Community is the key to resilience

July 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Four weeks into the job, Josh Stanbro, chief resilience officer of the City and County of Honolulu, discussed confronting the sustainability challenges confronting the city and Hawaii as a state and part of the world at large.”On Oahu, people recognize that there are direct and immediate threats from climate change,” said Stanbro. Forward-thinking Honolulu had recently voted to establish an office of resilience that tackles affordable housing, critical infrastructure and response to natural hazards associated with climate change and sea level rise.  

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Community is the key to resilience

Hawaiian Electric Company (Sponsor)

July 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

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Hawaiian Electric Company (Sponsor)

Granite Power (Sponsor)

July 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

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Granite Power (Sponsor)

Biomimicry @ 20: A conversation with Janine Benyus

July 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

It’s been two decades since the launch of a book and a movement on harnessing nature’s designs to solve pressing environmental challenges. How — and where — is it going?

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Biomimicry @ 20: A conversation with Janine Benyus

IKEA’s 7 imperatives for scrapping food waste

July 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

The furniture maker-turned-restaurateur partnered with tech companies Leanpath and Winnow to save thousands of tons of wasted food resources and euros.

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IKEA’s 7 imperatives for scrapping food waste

This framework could help measure climate action in cities

July 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

The mission of the Gold Standard Foundation is to show that projects meant to mitigate global warming can go hand in hand with sustainable development.

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This framework could help measure climate action in cities

British retailer Tesco to detoxify clothing

July 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Fashion brands from H&M to Benetton to Levi Strauss have committed to Greenpeace’s initiative to detoxify the industry.

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British retailer Tesco to detoxify clothing

An improbable ocean voyage to end plastic waste

July 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

In 2008, two sailors drifted across the North Pacific to Hawaii on a raft made from 15,000 plastic bottles. Their journey inspired a movement to save the seas.

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An improbable ocean voyage to end plastic waste

Vertical farming startup raises $200M from Alphabet, Jeff Bezos

July 21, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Indoor vertical farming is on the rise, if a recent funding round for San Francisco startup Plenty is any indication. The company just scored what they say is the largest agriculture technology investment in history. Plenty has attracted attention – and quite a lot of money – from well-known tech greats like Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos and Alphabet Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt. Plenty is utilizing technology to improve agriculture. The startup draws on big data processing, micro-sensor technology, and LED lighting in an effort to make affordable, local food available for people around the world. Their system uses less water and space than conventional farms, and grows food more efficiently. Plenty says they can yield as much as 350 times more crops per square foot than a typical farm. Their recent Series B funding round, led by Japanese media corporation SoftBank ‘s Vision Fund, turned out to be quite fruitful at $200 million. Related: 40-foot shipping container farm can grow 5 acres of food with 97% less water SoftBank CEO Masayoshi Son said in a statement, “By combining technology with optimal agriculture methods, Plenty is working to make ultra-fresh, nutrient-rich food accessible to everyone in an always-local way that minimizes wastage from transport. We believe that Plenty’s team will remake the current food system to improve people’s quality of life.” Plenty will use the $200 million to start expanding, and plan to bring their first produce to market later this year. They plan to grow two to five acre indoor farms, which the BBC said is around the size of a Walmart or Home Depot. The company already employs 100 people working in three facilities in Wyoming and San Francisco. Initially, Plenty will provide mainly leafy greens and herbs for distributors that have already signed on, according to co-founder and CEO Matt Barnard. He said in a statement, “The world is out of land in the places it’s most economical to grow these crops. After a decade of development driven by one of our founders, our technology is uniquely capable of growing super clean food with no pesticides nor GMOs while cutting water consumption by 99 percent…We’re now ready to build out our farm network and serve communities around the globe.” + Plenty Via Plenty and the BBC Images via Plenty Facebook

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Vertical farming startup raises $200M from Alphabet, Jeff Bezos

Montreal supermarket is Canada’s first to grow produce on its own rooftop garden

July 21, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

When the Montreal borough of Saint-Laurent began pushing for green roofs , a supermarket wondered if it could do regulations one better. Fast-forward a few years and IGA Extra Famille Duchemin now claims to be the first grocery store in Canada to sell produce grown on its own roof. High above its LEED Gold-certified retail space, IGA’s 25,000-foot garden features more than 30 different varieties of certified-organic produce, including tomatoes, lettuce, radishes, kale, eggplant, and basil. Speaking to the Ottawa Citizen , co-owner Richard Duchemin said he decided to perceive Saint-Laurent’s requirement not as a burden but an opportunity. Related: New York City unveils massive green-roofed film and fashion hub in Brooklyn Not only does a green roof help regulate the temperature of the building below it, saving energy, but it also feeds into consumer demand for food with a smaller carbon footprint. “People are very interested in buying local,” he said. “There’s nothing more local than this.” The garden, which is irrigated using water reclaimed from the store’s dehumidification system, has also become a mini-Eden for birds, bees, and other embattled urban fauna. Duchemin compares IGA’s produce-laden roof to those “little boxes where [supermarkets] grow herbs,” but on a grander scale. “We pushed it further because we know we’re able to sell what we produce here,” he added. Related: Green roofs cool co-working shipping container office in Brazil If proven successful, GA Extra Famille Duchemin could even kick-start a trend across Canada. Pierre St-Laurent, executive vice-president for Quebec at Sobeys , which owns the IGA chain, is said to be following the store’s progress with great interest. Photos via Facebook Via Ottawa Citizen

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Montreal supermarket is Canada’s first to grow produce on its own rooftop garden

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