rolling topography. Related: Visitor center disguised as a hill to welcome visitors to Denmark’s historic Kalø Castle Ruins The architects also put new cladding and roofing atop the existing buildings and built out the internal spaces. Timber and easily recyclable aluminum flashings were used for the cladding and are detailed for easy dismantling and recycling. Metsawood Kerto laminated veneer lumber, an inexpensive off-the-shelf industrial product made with certified timber from sustainably managed forests, was also incorporated into all of the new structures, particularly in the sculptural canopies.  The architects explained, “This strategy of using a single conventional product in a number of unconventional ways delivers terrific value for Morgan, creating the impression of an expensive bespoke outcome using readily available ‘stock’ timber sections — maximum bang for their buck!” + Hewitt Studios Images via Morgan Motor Company

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Prefab Morgan Motor Company Experience Centre uses sustainable timber

Modular treehouse concept is inspired by wasp nests

November 27, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

As an entry to the Young Architects Competitions’ Tree House Module contest, the architecture team of Garvin Goepel and Christian Baumgarten have proposed a modular treehouse called Nidus Domum that is made up of two shelters inspired by wasp nests. The modules are designed to sit on the property of Vibrac castle in France to help visitors escape modern civilization. Curved in shape and designed to shelter visitors high up in the trees, Nidus Domum provides a closer connection to nature . The layering, addition and multiplication of individual elements of the modules are inspired by the way that wasps build their nests, in a similar systematic and engineered pattern. With wasps, oval-shaped nests are protected by a layer of chewed wood chips and wasp saliva, like a glue. The insects build layers next to each other in order to strengthen the inner population’s protection. Related: Treehouse hotel in Bali offers maximum views with a minimal footprint The modules interlock through single parts rather than in a continuous large surface, making the production and fabrication of the treehouse highly customizable. Panels can be adapted to specialized contextual arrangements, like tree branches, by exchanging and customizing single panels. Individual elements are designed small enough to be prefabricated in local factories, quickly transported to building sites and easily assembled. Subsequently, the modules are also easy to take apart and move to other locations. The treehouse modules are composed of 24 individual panels with a wooden frame that includes inner bent wood paneling and an outer cladding made of liana tree bark splits sourced from the building site. The first module, Nidus Dolichovespula sylvestris (Nest of a Tree Wasp), suspends from the tree high above the ground. From the shelter, inhabitants gain an elevated view through the forest toward the castle on one side and the remote wild landscape on the other. In contrast, the second module, Nidus Polistinae (Nest of a Field Wasp), has a free-standing construction. The design is elevated by pilings, so it doesn’t require a tree as structural support and maintains space for a sauna . This sauna is built using the same system and connects to a terrace poised over the lake surface. Users can steam in the sauna before dipping their feet in the cold water below. + Garvin Goepel + Christian Baumgarten Images via Christian Baumgarten

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Modular treehouse concept is inspired by wasp nests

Booming secondhand clothing sales could help curb the sustainability crisis in fashion

November 27, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Booming secondhand clothing sales could help curb the sustainability crisis in fashion Hyejune Park Fri, 11/27/2020 – 01:00 A massive force is reshaping the fashion industry: secondhand clothing. According to a new report, the U.S. secondhand clothing market is projected to more than triple in value in the next 10 years  — from $28 billion in 2019 to $80 billion in 2029 — in a U.S. market currently worth $379 billion . In 2019, secondhand clothing expanded 21 times faster than conventional apparel retail did. Even more transformative is secondhand clothing’s potential to dramatically alter the prominence of fast fashion — a business model characterized by cheap and disposable clothing that emerged in the early 2000s, epitomized by brands such as H&M and Zara. Fast fashion grew exponentially over the next two decades, significantly altering the fashion landscape by producing more clothing, distributing it faster and encouraging consumers to buy in excess with low prices. While fast fashion is expected to continue to grow 20 percent in the next 10 years, secondhand fashion is poised to grow 185 percent . As researchers who study clothing consumption and sustainability, we think the secondhand clothing trend has the potential to reshape the fashion industry and mitigate the industry’s detrimental environmental impact on the planet. The next big thing The secondhand clothing market is composed of two major categories, thrift stores and resale platforms. But the latter largely has fueled the recent boom. Secondhand clothing has long been perceived as worn out and tainted, mainly sought by bargain or treasure hunters . However, this perception has changed, and now many consumers consider secondhand clothing to be of identical or even superior quality to unworn clothing. A trend of “fashion flipping”  — or buying secondhand clothes and reselling them — also has emerged, particularly among young consumers. While fast fashion is expected to continue to grow 20% in the next 10 years, secondhand fashion is poised to grow 185%. Thanks to growing consumer demand and new digital platforms such as Tradesy and Poshmark that facilitate peer-to-peer exchange of everyday clothing, the digital resale market is quickly becoming the next big thing in the fashion industry. The market for secondhand luxury goods is also substantial. Retailers such as The RealReal or the Vestiaire Collective provide a digital marketplace for authenticated luxury consignment, where people buy and sell designer labels such as Louis Vuitton, Chanel and Hermès. The market value of this sector reached $2 billion in 2019 . The secondhand clothing trend also appears to be driven by affordability, especially now, during the COVID-19 economic crisis . Consumers not only have reduced their consumption of nonessential items such as clothing , but also are buying more quality garments over cheap, disposable attire. For clothing resellers, the ongoing economic contraction combined with the increased interest in sustainability has proven to be a winning combination. More mindful consumers? The fashion industry has long been associated with social and environmental problems, ranging from poor treatment of garment workers to pollution and waste generated by clothing production. Less than 1 percent of materials used to make clothing are recycled to make new clothing, a $500 billion annual loss for the fashion industry . The textile industry produces more carbon emissions than the airline and maritime industries combined . And about 20 percent of water pollution across the globe is the result of wastewater from the production and finishing of textiles. Consumers have become more aware of the ecological impact of apparel production and are more frequently demanding apparel businesses expand their commitment to sustainability . Buying secondhand clothing could provide consumers a way to push back against the fast-fashion system. Worldwide, in the past 15 years, the average number of times a garment is worn before it’s trashed has decreased by 36%. Buying secondhand clothing increases the number of owners an item will have, extending its life — something dramatically shortened in the age of fast fashion . (Worldwide, in the past 15 years, the average number of times a garment is worn before it’s trashed has decreased by 36 percent.) High-quality clothing traded in the secondhand marketplace also retains its value over time , unlike cheaper fast-fashion products. Thus, buying a high-quality secondhand garment instead of a new one is theoretically an environmental win. But some critics argue the secondhand marketplace actually encourages excess consumption by expanding access to cheap clothing . Our latest research supports this possibility . We interviewed young American women who regularly use digital platforms such as Poshmark. They saw secondhand clothing as a way to access both cheap goods and ones they ordinarily could not afford. They did not see it as an alternative model of consumption or a way to decrease dependence on new clothing production. Whatever the consumer motive, increasing the reuse of clothing is a big step toward a new normal in the fashion industry, although its potential to address sustainability woes remains to be seen. This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Pull Quote While fast fashion is expected to continue to grow 20% in the next 10 years, secondhand fashion is poised to grow 185%. Worldwide, in the past 15 years, the average number of times a garment is worn before it’s trashed has decreased by 36%. Contributors Cosette Marie Joyner Armstrong Topics Circular Economy Fashion Apparel Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Photo by  gabriel12  on Shutterstock.

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Booming secondhand clothing sales could help curb the sustainability crisis in fashion

Inspiring mud-and-bamboo Anandaloy Building uplifts a Bangladeshi community

November 26, 2020 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

German architecture practice Studio Anna Heringer has received the international architecture prize OBEL AWARD 2020 for its work on the Anandaloy Building, an unconventional project combining sustainable construction and social development to catalyze local development in rural Bangladesh. Created to follow the practice’s motto that “architecture is a tool to improve lives,” the curved building was built by local villagers using locally sourced mud and bamboo and serves as both a community center for people with disabilities and a small workspace for producing fair textiles. The project’s name Anandaloy means ‘The Place of Deep Joy’ in the local Bengali dialect. Located in the northern Bangladeshi village of Rudrapur, the multifunctional community center was designed to celebrate diversity and inclusion — concepts that are particularly important for those with disabilities in Bangladesh, where having a disability is sometimes regarded as karmic punishment. The building also helps empower local women and counteract urban-rural migration with the clothes-making project Dipdii Textiles located on the first floor. The project supports local textile traditions with work opportunities. Related: Architects recycle shipping containers into a breezy Dhaka home “What I want to transmit with this building is that there is a lot of beauty in not following the typical standard pattern,” Anna Heringer said. “Anandaloy does not follow a simple rectangular layout. Rather, the building is dancing, and dancing with it is the ramp that follows it around. That ramp is essential, because it is the symbol of inclusion. It is the only ramp in the area, and as the most predominant thing about the building, it triggers a lot of questions. In that way, the architecture itself raises awareness of the importance of including everyone. Diversity is something beautiful and something to celebrate.” Local villagers of all ages and genders, including people with disabilities, built Anandaloy with a no-formwork mud construction technique called cob. Bamboo purchased from local farmers was also used for the structural components and the facade, which features a Vienna weaving pattern that the workers selected. The building completely runs on solar energy.  + Studio Anna Heringer Photography by Kurt Hoerbst via Studio Anna Heringer

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Inspiring mud-and-bamboo Anandaloy Building uplifts a Bangladeshi community

ESW Beauty makes eco-friendly sheet masks your skin will love

November 26, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Eco-conscious skincare connoisseurs often face a dilemma. We know single-use products cause unnecessary waste, yet the sheet mask craze shows no sign of stopping. It’s easy to see why sheet masks remain popular; when you can simply rip open a package, slap on a mess-free sheet mask and go about your day, it’s hard to go back to multi-step wash-off or peel-off masks. Still, few people would argue that the convenience and skincare benefits of sheet masks outweigh the environmental harm and extra waste these products create. Offering a solution to this puzzling problem, ESW Beauty ‘s Raw Juice Cleanse Sheet Masks will help your skin without harming the environment. What is ESW Beauty? Started by Elina Sofia Wang, ESW Beauty began as part of Wang’s search for a cleaner lifestyle. While struggling with health issues, Wang started drinking raw juices and exploring clean beauty options. Unable to find sheet masks that suited her needs, the ESW Beauty founder decided to make her own. By combining a non-toxic, cruelty-free and eco-friendly formula with Wang’s love for raw juices, the Raw Juice Cleanse Sheet Masks were born. What goes into an eco-friendly sheet mask? As the ESW Beauty website so eloquently states, “Our mission is to develop beauty products made with clean, ethically-sourced, and sustainable ingredients . We firmly believe product formulation and ingredients should be held to a higher standard.” What does this mean for ESW’s sheet masks? First, it guarantees that each mask’s formula prioritizes clean ingredients. That means no parabens, phthalates, synthetic fragrances or dyes, formaldehydes, alcohol, silicones or animal-derived ingredients. No animal-derived ingredients ensures that these sheet masks, both the serum and fabric, are fully vegan . As a company of animal lovers, ESW Beauty also keeps its products cruelty-free, pledging to never test on animals. This dedication to vegan and cruelty-free formulas earned ESW certifications from both Leaping Bunny and PETA. But what about the waste issue with sheet masks? To minimize single-use sheet masks’ environmental impact, ESW takes a two-fold approach. Starting with the packaging, ESW’s mask pouches use recyclable low-density polyethylene (LDPE), a material that, while plastic, has been found by a Danish Environmental Protection Agency study to produce the smallest environmental impact among alternatives such as paper , bioplastic and cotton. Once you open the pouch, the mask itself uses a material called cupra (also known as cupro), a sustainable and biodegradable fabric made from cotton linter, which is usually discarded as waste during cotton processing. Reviewing the sheet masks Packaged in an inviting white and blue box, a free editorial sample of ESW Beauty’s Masking & Juicing Essentials Set arrived at my door for review. After unboxing, I surveyed the exciting products inside. The eco-friendly beauty and skincare field isn’t typically known for eye-catching aesthetics, but ESW’s clever designs eschew the industry-standard brown and green color scheme in favor of something more fun. The colorful, bottle-shaped mask pouches not only fit with the raw juice theme but are also a delightful addition to my bathroom counter. Masks aren’t the only treats this kit has in store. In addition to a box of all five sheet masks in the Raw Juice Cleanse line, the full Masking & Juicing Essentials Set includes a clear tote bag, canvas sheet mask travel pouch, clear glass bottle and sprout headband. Right now, ESW Beauty is also including free stickers with every order. While the clear tote, canvas pouch and glass bottle are all cute and handy parts of the set, I was most excited for the sheet masks (obviously) and sprout headband. Before trying out the masks, I slipped on the soft sprout headband to keep my hair out of my face. The headband’s soft material might cause it to slip down your head if you have fine-textured hair, but for me, it did a good job of staying in place. Upon first trying out one of the masks (the delicious-sounding Strawberries & Cream Soothing Raw Juice Mask ), I was pleased to find that it included plenty of serum. No dry masks here! The soft mask material is a great vessel for the serum and contoured well to my face for the entire 20-minute application time. As the weather turns colder and starts drying out and irritating my skin, this mask and The Pink Dream Moisturizing Raw Juice Mask were my favorites for helping my skin recover and look healthy again. But what if your skin needs some extra, targeted attention? If you need a rejuvenating boost, the Pineapple Bliss Revitalizing Raw Juice Mask can help get your skin glowing again. I also enjoyed the Deep Detox Pore Control Raw Juice Mask ‘s slight tingle; I could feel the mask working and appreciated how smooth my skin felt afterward. As a baby-faced 23-year-old, I didn’t expect to see major results from the Green Reset Anti-Aging Raw Juice Mask , but I did notice a slight improvement in the fine lines on my forehead after use. Whether you want something need-specific or simply a luxurious, eco-friendly moisture boost, ESW Raw Juice Face Masks are a choice that your skin and the environment will thank you for. + ESW Beauty Images by Grae Gleason / Inhabitat Editor’s Note: This product review is not sponsored by ESW Beauty. All opinions on the products and company are the author’s own.

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ESW Beauty makes eco-friendly sheet masks your skin will love

Fiat 500 3+1 electric vehicle gets a fresh redesign

November 26, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

The Fiat 500 3+1 electric car is designed to attract customers who want a smart, sustainable ride that blends style and functionality. The addition of a third door is practical, and the car features the same Fiat 500 aesthetic. Best of all, the electric vehicle capabilities are a big win for the planet. For the interior, Fiat chose a warm and soft color pallet on the interior textiles to emphasize a stronger bond with nature. Eco-friendly and recyclable materials are featured as well. Seats are made from a combination of vegan leather and Seaqual fiber derived from recycled plastic, some of which was collected from the ocean. Additionally, chrome replacement paints and mats are made of recycled fibers, and components of the dashboard are made of wood. Related: AUDI’s new electric car will have autonomous vehicle capability and a roof that holds real plants The new Fiat is available in three colors: Rose Gold, Glacier Blue and Onyx Black. It features full LED headlights, two-tone 17” diamond-cut wheel rims and chrome-plated inserts on the windows and side panels, while the seats, dashboard upholstery and steering wheel are all clad in ‘eco-leather.’ The battery pack is now located under the floor, allowing for a roomier interior layout and increased stability. The space has also been organized using modular storage compartments. Technology-wise, La Prima comes with the most advanced level 2 autonomous driving system available, the first of its kind for city cars, according to the company. Customers can look forward to Intelligent Adaptive Cruise Control, lane centering and control, traffic sign recognition, an autonomous emergency brake with pedestrian and cyclist recognition, Intelligent Speed Assistant, a high-resolution rear camera, 360° parking and urban blind spot sensors, automatic twilight and dazzle sensory, emergency call capabilities, a wireless smartphone charger and an electronic parking brake. The electric battery boasts 85 kW fast charging and includes an 11 kW Mode 3 cable for charging at home or in public. Its electric motor is structured around safety and entertainment, integrating a technological “ecosystem” to connect drivers and passengers to the car through their phones. For example, the Fiat app allows users to view charging points nearby and check battery charge levels remotely. + Fiat Images via Fiat

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Fiat 500 3+1 electric vehicle gets a fresh redesign

ChargePoint’s Pasquale Romano on the state of electrification during the pandemic

November 25, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Green

ChargePoint’s Pasquale Romano on the state of electrification during the pandemic This video is sponsored by ChargePoint. “We have found that because of goods delivery being so critical now, even more so than it has been during pre-pandemic times, the fleet market for us is really seeing lots of activity. Virtually every single company out there that has anything from small vans or normal passenger cars all the way up through larger medium and heavy-duty vehicles – we’re just seeing a tremendous amount of interest and activity in that segment and I think it’s because it is so effective in reducing the cost structure of those services.” Katie Fehrenbacher, senior writer & analyst for transportation at GreenBiz, interviewed Pasquale Romano, president & CEO of ChargePoint, during the VERGE 20 virtual event (October 26-30, 2020). View archived videos from the conference here: https://bit.ly/3kMjeXt . taylor flores Wed, 11/25/2020 – 14:50 Featured Off

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ChargePoint’s Pasquale Romano on the state of electrification during the pandemic

Fram Museum extension is dedicated to environmental education

November 25, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Norway- and Denmark-based architecture firm Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter has won an invited competition for the new extension of the Fram Museum, a museum in Oslo dedicated to the stories of Norwegian polar exploration. Dubbed Framtid — Norwegian for ‘future’ — the museum extension stands out from its sharply angular neighbors with its church bell-shaped gable and fully glazed end wall that allows views into the building and out toward the water. The timber-framed building will also be engineered with environmentally friendly considerations as part of the firm’s vision “that architecture exemplifies how we care for our environment.” Inaugurated in 1936, the Fram Museum was primarily built to honor the three great Norwegian polar explorers — Fridtjof Nansen, Otto Sverdrup and Roald Amundsen — and is named after the original wooden exploration vessel Fram that sits at the heart of the museum . Although the new curved extension will be visually distinct from the museum’s A-frame buildings, the modern structure will also take cues from the existing layout with its long form set perpendicular to the water. Related: RRA unveils mountain-inspired ski resort that emphasizes nature and community The new Framtid wing will expand the footprint of the museum with gathering spaces, exhibition spaces, a café with an exterior amphitheater and an auditorium. The light-filled café and gathering spaces will be located at the north side of the building for optimal views of the water and easy access to the boat shuttle. The shore, which is currently private, will be made publicly accessible with these new spaces. Framtid’s exhibition spaces will be placed farther back into the building and be equipped with full light controls to create sensory experiences; passageways connect the new exhibition spaces to the museum’s other three wings. “An important aspect of polar expeditions was research on climate and the environment,” the architects noted. “Like the crews of Fram, Gjøa and Maud, the museum’s guests will be inspired to seek knowledge on environmental education in regard to current climate change and sustainable solutions.” + Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter Images via Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter

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Fram Museum extension is dedicated to environmental education

Denmark’s top fur cooperative is closing

November 25, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

The news that an enormous Danish fur cooperative is closing is bittersweet. While animal-lovers may rejoice at the end of Kopenhagen Fur, it comes on the tail of a massive culling of about 17 million farmed mink in Denmark due to worries that they could spread a mutated form of COVID-19 to humans. Kopenhagen Fur is the world’s largest fur auction house in the world, a cooperative owned by 1,500 Danish fur farmers and brokers. In 2018-19, it sold nearly 25 million mink skins. This week, the auction house announced it would close within the next few years. Related: Denmark to cull millions of minks to prevent spread of mutant coronavirus Humane Society International predicts that this could signify the end of the global fur industry. “The announcement by Kopenhagen Fur that it will cease trading shows that fur production has now passed a tipping point and it could very well signal the beginning of the end of the fur trade,” said Joanna Swabe, HSI Europe senior director of public affairs, as reported in VegNews . “Fur farms are not only the cause of immense and unnecessary animal suffering, but they are also ticking time bombs for deadly diseases. We cannot simply sit back and wait for the next pandemic to emerge from them.” During the summer, mink farms in the U.S., Spain and the Netherlands all diagnosed COVID-19 in these little carnivorous mammals. Experts worried that the mutated form of the virus could threaten the effectiveness of the anticipated coronavirus vaccines. Just hours before the announcement of Kopenhagen Fur’s closure, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) released the “Rapid Risk Assessment: Detection of new SARS-CoV-2 variants related to mink.” This report details the awful consequences of mutated viruses spreading from farmed mink to humans and stresses that this risk also applies to other future viruses besides COVID-19 . “Mink farms provide the ideal environment for a mutating virus,” said Justine Butler, senior health researcher for the animal rights group Viva!. “The animals are kept in horrific conditions and experience extreme stress as a result of their cramped and inhumane surroundings. On these farms, the animals are tightly packed into filthy wire cages, standing on top of each other and in their own feces, which enables viruses to quickly mutate and spread throughout the population.” The Netherlands is planning to stop fur production by March 2021. Perhaps we’ll soon be hearing more announcements about ending this cruel practice from other countries as well. Via VegNews Image via Pixabay

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Denmark’s top fur cooperative is closing

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