Peecycling: From Liquid Waste to Healthy Crops

January 29, 2020 by  
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Composting toilets are very rare in the U.S., but a … The post Peecycling: From Liquid Waste to Healthy Crops appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Peecycling: From Liquid Waste to Healthy Crops

Maven Moment: Go Play Outside!

January 29, 2020 by  
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I can still hear my mother and grandmother telling my … The post Maven Moment: Go Play Outside! appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Maven Moment: Go Play Outside!

How CEOs, experts and philosophers see the world’s biggest risks differently

January 29, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

The differences highlight how the groups tend to think — in economic and ethical terms.

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How CEOs, experts and philosophers see the world’s biggest risks differently

BREEAM-certified renovation for 70s modernist icon in Amsterdam

January 28, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

MVSA Architects has dramatically breathed new life into Amsterdam’s iconic Rivierstaete — a monolithic 1973 modernist office building on the Amstel — with a sustainable and architecturally sensitive makeover that connects the building to the riverfront and surrounding community in a way unlike ever before. Completed last year, the renovation has earned a BREEAM Very Good distinction for its future-proof design that emphasizes flexibility as well as energy-saving technologies. The addition of green roofs and terraces help absorb stormwater runoff to make the building “Amsterdam Rainproof.” Located in the south of Amsterdam , the eight-story Rivierstaete was originally designed by architect Hugh Maaskant as Europe’s largest office building in the early 1970s. In recent years, the massive modernist building has struggled to attract tenants and, in 2013, international real estate company Vastint purchased the structure in a public sale and tapped MVSA Architects to lead the redesign. Instead of taking the easier option of demolishing and constructing a new building on site, the team decided to embrace the original design with a renovation. Critical to the redesign was opening up the building to the surroundings, which necessitated replacing the original pinched band of windows on the white-tiled facade with floor-to-ceiling glass . The new glazed facade, along with planted roof terraces added at different levels, gives the building a more open and inviting feel. The roof terraces, roof gardens, and green roofs also help provide water buffering and retention. Related: Amsterdam’s new circular archives building sustainably generates all of its own energy The glazed facade helps bring a greater amount of natural light indoors, which have now been rendered completely asbestos free to contribute to a cleaner and healthier working environment. Daylight control and motion sensors as well as solar shades provide optimized and energy-efficient climate control. The interior layout has also been reconfigured for flexibility to ensure a future-proof design.  + MVSA Architects Images via MVSA, Barwerd van der Plas, and Philip Lyaruu

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BREEAM-certified renovation for 70s modernist icon in Amsterdam

Hundreds of Amazon employees risk jobs to protest company’s climate policies

January 28, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Hundreds of Amazon employees have joined in solidarity, forming the advocacy group Amazon Employees for Climate Justice (AECJ) to protest the company’s climate policies. AECJ seeks to push Amazon into adopting more eco-conscious practices, but Amazon has threatened the protesters with termination for violating its communications policy. Undeterred, AECJ’s campaign continues to pressure the e-commerce behemoth into rethinking its environmental impact. Last autumn, Amazon became The Climate Pledge ’s first signatory, vowing to meet the Paris Agreement 10 years early. Amazon announced, “The Climate Pledge calls on signatories to be net-zero carbon across their businesses by 2040 — a decade ahead of the Paris Accord’s goal of 2050.” Amazon promised to decarbonize, develop low-carbon products and services, invest $100 million toward reforestation and shift toward 80% renewable energy by 2024 and 100% renewable energy by 2030. Related: Over 6,000 employees demand Amazon take climate change seriously In response, AECJ — which bills itself on Twitter as “a group of Amazon employees who believe it’s our responsibility to ensure our business models don’t contribute to the climate crisis” — has called on the tech giant to accelerate its sustainability practices. AECJ wants Amazon to achieve carbon neutrality by 2030 and steer away from contracts with fossil fuel companies. To guarantee accountability with its Climate Pledge, Amazon also unveiled a sustainability website . There, Amazon publicly pledged to “promote safe and inclusive workplaces in our operations and throughout our supply chain.” That measure became a point of contention with AECJ, whose members criticize Amazon for not taking sufficient action. For instance, Wired reported that Amazon workers lambasted Amazon’s supply chain for being “built at the expense of warehouse workers who work at a pace that causes higher-than-industry-average industry rates. It’s not humane to have people scared to go to the bathroom.” Perhaps the stickiest of point of all is Amazon’s policy that restricts employees from speaking negatively in public about the company without prior approval. An Amazon spokesperson explained, “While all employees are welcome to engage constructively with any of the many teams inside Amazon that work on sustainability and other topics, we do enforce our external communications policy and will not allow employees to publicly disparage or misrepresent the company or the hard work of their colleagues who are developing solutions to these hard problems.” Despite the policy, AECJ has decided to publicly criticize Amazon for its climate policies, tweeting, “Hundreds of us decided to stand up to our employer, Amazon. We are scared. But we decided we couldn’t live with ourselves if we let a policy silence us in the face of an issue of such moral gravity like the climate crisis … Workers everywhere must have the right to question their own employer’s contributions and responsibilities in the climate crisis.” + Amazon Employees for Climate Justice + Amazon Via Vox and Wired Image via Shutterstock

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Hundreds of Amazon employees risk jobs to protest company’s climate policies

Church Stone Shelter welcomes hikers in Finland

January 28, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

In the celebrated nature reserve of Kintulammi, Finland, architect Malin Moisio of Tampere-based architecture studio Arkkitehtitoimisto TILASTO has created the Kirkkokiven laavu — the Church Stone Shelter — as a free and welcome respite to hikers. Built mainly from wood and recycled materials, the minimalist and contemporary shelter was inspired by a large natural boulder located close by. The project’s name takes inspiration from the history of the boulder, which once served as a primitive church for local horse shepherds in the 18th century. Developed as part of a network of free shelters in the Kintulammi nature reserve, the Church Stone Shelter primarily serves as a place for rest and meal preparation rather than overnight stays. To improve accessibility, the hiking shelter can also be reached by a wheelchair-accessible path that leads from a nearby parking area. Related: Glowing, celestial-inspired shelter communes with nature in Denmark Constructed from a vertically placed 5-by-5-inch timber frame, the gable-roofed shelter, with its rectangular floor plan, evokes the image of a house with a hearth at its heart. This familiar form, combined with the predominant use of warm-toned timber, gives the shelter its welcoming and cozy quality, while its tall, vaulted ceiling recalls the sacral spaces of a church. Both gable ends are completely open to the outdoors to emphasize a fluid connection with nature; small windows of varying sizes provide carefully framed views of the forest. The use of timber, which is treated with a natural blend of tar and linseed oil, also helps blend the building into its wooded surroundings. The wooden walls were placed atop a plinth made of recycled paving stones. The steeply pitched roof is felted. “The building was developed in cooperation with the city-owned Ekokumppanit Oy and the Parish of Tampere who contributed to the building materials,” the architect said. “All the construction was done on site without electricity, mainly with hand tools. Within a short period of time, the Church Stone Shelter has become an iconic symbol of the Kintulampi Hiking and Nature Reserve.” + Arkkitehtitoimisto TILASTO Photography by Malin Moisio and Julia Kivela? via Arkkitehtitoimisto TILASTO

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Church Stone Shelter welcomes hikers in Finland

Former scrapyard is now a site for sustainable, solar-powered homes

January 28, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Unit One Architects has turned a disused London lot into a row of dwellings with energy-saving features to meet the Level 4 Code for Sustainable Homes . Located behind a historic neighborhood of terraced Victorian houses in northern London’s Harringay Ladder district, the Cozens Place properties include solar panels , energy-efficient insulation and semi-permeable drainage to sustainably manage rainwater. Originally a residential area, this spot was hit by a V1 bomb strike during World War II. In the years following, the neglected commercial site sat unoccupied, morphing from a back-land plot into garages and eventually a working scrapyard . The disused site became a hot-spot for criminal activity because of its lack of safeguarding and general isolation. In 2013, the land was purchased through auction by Reve Developments, and planning permission was gained to transform the site back into its initial purpose. Unit One Architects designed the set of row-style homes so that the site couldn’t continue to be cut through on foot, therefore dissuading criminals and improving security for the surrounding area as well. Related: War ruins are reborn as a sustainable home in Lebanon Cozens Place consists of three two-bedroom homes with thoughtfully landscaped, private front and back gardens, off-street parking and split-level open-floor plans. The included solar panels are concealed with a 45-degree roof pitch on the top of the second house, which can be accessed by the operable skylight. Apart from the high-quality insulation, the buildings also feature a high level of air-tightness and built-in underfloor heating. Bricks were used in the profile to match the Victorian buildings located behind the new homes. The houses were also positioned on an east-west axis to connect internal and external spaces. This allowed optimal light to shine into the habitable rooms, no matter what time of day, while making the homes feel more expansive, regardless of the narrow width of the building plot. + Unit One Architects Photography by Charlie Birchmore Photography via Unit One Architects

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Former scrapyard is now a site for sustainable, solar-powered homes

Self-sufficient floating office building for GCA will take anchor in Rotterdam

January 28, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Copenhagen- and Rotterdam-based studio Powerhouse Company has unveiled designs for a unique floating office building to be anchored in the historic Rotterdam port of Rijnhaven. Created as the new headquarters for the Global Center on Adaptation (GCA), the contemporary structure will use a wide range of sustainability measures, such as heat exchangers and a green roof , to target energy-neutral, self-sufficient operations. The building, named Floating Office Rotterdam, will also be built entirely from timber. Led by former UN-Chairman Ban Ki-moon alongside Microsoft founder Bill Gates and IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva, the GCA focuses on the mitigation of climate change through technology, planning and investment. Floating Office Rotterdam encapsulates the organization’s values with its sustainable design and will serve as a showcase of pioneering climate-resilient features. The unique building is expected to be opened by the Secretary General Ban Ki-moon and Mayor of Rotterdam Ahmed Aboutaleb during the international Summit on Adaptation in fall 2020. Related: Carbon-neutral, prefab development targets sustainable urbanism for Rotterdam’s Rijnhaven area Floating Office Rotterdam will break ground in spring 2020 at the Van Leeuwen grounds at the Masshaven before it is shipped to the Rijnhaven. Timber will be used as the main construction material to reduce the building’s carbon footprint, while passive solar principles have informed the design to reduce the energy demands. In addition to office space, Floating Office Rotterdam will also include a restaurant with a large outdoor terrace and a floating swimming pool in the Maas River. “Designing a sustainable, floating office building was a very challenging commission, and we approached it in an integrated way,” said Nanne de Ru, architect and founder of Powerhouse Company. “By using the water of the Rijnhaven to cool the building, and by using the roof of the office as a large energy source, the building is truly autarkic. The building structure is designed in wood; it can easily be demounted and reused. The building is ready for the circular economy .” + Powerhouse Company Photography by Plomp and Atchain via Powerhouse Company

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Self-sufficient floating office building for GCA will take anchor in Rotterdam

Infographic: Illnesses Caused by Dirty Water

January 28, 2020 by  
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Did you know that over 780 million people worldwide lack … The post Infographic: Illnesses Caused by Dirty Water appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Infographic: Illnesses Caused by Dirty Water

We Earthlings: Let’s Recycle More Aluminum

January 28, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Recycle

What connects us all? Nature and our shared relationships through … The post We Earthlings: Let’s Recycle More Aluminum appeared first on Earth911.com.

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We Earthlings: Let’s Recycle More Aluminum

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