New Florida legislation could shutter state’s solar uptake

January 26, 2022 by  
Filed under Business, Green

A bill recently introduced to the Florida legislature could hamper rooftop solar efforts in the state. Republican Senator Jennifer Bradley introduced the bill, which proposed reducing solar reimbursement rates by up to 75%, among other changes. Why the change? Some critics point out lobbying by Florida Power & Light. According to CNN, “A draft version of the bill Bradley introduced was delivered to her by a Florida Power & Light lobbyist on October 18.” Further, Women Building the Future, a political group associated with Bradley, received a $10,000 donation two days later from NextEra Energy, Florida Power & Light’s parent company. However, Bradley claims her real reason for supporting the legislation is because the solar industry is now “mature, with many competitors, large publicly traded companies, and substantially reduced prices.” Related: Solar panel technology breakthrough to increase efficiency Those opposing the legislation argue it will crush Florida’s solar power uptake. The incentives offered to solar power users, such as payback for the power saved, have encouraged a surge in solar use. If the new bill passes, solar uptake could decline drastically. According to solar industry insiders, the bill could make Florida one of the least attractive states for residential solar consumers. On the other hand, utility power suppliers will gain substantially from the move. “It would mean that we would have to close our business here in the state of Florida and pivot to another state,” said Stephanie Provost, chief marketing officer for Vision Solar, while addressing lawmakers at a recent committee hearing. Currently, Florida solar users are reimbursed at a rate similar to other states. Reimbursement comes in the form of a credit on their monthly bills. While Florida has enjoyed this incentive for some time, it still trails behind other states in solar uptake. Today, only about 90,000 Florida homes run on solar power, representing just 1% of all electric consumers in the state. Florida also ranks 21st in the country in terms of solar residential systems per capita. Steve Rutherford, founder of Tampa Bay Solar, worries about how this legislation could impact his livelihood. “It’s going to be a crusher for the solar industry,” Rutherford told CNN. “For 90% of the people that work for me, this will be a significant blow for their pocketbooks.” Via CNN Lead image via Pexels

See the original post here: 
New Florida legislation could shutter state’s solar uptake

California redwoods to be reclaimed by Indigenous groups

January 26, 2022 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Ten Indigenous tribes on  California’s  Lost Coast are about to get their ancestral homeland back.  Save the Redwoods League  announced Tuesday that it will transfer over 500 acres back to the InterTribal Sinkyone Wilderness Council. “It’s a real blessing,” said Priscilla Hunter of the Coyote Valley Band of Pomo Indians, as reported by The Guardian. “It’s like a healing for our ancestors. I know our ancestors are happy. This was given to us to protect.” Hunter is chair of the  InterTribal Sinkyone Wilderness Council , which will now hold title to the land. The 10 tribes will be responsible for stewarding an area of land called Tc’ih-Léh-Dûñ, which means “ Fish  Run Place” in the Sinkyone language. Related: At COP26, Indigenous activists are fighting to be heard The 500 acres include both old-growth and second-growth  trees . The area hasn’t been logged for about 30 years. “This is a property where you can almost tangibly feel that it is healing, that it is recovering,” said Sam Hodder, president and CEO of Save the Redwoods League, as reported by The Guardian. “You walk through the forest and, even as you see the kind of ghostly stumps of ancient trees that were harvested, you could also in the foggy landscape see the monsters that were left behind as well as the young redwoods that are sprouting from those stumps.” Save the Redwoods bought the land for $3.5 million two years ago. Pacific Gas & Electric Co. funded the purchase as part of its mitigation efforts for environmental damage the utility has caused. Marbled murrelet and northern spotted owls are just two of the  species  that benefit from this conservation effort. The Lost Coast transfer is part of the bigger Land Back movement, which is returning  Indigenous  homelands to their descendants. “For so many decades tribal voices have been marginalized in the mainstream conservation movement,” said Hawk Rosales, former executive director of the Sinkyone council. “It’s only until very recently that they have been invited to participate meaningfully and to take a leadership role.” Via The Guardian Lead image via Pixabay

See more here: 
California redwoods to be reclaimed by Indigenous groups

First ceramic geodesic dome in the world is affordable

January 26, 2022 by  
Filed under Green

Geoship installed its first bio-ceramic geodesic dome in a bid to create long-lasting, zero-carbon , fireproof and biologically resonant architecture for a new way of building homes. The company is relatively young, with just 400 paid deposits for homes, but they work by a co-op model and have over 2,000 investors. “Homebuilding is a massive, multi-trillion dollar industry that is unsustainable,” the designers said in a press release. “The Geoship micro-factory and village building platform is a new model for the regenerative future.” Related: Are these zero-carbon domes the future of sustainable housing? The idea is to create more than a new home design , but a new way of creating communities to build homes. Morgan Bierschenk, co-founder and CEO of Geoship, said this all started with community. “My brother and I started building a home for our family,” he said. “We did it on a shoestring budget, with reclaimed materials and lumber we milled on the land. Then we started questioning why — with all of our technology — are we still building with sticks and nails? How does nature build protective shells? Why does it feel so good to step outside the boxes we live in? We started engineering a new kind of home.” To build a bio-ceramic dome, Geoship mixes a type of ceramic crystals and forms them into triangular molds. The pieces are then assembled into a geodesic dome like any other construction material. The carbon used to create the triangular components is far less than traditional sandstone, passive solar or highly efficient house building materials. Plus, the operational energy use is markedly lower as well. The panels are installed on a network of struts that support the dome structure, almost like the interior structure of a mushroom cap. The end product is recyclable , mold-proof, fire-proof and flood-proof. The domes are also hurricane, earthquake and insect resistant. It even comes in cool colors. The next round of funding will be used to build out Geoship’s pilot production, micro-factory and village design platforms. That’s because Geoship is really a materials science company. Bioceramics are a new kind of material designed to create multi-century structures. The materials products used in the builds needs certification, and the pilot program still has to be built out. Their goal is to build “living environments that resonate with nature and catalyze the evolution of consciousness.” + Geoship Images via Geoship

Go here to see the original:
First ceramic geodesic dome in the world is affordable

Brazilian Pavilion at The World Expo transports visitors into nature

January 26, 2022 by  
Filed under Green

The immersive displays at The World Expo Dubai speak to technology, innovation, nature and the environment . Thanks to Cactus, an innovative award-winning design studio, the Brazilian Pavilion stands as an example of these water-cooler topics.  The exhibit aims to transport visitors into scenes of Brazil through the use of larger-than-life visual projections. Encompassing 24,800 square feet of space, the enclosure is covered in a custom-designed, 1002 HT projectable fabric built to withstand the extremes of the Dubai desert. Related: Innovative i-Mesh fabric takes shape at Expo 2020 Dubai The Brazilian Pavilion’s high-tensile strength keeps visitors protected and comfortable, even in the face of sandstorms, windstorms and extreme desert heat. On the other hand, it’s translucent enough to project images inside and outside the enclosure.  The nature of the fabric acts as a projection screen for 60,000 square feet of wall, floor and ceiling to be covered in illustrations of the Brazilian landscape. Guests are immersed into a sensory experience combined of technology and design that celebrates the culture and beauty of Brazil. The digital reproduction of rainforests, cities, canyons, animals , beaches and lush hillsides aims to remove the visitor from the desert and engage them in locations over 7,300 miles away.  The experience requires no transport emissions from travel, wait lines at the airport or pollution from tourists in sensitive areas of Brazil. Instead, it relies on more than 140 projectors to spin up the fully immersive 360 degree environment in a thought-provoking installation that’s both futuristic in design and current in content. The exhibit is open now until the close of The World Expo on March 31, 2022.  “We want the world to see and feel the beauty and intricacies of the country we call home,” explained Marcelo Pontes, head of architecture for Cactus. “The process of achieving seamless UX requires good design at its core. There were many technical roadblocks, including regional weather, sand and heat that made this project more difficult than anything else we have taken on before. Unlike traditional immersive experiences, which only focus on projection mapping inside spaces, we were designing for the entire exterior of the exhibit as well.” + Cactus Photography by Joana Franca and Leonardo Finotti

Original post: 
Brazilian Pavilion at The World Expo transports visitors into nature

3-in-1 flashlight, lighter and pry bar is rechargeable

January 26, 2022 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Want a multi-functional tool that is also eco-friendly? The Hunt 4.0 by London-based SEPTEM Studio is a rechargeable flashlight you can plug into your laptop. It’s also a lighter and a multi-purpose opener tool that fits on your keychain. Hunt 4.0 is the seventh Kickstarter from its creators. It is set to start production after orders received up until the Kickstarter’s deadline in early January 2022. Related: “Cheesy” solar charger kit empowers students in East Africa Hunt 4.0 works in two lighting modes and has a high-powered cree emitter in a titanium body. The flashlight portion of the tool is powered by a lithium-ion battery that will last one and a half hours at maximum brightness, or up to seven hours if you turn it down to the lower 20 lumens mode. That’s enough to take for camping or outdoors where you need extra light. The Hunt 4.0 tool also fills a tiny compartment with lighter fluid and acts as a real lighter. The end of the tool is a flat-head screwdriver or bottle opener that can be used for any task. It’s water resistant and hardy enough to withstand the jangling of your keychain no matter where you keep it. All of these functions are packed into something that fits on your keychain. Hunt 4.0 is just 2.8 inches long and .55 inches across, or about the size of your pinky finger. We love the compact size and durability of a tiny flashlight multi-tool that doesn’t need constant battery changes. Of course you do need a power source with mini USB to recharge. To recharge the Hunt 4.0, you just unscrew the top of the flashlight tool and plug into the USB in the neck of the device. If you have a vehicle with USB that can charge this, you’ll never run out of light while on the road. + SEPTEM Studio Hunt 4.0 Images via SEPTEM Studio

Originally posted here: 
3-in-1 flashlight, lighter and pry bar is rechargeable

Greener Shopping for Business: Circular Ink and Toner from Doorstep Ink

January 26, 2022 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Editor’s note: Greener Shopping recognizes companies that provide genuine improvements in product and service environmental… The post Greener Shopping for Business: Circular Ink and Toner from Doorstep Ink appeared first on Earth911.

More here:
Greener Shopping for Business: Circular Ink and Toner from Doorstep Ink

Winning the war for ESG talent in an era of distrust

January 26, 2022 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Employees’ expectation of an authentic, transparent and data-driven commitment to tackling the climate crisis is here to stay.

More:
Winning the war for ESG talent in an era of distrust

Whither climate tech? A new fund, plus some predictions

January 26, 2022 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Energy Impact Partners is raising a $350 million fund focused on supporting “deep decarbonization” technologies.

Read more:
Whither climate tech? A new fund, plus some predictions

What 50 years of public-private partnerships lends to the world’s green transition

January 26, 2022 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

The economic and societal benefits of airtight trust in persistent policies despite the inevitable shoestring tackles all struggles societies face.

The rest is here:
What 50 years of public-private partnerships lends to the world’s green transition

How to center environmental justice in conservation finance projects

January 26, 2022 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Three case studies in righting past wrongs from the Swinomish Indian tribe, the town of Peoria, Illinois, and the Doris Duke Foundation.

Go here to see the original:
How to center environmental justice in conservation finance projects

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 8198 access attempts in the last 7 days.