Two moody, tranquil cabins perch above a Quebec forest

November 14, 2018 by  
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Montreal-based firm  Nature Humaine has unveiled a beautiful pair of adjoining cabins tucked into a remote forest outside Quebec. The cube-like structures are clad in a burnt wood facade, giving the design a distinctively minimalist aesthetic. To make the most of the incredible setting, the timber cabins have two massive glass walls that provide breathtaking, panoramic views from the interior. Located in the Eastern Townships, Quebec, the two tiny cabins hold court over a steep, rocky terrain. The cabins are clad in a dark, burnt wood that, along with the pre-woven hemlock planks used for the exterior walkways and connection point, create a quiet, natural palette that easily blends into the landscape. Related: Linear Cabin is an elegant hideaway in the woods of Wisconsin To reduce the project’s footprint, the cabins were anchored into thick, but nearly invisible, raw concrete foundations. Overhanging roofs on both structures were designed to emphasize the views but also to reduce solar gains in the hot summer months. The two cabins were slanted just a bit to follow the natural slope of the ground, giving off the rather frightful sensation that they are just about to slide off into the forested abyss below. The cabins are comprised of two modules connected by an interior walkway. The first module houses the living space and kitchen, while the bedrooms are in the second cabin. In keeping with the minimalist nature of the design, the interiors were also kept simple, with just a few select pieces of furniture. From anywhere inside the cabins, sweeping views are provided by the front glass facades, establishing a strong and seamless connection with the outdoors. + Nature Humaine Via Archdaily Photography by Adrien Williams via Nature Humaine

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Two moody, tranquil cabins perch above a Quebec forest

MAD Architects to transform an ancient Chinese courtyard into a kindergarten with a "floating roof"

November 14, 2018 by  
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Beijing-based design practice MAD Architects has broken ground on the Courtyard Kindergarten, a striking adaptive reuse project that transform a traditional siheyuan courtyard from the 1700s into the site of a creative and colorful kindergarten. Located in Beijing, the project aims to preserve the cultural heritage of the site while injecting fresh life through the addition of new structures, including a “dynamic floating roof” that surrounds the historic courtyard. As with many of the firm’s projects, the design features curvaceous elements and is evocative of a Martian landscape. “There is a saying in old Beijing when children are naughty: ‘if you go three days without being punished, the roof will cave in,’” said MAD principal Ma Yansong of one of the inspirations behind the eye-catching rooftop , a place the firm describes as “full of magic — a playful escape for the children that is a symbol of freedom and endless imagination.” Designed as the primary space for children to engage in outdoor sports and activities, the multicolored floating roof will curve around the siheyuan’s existing hipped roofs and tree canopy and will also feature an undulating landscape of several small ‘hills’ and ‘plains.’ Classrooms, a library, a small theater and a gymnasium will be located below the roof in a new building with an open-plan layout that’s surrounded by walls of glass to let in ample natural light as well as views of greenery and the historic buildings next door. The building will also wrap around three existing ancient trees, creating miniature courtyards where children can connect with nature. The Courtyard Kindergarten will accommodate 400 children between the ages of two and five. Related: A 650-foot-long running track tops this space-saving elementary school in China The design aims to reconcile new and old elements, from the existing modern building on-site that was built in the 1990s to the nearly 400-year-old courtyard. Having just broke ground this month, the Courtyard Kindergarten is expected to be completed and operational in the fall of 2019. + MAD Architects Images via MAD Architects

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MAD Architects to transform an ancient Chinese courtyard into a kindergarten with a "floating roof"

Earthling Survey: Plastic or Paper Food Packaging?

November 14, 2018 by  
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Express your opinion and help drive environmental change. Every week, … The post Earthling Survey: Plastic or Paper Food Packaging? appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Earthling Survey: Plastic or Paper Food Packaging?

Survey Results: Eco-Friendly Changes at Home

November 14, 2018 by  
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Thanks to those of you who responded to last week’s … The post Survey Results: Eco-Friendly Changes at Home appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Survey Results: Eco-Friendly Changes at Home

Home Depot is coming full circle

November 14, 2018 by  
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The home improvement giant is building the circular economy into the built environment.

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Home Depot is coming full circle

Recycling Mystery: Milk and Juice Cartons

November 14, 2018 by  
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The process of recycling our paper and plastic materials is … The post Recycling Mystery: Milk and Juice Cartons appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Recycling Mystery: Milk and Juice Cartons

Denver firefighter uses 9 shipping containers to build a stunning family home

November 13, 2018 by  
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Denver-based firefighter Regan Foster used to spend his days putting out fires, but while recovering from a work-related injury, Foster decided to try his hand at building his dream home. The results are breathtaking. Using his own designs, Foster converted nine repurposed shipping containers into a massive 3,840-square-foot home with sophistication that rivals that of any professional architect’s work. Working with architect Joe Simmons of BlueSky Studio , Foster created the design and worked as the principal contractor on the project. To build out the frame of the home, four shipping containers were placed on the ground in pairs set 24 feet apart. Another four containers were then stacked on top of the first level, with a few pushed forward so that they cantilever over the ground floor. The ninth container was placed perpendicular to the back of the second level. Related: Starburst shipping container home to rise in the California desert The team topped the sections of the home with a series of flat roofs, and they covered the front facade in wood panels, contrasting nicely with the corrugated metal. An abundance of large windows were cut out of the containers in order to provide the interior with natural light . Although the exterior of the home is outstanding, the interior of the seven-bedroom, five-bathroom home is just as impressive. Walking into the great room, visitors are greeted with soaring 25-foot ceilings and an open floor plan that leads out to a large patio. As part of the master plan, Foster was determined to maintain the inherent industrial aesthetic of the shipping containers . The inside of the exterior walls were insulated and covered in drywall, but the interior walls and ceilings throughout the living space were left intact so that the corrugated metal would be visible. Foster, who has a passion for furniture making, used reclaimed wood in many of the home’s custom furnishings and design elements. For example, the flooring throughout the home is made with reclaimed barn wood and boards from a felled tree. Foster even refashioned an old walnut slab into a sliding door and used some waste lumber to create a cantilevered walkway that runs the length the second floor. Needless to say, the process of building his own home sparked a new professional path for Foster and his family. After completing the project, Foster retired from the fire department and started his own design and construction company, Foster Design . The family also rents out their home on Airbnb. + Foster Design + BlueSky Studio Via Dwell Photography by Regan Foster and Chris Boylen via Foster Design

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Denver firefighter uses 9 shipping containers to build a stunning family home

Impossible Burgers to hit grocery stores in 2019

November 13, 2018 by  
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The Impossible Burger is a plant-based patty that bleeds and sizzles when it cooks, and for the past couple of years, you could only find it in restaurants . Made from the magic ingredient heme, an iron-containing compound that mimics a meaty flavor, this patty has a smaller environmental footprint than its beef counterpart, and it has become extremely popular since its debut in 2016. Starting next year, the beloved Impossible Burger might just find its way onto the shelves of a grocery store near you. In September, the Impossible Burger expanded from high-end restaurants and made its way to the fast-food chain  White Castle. But now, Impossible Foods has announced that it will bring the Impossible Burger to grocery stores in 2019. Related: White Castle is now offering ‘bleeding’ vegan Impossible Burger sliders “By far the No. 1 message from fans on social media is, ‘When will I be able to buy and cook the Impossible Burger at home?’” Impossible Foods’ CEO and founder Patrick Brown said in a statement. “We can’t wait until home chefs experience the magic and delight of the first plant-based meat that actually cooks and tastes like meat from animals — without any compromise.” If you are ready to fire up the grill and cook your own Impossible Burgers at home, you are going to have to hold off a bit longer. It isn’t clear when they will hit stores, and Impossible Foods says that it is not going to release any more details right now about the retail launch. It isn’t clear if the company will be introducing the burgers in stores nationwide, or if they will only be available in select markets. Consumers will just have to wait and see. You can currently find Impossible Burgers at 5,000 restaurants nationwide, and the company has sold more than 13 million burgers since the 2016 launch. Most reviews of the burger say that it isn’t exactly like a beef patty, but it is still the best veggie burger on the market. It gives consumers the same taste as a beef patty, but there is still a difference when it comes to texture. Impossible Foods said that producing the plant-based patty requires less than a quarter of the water and less than 5 percent of the land needed to make the same amount of ground beef from cows. It also generates less than an eighth of the greenhouse gas emissions. + Impossible Foods Images via Impossible Foods

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Impossible Burgers to hit grocery stores in 2019

Skiing Green

November 13, 2018 by  
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Skiing used to be considered the province of the elite, … The post Skiing Green appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Skiing Green

Burn the (Halloween) Midnight Oil: Transform Halloween Into DIY Candles for Thanksgiving

November 13, 2018 by  
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Halloween has come and gone once again, leaving in its … The post Burn the (Halloween) Midnight Oil: Transform Halloween Into DIY Candles for Thanksgiving appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Burn the (Halloween) Midnight Oil: Transform Halloween Into DIY Candles for Thanksgiving

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