Lather is the PETA-approved skincare that reminds us all to slow down

February 22, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

From its natural ingredients to its carbon-neutral operations and its eco-friendly packaging, you’re going to want to lather up with Lather. First spied by Inhabitat at this year’s Indie Beauty Expo, Lather’s long line of sustainable skincare products have made themselves a new home in our medicine cabinets. Founded in 1999, Lather was started by Emilie Hoyt after she battled with migraines — which were partially caused by the harmful ingredients found in conventional skincare and cosmetics. Hoyt is an “explorer at heart” with a deep appreciation for nature, so she drew upon this passion when creating a wellness brand that emphasizes natural ingredients while also keeping the planet in mind at every stage of production. Related: These are our favorite beauty retailers from the Indie Beauty Expo In addition to using ingredients straight from nature, Lather does not test on animals, nor does it work with manufacturers that do. Furthering its commitment to sustainability, Lather is a carbon-neutral company that uses EcoPure, recycled materials and soy-based inks in all of its packaging. As if that wasn’t enough to love, Lather also supports eco-focused charities such as the Baobab Guardians Program, which “employs and empowers women and works hard to ensure the survival of the oldest trees on Earth.” It’s hard to narrow down the products to our favorites, but we must say that the bamboo lemongrass body scrub is one of the most popular Lather products for good reason. The scrub has become an essential part of our showering routine — the scrub suds up to cleanse you while also gently exfoliating skin and emitting a really pleasant, natural fragrance. Follow this up with the matching body lotion for a refreshing scent that invigorates you and a moisturizer that leaves your freshly exfoliated skin at its softest. Along the lines of keeping your skin happy and hydrated, we recommend keeping Lather’s Hand Therapy with you at all times. This restorative lotion is made with shea, oats and olive. The scent is earthy in a pleasant way, and the cream helps relieve cracked hands and dry cuticles. Lather also offers a multitude of face cleansers that target various skin concerns, from dryness to oily textures and sensitivity to blemishes. There are also different formulas, such as gels, creams, oils, and soap bars. We tested the Ultra Mild Face Wash. It’s a powerful cleanser that removes makeup with ease without leaving skin feeling dry or tight. We weren’t in love with the smell, but we didn’t hate it, either. We followed this face wash with the Ultra Light Face Lotion, which doesn’t have much of a scent to it. It was perfect for a daily moisturizer — hydrating enough to banish dryness, but light enough to wear all day without feeling heavy or greasy. Overall wellness is a prime factor behind all of Lather’s products, which is why the company developed a gel based pain reliever for muscle aches and pain. The gel provides temporary pain relief with formulated herbal extracts used by the native tribes of Northern Mexico. The gel is incredibly fast acting once its massaged onto joints or muscles and has a lingering cooling and heating effect that is felt almost instantly thanks to the menthol, camphor and capsaicin in the product. While the scent is powerful, it’s not overbearing and definitely worth it as this gel can quickly alleviate pain. We have made this our go-to pain relieving gel. While Lather is designed to enjoy at home as its own act of self care, the company’s passion for wellness extends in-store, too. From free Pamper Parties for groups to indulge in an afternoon of natural  skincare to relaxation stations with cozy seating and “5-minute stories” from a machine that offers short stories for guests to read, Lather encourages clients to take a moment to breathe and enjoy each passing moment. The brand’s ethos to care about yourself and the environment is evident through and through. + Lather Images via Inhabitat Editor’s Note: This product review is not sponsored by Lather. All opinions on the products and company are the author’s own.

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Lather is the PETA-approved skincare that reminds us all to slow down

Saving the environment one hair wash at a time

February 22, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

In the ongoing dialogue surrounding water consumption and saving water, the length of your shower, how you water your yard and even your toothbrush usage probably come up. But there is another water-thirsty activity that should be added to the discussion — hair washing. Think about it. Daily shampooing by billions of people is destined to strain resources. So taking a moment to consider the ways you can cut back on the suds, the water and the money going down the drain can be the best way to help the environment. Frequency Your hairdresser recommends washing your hair twice daily, often followed by using a conditioner. Between the energy and water consumed, that’s a big hair care footprint. In addition to shorter showers, consider cutting back the frequency of your hair washing to every other day or even a few times each week. Dry shampoo and leave-in conditioner can help provide the look and feel you’re used to in between washings. Specially formulated to omit the use of water altogether, dry shampoo is a quick and easy way to get out the door faster without wasting time and water in the shower. Leave-in conditioner can keep the frizzies at bay with a expedited and no-water-required application. Hot water reduction Heating water is a major household expense and we’re often paying for a service we don’t need, such as washing clothes in hot water that will be just as clean in a cold wash. When it comes to hair washing, consider turning down the heat a bit in favor of cost savings. Of course, slashing your time in the shower will not only save on water-heating costs, but water consumption costs as well. Even better than turning the shower down is turning it off in between wetting your hair and rinsing out the shampoo. For greater results, adopt a less rigid hair-washing schedule altogether. Related: Compensation for conservation: water markets are economists’ answer to scarcity Product consumption While we’re on the conversation of conservation , give a little thought to the amount of hair products you’re using as well. Try cutting back on the amount you apply, since most people use a much larger amount than they need. This not only helps minimize the shampoo that heads down the drain, but offers cost savings too. Water conservation If you’re already cutting back on shower time, think of other ways you can conserve the water you use in your shower. After all, you wouldn’t be the first person to collect your sudsy runoff in a bucket as you bathe. As long as your hair products are earth friendly, the water you collect can be used to water plants , wash animals or irrigate the lawn. Also look into low-flow shower heads that either restrict the flow of water coming out or force air through the shower head so it feels like you’re getting a full stream with only half the water usage. While we’re on the topic of showers, they are almost always a better choice for the planet than baths. An average 10-minute shower uses around 20-25 gallons while a bath averages 35-50 gallons. Outside the home While your morning ritual is likely the culprit for most of your excess hair-washing water consumption, also implement a plan for when you are away from home. Conserving water at the hotel or the gym is still saving water, so keep it up when you’re out. Also, start a dialogue with your hairdresser who’s likely had the conversation before. Ask what he or she is doing to minimize water consumption and resources (think about how many heads get washed each day.) Yes, it might feel like you’re breaking some sort of code to head to the stylist without washing first, but if they are going to do it anyway, there’s no reason to wash twice. Alternately, wash at home and ask them to wet with a spray bottle instead of a full wash during your cut. Types of hair products More and more products are finding their way into the market that aim to satisfy the growing consumer desire for no-water, all-natural solutions to hair care. Remember that all those suds head straight down the drain and into the local water system, so choose non-toxic shampoos and conditioners that are biodegradable. Do it for the fishies and for the purity of the water your family drinks. While biodegradable products are better for the environment , remember that they are also better for you. Your scalp is skin, after all, and skin is the biggest organ in your body. With a high absorption rate, your skin takes in all kinds of chemicals and toxins in daily life. Don’t let your hair products be one of them. In addition to the ingredient list, look at the packaging of your shampoo and conditioner. Use an all-in-one product instead of separate ones to automatically cut plastic waste in half. Better yet, find a refillable option for serious waste-reduction points. There are a host of alternate products that can also aid in the clean-hair goal both in and out of the shower. Many people find success with natural products like apple cider vinegar, baking soda, lemon juice and clay. Baby powder can also work as a dry shampoo in a pinch. Images via Shutterstock

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Saving the environment one hair wash at a time

Tesla Dog Mode is keeping dogs around the country safe and cool

February 22, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

For dog owners, there are few things worse than when people leave their pets in the car, especially when the temps are high. When cracking a window is not enough, Tesla is keeping dogs cool around the country with its first ever Dog Mode. Tesla Dog Mode is a specially designed feature that keeps the car cool whenever pets are left behind. It also shows the current temperature inside the car on a large touchscreen, just in case concerned citizens walk by. All Tesla owners have to do is touch the fan icon when the vehicle is in park, select DOG under Keep Climate On, and the software does the rest. Related: Nico Nevolo quit his job at Tesla to living in his Model X — and he’s loving it According to Jalopnik , Dog Mode remains on until the car battery gets under 20 percent capacity. At that point, the car sends you a notification via the Tesla app. For people who already own a Tesla, the new features are included in the latest software upgrade, which can be done wirelessly. Introducing Dog Mode: set a cabin temperature to keep your dog comfortable while letting passersby know they don’t need to worry pic.twitter.com/xFU6MGZT53 — Tesla (@Tesla) February 14, 2019 Although Tesla Dog Mode is a great way to keep pets cool , the company cautioned owners to check local laws before leaving their dogs behind. In some states, it is illegal to leave pets inside vehicles unattended, and those laws do not change just because you own a Tesla that has this safety feature. Elon Musk looked into adding the Dog Mode feature after an owner sent him a request on Twitter. It only took Musk and his team a few months of engineering to put the plan into motion. “Can you put a dog mode on the Tesla Model 3. Where the music plays and the AC is on, with a display on the screen saying, ‘I’m fine my owner will be right back’?” a Twitter user asked, to which Musk simply answered, “Yes.” Tesla Dog Mode is one of many features that the company included in its latest software update. Apart from the pet mode, owners can download Sentry Mode and a dashcam upgrade. While not as novel as the Tesla Dog Mode, the dashcam allows owners to record data from all cameras (not just the front-facing one) while the Sentry feature detects hazards when the car is in park. + Tesla Via Jalopnik Image via Leo Young and Tesla

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Tesla Dog Mode is keeping dogs around the country safe and cool

A tiny, 96-square-foot rustic pavilion brings the outdoors in

February 22, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Small and portable, this tiny structure offers a versatile shelter for the artist, fisherman or weekend traveler. At only 96 square feet, it could make a micro home , but the space, now called a pavilion, is laid out for an effective work studio, storage shed or traveling gallery. When Danish architect Anders Hermansen designed the pavilion 10 years ago, he presented it as a movable art piece. Perhaps more widely known for his vast furniture line and work with audio-visual company Bang & Olufsen (B&O), the lifelong independent designer wanted to create something that encompassed his love for nature and an active lifestyle. Related: Recyclable art pavilion made of mesh pops up in Kolkata Inspired by that connection to the environment, Hermansen used discarded materials sourced from a construction project in Sydhavnen, Copenhagen to support the structure. The main wall hosts four built-in cabinets for storage and organization. Two of the sides are comprised of large double doors that open to the outdoors. The fourth wall incorporates an entrance and a huge floor-to-ceiling window that draws in natural light while protecting from the elements when Mother Nature is in a bad mood. The interior raw lumber creates a seamless transition from the surrounding natural elements and offers a place to mount supplies. The all-wood design adds to the rustic vibe of this tiny studio pavilion. With the idea that art and nature go hand in hand, the pavilion can be moved from place to place as the need arises by loading it onto a flatbed truck. Although tiny, the pavilion offers plenty of space for storage, work or living, and it is now for sale through Adam Schnack at a $38,000 price tag. It is currently situated in a scenic location at Værløse Flyvestation, near Denmark’s largest film studio. + Anders Hermansen Design Via Curbed Images via Adam Schnack and Lars Gundersen

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A tiny, 96-square-foot rustic pavilion brings the outdoors in

Amazon plans to reach net-zero carbon use by 2030

February 22, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Amazon is continuing its dedication to sustainability by aiming for  net-zero carbon use by the year 2030. The e-commerce behemoth plans to accomplish this ambitious task by adding more renewable energy programs that will be incorporated in its shipping and packaging departments. Amazon already has several carbon cutting initiatives in place. This includes programs like Ship In Own Container, Frustration-Free Packaging and the Closed Loop Fund. The company has also invested in both solar and wind farms as well as solar paneled rooftops. More than 200 engineers, scientists and designers supervise these programs and are committed to long-term sustainability. Related: Amazon’s incredible plant-filled biospheres open in Seattle According to Amazon , the company plans to take its eco-friendly programs a step further by reducing carbon use to zero over the next decade. To that end, Amazon has invested in biofuels, electric vehicles , renewable energy sources and reusable packaging, all of which will make it possible for the company to reach net-zero carbon in 50 percent of its online orders. Reaching net-zero carbon use is easier said than done. Fortunately, Amazon has a host of suppliers who are also dedicated to bettering the environment through renewable energy . Amazon also plans to use customer feedback to help encourage companies to cut down on carbon use through reusable packaging. This is similar to what the online seller has accomplished through its Frustration-Free Packaging and Ship In Own Container programs, which have greatly reduced its carbon footprint in recent years. When it comes to accountability, Amazon is currently tracking its carbon use and plans to share its findings at some point this year. This will help the company gauge its progress over the next few months. Scientists will also use the data to come up with better ways to incorporate sustainable energy practices into its shipping and packaging departments, which will hopefully result in a net-zero carbon footprint  for the company by 2030. + Amazon Image via Amazon

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Amazon plans to reach net-zero carbon use by 2030

Quirky glamping park on South Korean island includes modern ‘pyramids’ and renovated Airstreams

February 22, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Visitors to the remote South Korean island of Jeju may want to book a stay at the vibrant glamping location  Around Follie . Designed by Seoul-based firm  Z_Lab , the campsite, which is located on large lot of land adjacent to a defunct volcano, is made up of seven modern huts, three restored Airstreams and a number of camping sites for those who travel with their own tents. According to the architects, they wanted the glamping site to be a place where guests can fully immerse themselves in Jeju’s incredible landscape. With a wide walking path connecting the guest rooms, the layout was meant to provide visitors with the strong feeling of community. The individual huts are all spaced strategically to give guests privacy while still fostering the idea of people coming together to enjoy the outdoor experiences. Related: Go glamping Wild West-style in these Conestoga covered wagons The main lodging on site is comprised of seven individual huts in shapes reminiscent of modernized pyramids. The pyramid lodges come in four sizes: loft, twin, suite and pool villa. The interiors are bright and airy with minimal furnishings. Most of the cottages have a large wooden deck for dining al fresco or just taking in the fresh air. A fun feature is the open-air rooftop bathrooms, with a large tub to enjoy a bit of star gazing while enjoying a warm bubble bath. For those looking for more of a vintage atmosphere, there is also the option of staying in one of the three reformed Airstreams. The three RVs are each a different size and have been completely renovated into modern guestrooms . They have built-on wooden decks to enjoy the beautiful views that surround the campsite. The glamping site also offers a barbecue restaurant and café located in the large reception, which features a  green-covered rooftop  with an observation deck. Within Around Follie, there are plenty spaces for events and cultural programs year-round, another feature aimed at bringing the community together. + Around Follie + Z_Lab Via Archdaily Photography by Byung-geun Lee and video by hnh

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Quirky glamping park on South Korean island includes modern ‘pyramids’ and renovated Airstreams

How sailing challenged my sustainability values

February 22, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Surviving at sea without harming fish? That ship has sailed.

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How sailing challenged my sustainability values

Episode 160: Dialogue on drawdown, why a Microsoft exec took a job at National Geographic

February 22, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Plus, an excerpt from our interview with former U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, Tom Vilsack.

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Episode 160: Dialogue on drawdown, why a Microsoft exec took a job at National Geographic

The private sector’s 5 big climate risk and adaptation blind spots

February 22, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

A new report considers disclosures by more than 1,600 companies. The findings were fascinating, unsettling and inspiring.

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The private sector’s 5 big climate risk and adaptation blind spots

What to expect with the rise of climate litigation

February 22, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

An attorney lifts the lid on the pioneering climate lawsuits in courts around the world.

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What to expect with the rise of climate litigation

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