Good, Better, Best: The Climate Impacts of Milks

August 14, 2020 by  
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Milk may do a body good, but it’s not so … The post Good, Better, Best: The Climate Impacts of Milks appeared first on Earth 911.

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Good, Better, Best: The Climate Impacts of Milks

Earth911 Podcast: Celebrating 30 Years of the Environmental Media Awards with CEO Debbie Levin

August 14, 2020 by  
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For 30 years, the Environmental Media Association (EMA) Awards have … The post Earth911 Podcast: Celebrating 30 Years of the Environmental Media Awards with CEO Debbie Levin appeared first on Earth 911.

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Earth911 Podcast: Celebrating 30 Years of the Environmental Media Awards with CEO Debbie Levin

Earth911 Inspiration: For Future Generations

August 14, 2020 by  
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Today’s quote is from Senator Gaylord Nelson, Co-founder of Earth … The post Earth911 Inspiration: For Future Generations appeared first on Earth 911.

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Earth911 Inspiration: For Future Generations

Renewable Natural Gas: Today’s Carbon-Negative Fuel

August 13, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Renewable Natural Gas: Today’s Carbon-Negative Fuel Renewable natural gas sits at the intersection of two critical challenges: addressing increased emissions from organic waste and laying the foundation for zero carbon transportation across all sectors.? By turning waste into fuel, renewable natural gas delivers negative-carbon fuel to fleets today with a production process where resources are continuously used and reused – fueling a sustainable, circular economy. Join us and explore: RNG 101: Production, Distribution, Policy Negative Carbon Transportation – Today Business Case for RNG Moderator: Katie Fehrenbacher, Senior Writer & Analyst, Transportation, GreenBiz Group Speakers: Sam Wade, Director of State Regulatory Affairs, Coalition for Renewable Natural Gas More speakers to be announced If you can’t tune in live, please register and we will email you a link to access the archived webcast footage and resources, available to you on-demand after the webcast. Ritu Sharma Thu, 08/13/2020 – 14:51 Katie Fehrenbacher Senior Writer & Analyst, Transportation GreenBiz Group @katiefehren gbz_webcast_date Thu, 09/10/2020 – 10:00 – Thu, 09/10/2020 – 11:00

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Renewable Natural Gas: Today’s Carbon-Negative Fuel

Renewable Natural Gas: Today’s Carbon-Negative Fuel

August 13, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Renewable Natural Gas: Today’s Carbon-Negative Fuel Renewable natural gas sits at the intersection of two critical challenges: addressing increased emissions from organic waste and laying the foundation for zero carbon transportation across all sectors.? By turning waste into fuel, renewable natural gas delivers negative-carbon fuel to fleets today with a production process where resources are continuously used and reused – fueling a sustainable, circular economy. Join us and explore: RNG 101: Production, Distribution, Policy Negative Carbon Transportation – Today Business Case for RNG Moderator: Katie Fehrenbacher, Senior Writer & Analyst, Transportation, GreenBiz Group Speakers: Sam Wade, Director of State Regulatory Affairs, Coalition for Renewable Natural Gas More speakers to be announced If you can’t tune in live, please register and we will email you a link to access the archived webcast footage and resources, available to you on-demand after the webcast. Ritu Sharma Thu, 08/13/2020 – 14:51 Katie Fehrenbacher Senior Writer & Analyst, Transportation GreenBiz Group @katiefehren gbz_webcast_date Thu, 09/10/2020 – 10:00 – Thu, 09/10/2020 – 11:00

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Renewable Natural Gas: Today’s Carbon-Negative Fuel

PriestmanGoode designs sustainable, plastic-free takeout containers

August 13, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

London-based design studio PriestmanGoode, as part of the Wallpaper* Re-Made project, has imagined a new, sustainable option for restaurant takeaway containers that is reusable and plastic foam-free. As the desire for convenience and takeout food options increases in the world, so does the single-use plastic and other waste. Now, during the COVID-19 pandemic, many restaurants that didn’t originally offer takeout are turning to the option in order to keep their businesses afloat, making environmentally friendly to-go options more important than ever. Related: Designers aim to reduce the waste and impact of airlines Jo Rowan, Associate Director of Strategy at PriestmanGoode explained, “We wanted to re-think food delivery and takeaway in a bid to minimize the environmental impact of convenience culture.” Called ZERO, the takeaway packaging checks many boxes when it comes to eco-friendliness. For one, it reintroduces the idea of reusable containers. Not that long ago, reusable was the norm, but at some point we became a disposable society, endangering the planet with material production and disposal. ZERO also provides an alternative to the standard plastic foam containers that typically can’t be recycled. To achieve zero waste , the idea is to charge the customer an upfront fee for the containers that is then reimbursed when the containers are returned for the next order. In addition to its usefulness as a takeaway alternative, the packaging offers a universal design that is transferable between restaurants. Plus, the containers offer temperature control during transport and delivery. These containers are also versatile and great to use at home, take on a picnic or carry lunch to the office. The bioplastic for the containers, made from a byproduct of the cacao industry, is created by designer Paula Nerlich. Another notable material used for the insulation, designed by Ty Syml, is mycelium . For the food container and bag handles, Lexcell by Yulex provides a 100% plant-based, neoprene-free specialty natural rubber material. In addition, the outer bag comes from Nuatan by Crafting Plastics and is made from 100% raw, renewable resources, is biodegradable and can withstand high temperatures. Finally, Piñatex is used for the bag lid; Piñatex is a natural leather alternative made from cellulose fibers extracted from pineapple leaves. + PriestmanGoode Via Dezeen Images via PriestmanGoode and Carolyn Brown

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PriestmanGoode designs sustainable, plastic-free takeout containers

North Carolina denies permit for extension of Mountain Valley Pipeline

August 13, 2020 by  
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North Carolina has made a step toward clean energy by denying the permit needed for further construction on a pipeline. The North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality (NCDEQ) has  denied a key permit to the Mountain Valley Pipeline that would have extended the project by 75 miles. The Mountain Valley Pipeline was expected to be extended from where it ends in Chatham, Virginia to Graham, North Carolina. The project had been earmarked to follow a route that would see it cross over 207 streams and three ponds. Among the water sources that would have been affected by the project are the Dan River, home to many endangered species , and the Creek Reservoir, which is the main source of drinking water for Burlington, North Carolina. NCDEQ issued a decision to stop the pipeline from being extended, casting doubts over the likelihood of the project ever being completed. Related: Appalachian Trail spared from Atlantic Coast Pipeline “Today’s announcement is further evidence that the era of fracked gas pipelines is over,” said Joan Walker, senior campaign representative for Sierra Club. “We applaud the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality for prioritizing North Carolina’s clean water over corporate polluters’ profits. Dirty, dangerous fracked gas pipelines like Mountain Valley threaten the health of our people, climate, and communities, and aren’t even necessary at a time when clean, renewable energy sources are affordable and abundant.” When issuing the ruling, the NCDEQ noted that the risks involved in developing and running the project are not worth the trouble. Further, there have been doubts about whether the Mountain Valley project will ever be completed. Although the developers claim that 92% of the pipeline is complete, it has been established that only 50% of the project has been completed. North Carolina has been making positive strides toward clean energy. Companies that pollute the environment with greenhouse gases are now being challenged to look at better, greener options. The decision to deny permits to such projects just shows the state’s commitment to a more sustainable future. Via EcoWatch Image via Gokul Raghu M

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North Carolina denies permit for extension of Mountain Valley Pipeline

Migratory birds triumph over Trump administration

August 13, 2020 by  
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Migratory birds had a victory on Tuesday when a federal judge struck down the Trump administration’s latest anti-bird move. By rewriting the Migratory Treaty Bird Act (MTBA), Trump wanted to allow polluters to kill birds without repercussions. The MTBA was first enacted in 1916 and codified into federal law in 1918 to protect birds that were going extinct. Originally, it covered certain species of birds in Canada, which was then part of Great Britain, and the U.S. Later, the act broadened to include more species and more countries, including Mexico, Russia and Japan. The MTBA is one of the oldest wildlife protection laws in the U.S. and was one of the National Audubon Society’s first big victories. Related: US and Canada in drastic crisis with 3 billion birds lost since 1970 Since 2017, Daniel Jorjani, solicitor for the Department of the Interior, has pushed to change the rule. Jorjani’s proposed update would punish construction companies, utilities and other industries, whose work sometimes kills birds , only if they intentionally harmed avian populations. This contradicts the spirit of the act, which urges companies to consider migratory patterns of birds in a project’s development phase. Fortunately for migratory birds, U.S. District Court Judge Valerie Caproni upheld the act. “That has been the letter of the law for the past century,” Caproni said. “But if the Department of the Interior has its way, many mockingbirds and other migratory birds that delight people and support ecosystems throughout the country will be killed without legal consequence.” Environmentalists and bird advocacy groups celebrated the victory. “We’re elated to see this terrible opinion overturned at a time when scientists are warning that we’ve lost as many as 3 billion birds [in North America] in the last 50 years,” said Noah Greenwald, endangered species director at the Center for Biological Diversity. “To relax rules, to have the unhampered killing or birds didn’t make any sense [and] was terrible and cruel really.” Via EcoWatch and Audubon Image via Wolfgang Vogt

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Migratory birds triumph over Trump administration

Stefano Boeri proposes SUPERVERDE urban greening modules

August 13, 2020 by  
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In a bid to bring more greenery to our cities, Milan-headquartered architecture practice Stefano Boeri Architetti has proposed SUPERVERDE, a series of scalable, modular soil blocks designed for greening urban spaces. Described as “a modular portion of living soil,” the SUPERVERDE units are meant to be installed in both public and private urban areas with the intent of strengthening connections between people and nature. The design would also help increase biodiversity, decrease the urban heat island effect and demineralize soils. Best known for his Vertical Forest project — residential towers topped with trees — architect Stefano Boeri is passionate about embedding greenery into cities worldwide. Unlike his typical projects, the SUPERVERDE concept focuses on adaptable, vegetated architecture and consists of a permeable and flexible surface that could be measured and purchased by the square meter. These modular units of living soil would be designed to support a variety of plant life and, by extension, fauna biodiversity.  Related: France’s first Vertical Forest will add a “hectare of forest” to Paris’ skyline “SUPERVERDE, which can be used for always new and different landscapes, is composed of a fine edge, available in various finishes, which contains all the technological equipment necessary for the maintenance of vegetation and supports the tectonic movements of the ground,” the designers explained. “Its versatility and adaptability to any type of urban open space — public, semi-public or private — is the main feature of the project, which allows to demineralize impermeable surfaces thanks to its modular system, suitable to cover even large areas.” The modular concept proposes two main sizes. The first is small, with surface areas ranging from 9 to 20 square meters capable of containing up to three tall trees, 20 medium-sized shrubs and numerous grasses and perennials. The second, extra-large version ranges from 60 to 100 square meters and is capable of hosting a dozen trees or 1,600 medium-sized shrubs and grasses. + Stefano Boeri Architetti Images via Stefano Boeri Architetti

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Stefano Boeri proposes SUPERVERDE urban greening modules

Chipotle debuts surprising new venture: sustainable clothing

August 13, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Stop thinking of Chipotle as just another restaurant and start thinking of it as a great new clothing line. The well-known Mexican chain has launched Chipotle Goods, a line of sustainable clothing made with responsibly-sourced materials. All the clothing line’s profits will support organizations that make fashion and farming more sustainable and better for the planet. Though this move may seem odd, the news won’t shock those who know Chipotle’s record. Since 2012 when Chipotle Mexican Grill began purchasing cotton for uniforms, the company has committed to supporting organic cotton farmers. For years, Chipotle has remained one of the U.S.’s biggest buyers of Global Organic Textile Standard cotton. And with Mexican food on the menu, Chipotle also remains one of the country’s biggest avocado buyers. So, what’s the outcome of combining organic cotton and avocados? That’s right: sustainable clothing. The Chipotle Goods clothing line uses fabric dyed with upcycled avocado pits from Chipotle restaurants. Simmering the pits in water creates a natural ink that Chipotle uses to create custom designs. Such designs include some truly unique pieces, such as an avocado-lined jacket, graphic T-shirts and avocado-dyed totes. The collection also includes sweatshirts, leggings, hats, water bottles, camisoles and baby items. You can show off your sustainable style with a cute foil clutch, or show off your appetite with sandals that announce your love chips and guac. The collection includes lots of cute graphic socks, too. Chipotle Goods even offers a sustainable phone case! Additionally, Chipotle Goods focuses on providing inclusive, gender-neutral clothing. Unisex clothing and sizing features heavily throughout the collection. Sustainable clothing lines show manufacturers and buyers that great fashion doesn’t have to rely on non-renewable resources. Chipotle may be a surprising pioneer in the sustainable fashion world, but this restaurant sets a standard that, hopefully, many others will choose to follow. + Chipotle Images via Chipotle

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Chipotle debuts surprising new venture: sustainable clothing

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