New Florida legislation could shutter state’s solar uptake

January 26, 2022 by  
Filed under Business, Green

A bill recently introduced to the Florida legislature could hamper rooftop solar efforts in the state. Republican Senator Jennifer Bradley introduced the bill, which proposed reducing solar reimbursement rates by up to 75%, among other changes. Why the change? Some critics point out lobbying by Florida Power & Light. According to CNN, “A draft version of the bill Bradley introduced was delivered to her by a Florida Power & Light lobbyist on October 18.” Further, Women Building the Future, a political group associated with Bradley, received a $10,000 donation two days later from NextEra Energy, Florida Power & Light’s parent company. However, Bradley claims her real reason for supporting the legislation is because the solar industry is now “mature, with many competitors, large publicly traded companies, and substantially reduced prices.” Related: Solar panel technology breakthrough to increase efficiency Those opposing the legislation argue it will crush Florida’s solar power uptake. The incentives offered to solar power users, such as payback for the power saved, have encouraged a surge in solar use. If the new bill passes, solar uptake could decline drastically. According to solar industry insiders, the bill could make Florida one of the least attractive states for residential solar consumers. On the other hand, utility power suppliers will gain substantially from the move. “It would mean that we would have to close our business here in the state of Florida and pivot to another state,” said Stephanie Provost, chief marketing officer for Vision Solar, while addressing lawmakers at a recent committee hearing. Currently, Florida solar users are reimbursed at a rate similar to other states. Reimbursement comes in the form of a credit on their monthly bills. While Florida has enjoyed this incentive for some time, it still trails behind other states in solar uptake. Today, only about 90,000 Florida homes run on solar power, representing just 1% of all electric consumers in the state. Florida also ranks 21st in the country in terms of solar residential systems per capita. Steve Rutherford, founder of Tampa Bay Solar, worries about how this legislation could impact his livelihood. “It’s going to be a crusher for the solar industry,” Rutherford told CNN. “For 90% of the people that work for me, this will be a significant blow for their pocketbooks.” Via CNN Lead image via Pexels

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New Florida legislation could shutter state’s solar uptake

The State of the Plastic Bottle

January 26, 2022 by  
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In the 1954 movie “Sabrina,” Linus Larrabee declares that the future of business is plastics… The post The State of the Plastic Bottle appeared first on Earth911.

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The State of the Plastic Bottle

Greener Shopping for Business: Circular Ink and Toner from Doorstep Ink

January 26, 2022 by  
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Editor’s note: Greener Shopping recognizes companies that provide genuine improvements in product and service environmental… The post Greener Shopping for Business: Circular Ink and Toner from Doorstep Ink appeared first on Earth911.

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Greener Shopping for Business: Circular Ink and Toner from Doorstep Ink

Winning the war for ESG talent in an era of distrust

January 26, 2022 by  
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Employees’ expectation of an authentic, transparent and data-driven commitment to tackling the climate crisis is here to stay.

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Winning the war for ESG talent in an era of distrust

Whither climate tech? A new fund, plus some predictions

January 26, 2022 by  
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Energy Impact Partners is raising a $350 million fund focused on supporting “deep decarbonization” technologies.

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Whither climate tech? A new fund, plus some predictions

What 50 years of public-private partnerships lends to the world’s green transition

January 26, 2022 by  
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The economic and societal benefits of airtight trust in persistent policies despite the inevitable shoestring tackles all struggles societies face.

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What 50 years of public-private partnerships lends to the world’s green transition

How to center environmental justice in conservation finance projects

January 26, 2022 by  
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Three case studies in righting past wrongs from the Swinomish Indian tribe, the town of Peoria, Illinois, and the Doris Duke Foundation.

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How to center environmental justice in conservation finance projects

Investors Aviva, BMO toughen the line on net zero pledges

January 26, 2022 by  
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Aviva Investors and BMO Global Asset Management are the latest big investment firms to ramp up pressure on corporates to strengthen their climate strategies.

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Investors Aviva, BMO toughen the line on net zero pledges

Transparency Matters: The Story of ESG Data

January 26, 2022 by  
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Investors are increasingly adopting ESG scores to inform decision making, but it can be difficult for companies to understand how ESG data providers inform their analysis and quantify corporate performance.

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Transparency Matters: The Story of ESG Data

Solar panel technology breakthrough to increase efficiency

January 25, 2022 by  
Filed under Business, Green

With the pressure on to save ourselves from global warming, we need more efficient  solar panels  like yesterday. But the next best thing is soon, and thanks to new developments in solar technology, solar panels may increase their efficiency by almost half by 2025. Still, that will only be about 35% efficient. Much of the sunlight that hits a solar panel can’t be turned into  electricity . Right now, the average solar panel is about 22% efficient at turning sunlight into usable energy. Only the most high-end panels — the really expensive ones used for spacecrafts and such — are more efficient. Related: Affordable solar homes are lifting homeowners out of poverty Silicon-based solar panels are finicky. They prefer shorter wavelengths in the red and yellow part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Longer light waves are too weak, and light waves in the blue and green end of the spectrum tend to bounce off the silicon panels. Worse, they can generate  heat  that degrades the panels. In 2014, a group of  researchers  at the University of Cambridge started trying to convert blue and green light waves into red ones so that solar panels could harness more power. The team, led by physicist Akshay Rao, hoped to boost efficiency to 35%. The University of Cambridge ran with the idea, using it to start a new company, Cambridge Photon Technology, with Rao as its scientific officer. “We’re trying to deal with this problem of how you improve solar PV performance and bring down costs significantly without throwing away the established silicon  technology ,” said David Wilson, head of business development at Cambridge Photon Technology, as reported by Nature. Of course, this is a complicated process. But put very simply, when light strikes photovoltaic material, it creates something called an exciton. This consists of an electron (negatively charged) and an electron vacancy (positively charged) connected by an electrostatic charge. But with the right material, an organic polymer semiconductor, the photon can split into two excitons with lower energy. Both of these can convert to electric current. “You’re preserving the total  energy  that comes in and out, but you’re making the silicon receive a higher photon flux in the portion of the spectrum that it’s good at converting into electricity,” Wilson said. By the end of this year, Rao hopes to have a working prototype that is 31% efficient. Watch for the 35% efficient panel sometime after 2025. Via CleanTechnica , Nature Lead image © Nature

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Solar panel technology breakthrough to increase efficiency

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