Hawaii’s long and winding road to sustainable tourism

June 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

As Hilton, United Airlines and others are learning, educating visitors and local residents alike is critical for future progress.

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Hawaii’s long and winding road to sustainable tourism

Why resilience is resonating in grid modernization dialogues

June 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Strategies like isolated generation, cross-sector planning and partnerships, and planning for the unplannable will apply far beyond islands like Hawaii and Puerto Rico.

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Why resilience is resonating in grid modernization dialogues

Message from Mars: How to institutionalize sustainability

June 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Last week, Mars, Inc. generated headlines by committing $1 billion to achieve the company’s Sustainable in a Generation Plan.

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Message from Mars: How to institutionalize sustainability

Will the energy revolution end in democratization?

June 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

The best of live interviews from GreenBiz events. This episode: Energy company leaders discuss the future of the energy business.

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Will the energy revolution end in democratization?

A new era in modeling catastrophic risk

June 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

The days of one-size-fits all disaster models are over, ushering in a push for more localized data and predictive analytics.

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A new era in modeling catastrophic risk

Roots and reverence: 3 Hawaiian teenagers share hopes for a sustainable future

June 16, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Unfiltered, youthful advice for corporate sustainable professionals and policy experts.

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Roots and reverence: 3 Hawaiian teenagers share hopes for a sustainable future

How do we feed the world?

June 16, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

We might want to look at what McDonald’s did.

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How do we feed the world?

Zaha Hadid-designed Morpheus Hotel with worlds first high-rise exoskeleton opens in Macau

June 15, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Macau has officially opened the doors to Morpheus, a sculptural, 40-story luxury hotel that also boasts the “world’s first” high-rise exoskeleton—a curvaceous lattice-like covering that gives the building its iconic appearance. Designed by Zaha Hadid Architects , the sleek and sinuous structure serves as the new flagship hotel for the City of Dreams resort. The $1.1-billion architectural icon is one of the last projects that architect Zaha Hadid worked on before her untimely death. Morpheus Hotel is the latest addition to Macau’s City of Dreams, an integrated resort that includes a casino , two theaters, a shopping district, 20 restaurants and four hotels on the Cotai Strip. Taking inspiration from China’s rich traditions of jade carving, the architects crafted Morpheus with flowing curves that define the exterior and interior design. “Conceived as a vertical extrusion of its rectangular footprint, a series of voids is carved through its centre to create an urban window connecting the hotel’s interior communal spaces with the city and generating the sculptural forms that define the hotel’s public spaces,” wrote Zaha Hadid Architects in a statement. The Morpheus’ exoskeleton wraps around a pair of towers and a central atrium that soars to a height of 35 meters, while its ground level is connected to the City of Dreams resort’s surrounding three-story podium. A series of sky bridges traverse the atrium, while twelve glass elevators offer spectacular views of the hotel’s interior and exterior. The hotel houses 770 guest rooms, suites and sky villas as well as civic spaces, meeting and event facilities, game rooms, three restaurants, a spa and rooftop pool, and back-of-house areas and ancillary facilities. Related: Zaha Hadid Unveils Plans for “City of Dreams” Hotel Tower in Macau The use of an exoskeleton allowed for the creation of expansive interiors uninterrupted by supporting walls or columns. “Morpheus combines its optimal arrangement with structural integrity and sculptural form,” adds Viviana Muscettola, ZHA’s project director. “The design is intriguing as it makes no reference to traditional architectural typologies.” + Zaha Hadid Architects Images by Virgile Simon Bertrand

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Zaha Hadid-designed Morpheus Hotel with worlds first high-rise exoskeleton opens in Macau

Tiny home resort opens in idyllic forest setting in Wisconsin

June 15, 2018 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Tucked into over 100 acres of lush forestscape, a tiny home village is making a name for itself as the first large-scale tiny home vacation resort in the Midwest. The Canoe Bay Escape Village , which is the brainchild of prolific tiny house builder ESCAPE , is comprised of various tiny homes nestled into a stunning natural backdrop of forest, lakes and wetlands. A popular vacation spot for decades, the Canoe Bay area is a no-brainer location for a resort village. Although the village will eventually include larger homes for rent, the tiny houses in the first phase of the village are located near Mallard and Lost Lakes. Visitors can explore the many hiking and biking trails that weave around the lakes and wetlands, spread out over 100 acres of beautiful forest. Related: Try out tiny house living in Oregon’s new micro-home resort in Mt. Hood The one- and two-bedroom tiny homes at the village are from the company’s popular Traveler series . Each house offers a spacious open floor plan with large windows that let in an abundance of natural light . Sleeping lofts have either a queen- or king-size bed, a bathroom, and a luxury kitchen installed with full-size appliances. Additionally, as with all of the company’s designs, the tiny houses are constructed with a number of sustainable features , such as high-quality insulation made out of recycled products, LED lighting and low-E windows. Solar power and off-grid features are also available to potential home buyers. According to the owner of Canoe Bay and ESCAPE Homes, Dan Dobrowolski, the inspiration behind the innovative resort village stems from giving people the option of trying out tiny home living in an idyllic setting on a short-term basis. Alternatively, the tiny houses are also available for long-term rental or purchase. + Canoe Bay ESCAPE Village Via Dwell Photography by ESCAPE RV/Steve Niedorf

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Tiny home resort opens in idyllic forest setting in Wisconsin

An innovative forever house renovation features a pocket park for the community

June 15, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Mention the word ‘ renovation ’ and thoughts of expansion immediately spring to mind — especially in the expensive suburb Fitzroy of  Melbourne . So when the owners of a two-story terrace house in the neighborhood decided against creating a large home and instead sought to turn part of their unused site into a pocket park, they smartly tapped Austin Maynard Architects to lead the project. The local Australian architecture firm — known for its creative and anti-McMansion designs — created the King Bill “forever home” for a family of four that includes a revamped garden space and curved extensions, one of which is housed in an overhauled horse stable. Instead of building out the entire vacant lot east of the main house, Austin Maynard Architects selectively added a couple structures to the site. Contemporary additions include a new pavilion housing the kitchen, living and dining spaces, as well as a glazed corridor that connects the main house to the old horse stable that’s been converted into the garage and parents’ retreat. Corrugated colorbond steel metal clads the curvaceous extensions to provide a playful and striking contrast to the original brick left intact on the 19th-century terrace house. “Long time Fitzroy locals, the clients chose not to capitalise on their block by exploiting the vacant site,” the architects explained. “They wanted more living space but they had no intention of maximising the economic yields by creating a huge home. Instead, they sought to give something back to the suburb they love through a rich and generous garden .” Related: Energy-efficient Cut Paw Paw house is “ridiculously inside-out” in Australia The team refreshed the garden with new plants while preserving the existing pear and silver birch trees. The concrete slab of the new living space pavilion was carefully cantilevered so as not to disturb the tree root zones. The architects included minimal paving in the garden to maximize site permeability; the plantings also help to reduce the area’s heat island effect. The home also features  passive solar principles and rooftop solar panels. Rainwater is harvested and reused for irrigation and to flush toilets. Thanks to double-glazed windows, natural light fills the home. + Austin Maynard Architects Images by Derek Swalwell

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An innovative forever house renovation features a pocket park for the community

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